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Così Fan Tutte
Così
Così
fan tutte, ossia La scuola degli amanti (Italian: [koˈzi fan ˈtutte osˈsiːa la ˈskwɔːla deʎʎ aˈmanti]; Thus Do They All, or The School for Lovers), K. 588, is an Italian-language opera buffa in two acts by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
first performed on 26 January 1790 at the Burgtheater
Burgtheater
in Vienna, Austria. The libretto was written by Lorenzo Da Ponte
Lorenzo Da Ponte
who also wrote Le nozze di Figaro and Don Giovanni. Although it is commonly held that Così
Così
fan tutte was written and composed at the suggestion of the Emperor Joseph II, recent research does not support this idea.[1] There is evidence that Mozart's contemporary Antonio Salieri
Antonio Salieri
tried to set the libretto but left it unfinished
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Timpani
Ranges of individual sizes[1] Related instrumentsKus Naqareh Timpani
Timpani
sound Timpani
Timpani
(/ˈtɪmpəni/;[2] Italian pronunciation: [ˈtimpani]) or kettledrums (also informally called timps[2]) are musical instruments in the percussion family. A type of drum, they consist of a skin called a head stretched over a large bowl traditionally made of copper. Most modern timpani are pedal timpani and can be tuned quickly and accurately to specific pitches by skilled players through the use of a movable foot-pedal. They are played by striking the head with a specialized drum stick called a timpani stick or timpani mallet. Timpani
Timpani
evolved from military drums to become a staple of the classical orchestra by the last third of the 18th century
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James Morris (bass-baritone)
James Peppler Morris[1] (born 10 January 1947)[2] is a leading American bass-baritone opera singer. He is known for his interpretation of the role of Wotan
Wotan
in Richard Wagner's operatic cycle, Der Ring des Nibelungen. The Metropolitan Opera
Metropolitan Opera
video recording of the complete cycle with Morris as Wotan
Wotan
has been described as an "exceptional issue on every count."[3] It was broadcast on PBS in 1990, to the largest viewing audience of the Ring Cycle
Ring Cycle
in human history. James Morris was born in Baltimore, Maryland, where he studied voice with Rosa Ponselle[2] and at the Peabody Conservatory. He attended the University of Maryland
University of Maryland
and also studied at the Academy of Vocal Arts in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
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Bo Skovhus
Bo Skovhus (born May 22, 1962 in Ikast, Denmark) is a Danish opera singer (baritone). Skovhus studied at the Royal Academy of Music in Aarhus, at the Royal Academy for Opera of Copenhagen and in New York with Oren Brown. While studying voice at the Royal Academy for Opera of Copenhagen, Skovhus was considering becoming a doctor. Based on a recommendation from his teacher, he was offered the role of Don Giovanni in the Vienna Volksoper's 1988 production of Don Giovanni. His debut was a stirring success, and launched his career. He appeared frequently in Vienna, at both the Vienna Volksoper and at the Vienna State Opera
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Ann Murray
Ann Murray (born 27 August 1949) is an Irish mezzo-soprano.[1]Contents1 Life and career 2 Family 3 Recordings 4 Bibliography 5 References 6 External linksLife and career[edit] Murray was born in Dublin. Having won a number of prizes at the Feis Ceoil, she studied singing at the College of Music (now the DIT Conservatory of Music and Drama, Dublin) with Nancy Calthorpe, as well as arts and music at University College Dublin. In 1968, she made her Irish opera debut performing the shepherd role in a concert performance of Tosca.[2] She pursued further studies with Frederic Cox at the Royal Manchester College of Music and made her stage debut as Alcestis in Christoph Willibald Gluck's Alceste in 1974
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Tessitura
In music, tessitura (Italian: [tessiˈtuːra], pl. tessiture, "texture"; English: /tɛsɪˈtjuːrə/) is the most esthetically acceptable and comfortable vocal range for a given singer or, less frequently, musical instrument; the range in which a given type of voice presents its best-sounding (or characteristic) timbre. This broad definition is often interpreted to refer specifically to the pitch range that most frequently occurs within a given part of a musical piece. Hence, in musical notation, tessitura is the ambitus in which that particular vocal (or less often instrumental) part lies—whether high or low, etc. However, the tessitura of a part or voice is not decided by the extremes of their range, but rather by which share of this total range is most used
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Woodwind Instrument
Woodwind instruments are a family of musical instruments within the more general category of wind instruments. There are two main types of woodwind instruments: flutes and reed instruments (otherwise called reed pipes). What differentiates these instruments from other wind instruments is the way in which they produce their sound.[1] All woodwinds produce sound by splitting an exhaled air stream on a sharp edge, such as a reed or a fipple. A woodwind may be made of any material, not just wood. Common examples include brass, silver, and cane, as well as other metals including gold and platinum
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Flute
Plucked Appalachian dulcimer
Appalachian dulcimer
(United States) Autoharp Baglama
Baglama
or Saz (Turkey) Bajo sexto
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Oboe
Plucked Appalachian dulcimer
Appalachian dulcimer
(United States) Autoharp Baglama
Baglama
or Saz (Turkey) Bajo sexto
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Soprano
A soprano [soˈpraːno] is a type of classical female singing voice and has the highest vocal range of all voice types. The soprano's vocal range (using scientific pitch notation) is from approximately middle C (C4) = 261 Hz to "high A" (A5) =880 Hz in choral music, or to "soprano C" (C6, two octaves above middle C) =1046 Hz or higher in operatic music. In four-part chorale style harmony, the soprano takes the highest part, which usually encompasses the melody.[1] The soprano voice type is generally divided into the coloratura, soubrette, lyric, spinto, and dramatic soprano
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Conducting
Conducting
Conducting
is the art of directing a musical performance, such as an orchestral or choral concert
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Voice Type
A voice type is a particular human singing voice identified as having certain qualities or characteristics of vocal range, vocal weight, tessitura, vocal timbre, and vocal transition points (passaggio), such as breaks and lifts within the voice. Other considerations are physical characteristics, speech level, scientific testing, and vocal register.[1] A singer's voice type is identified by a process known as voice classification, by which the human voice is evaluated and thereby designated into a particular voice type. The discipline of voice classification developed within European classical music and is not generally applicable to other forms of singing. Voice classification is often used within opera to associate possible roles with potential voices
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Operabase
Operabase is an online database of opera performances, opera houses and companies, and performers themselves as well as their agents. Found at operabase.com, it was created in 1996 by English software engineer and opera lover Mike Gibb.[1] Initially a hobby site, it became his full-time occupation after three years.[2] Opera magazine describes the Operabase website as "the most comprehensive source of data on operatic activity".[3]Contents1 The public site 2 The Operabase professional section 3 Opera statistics3.1 Most played composers 3.2 Most popular operas 3.3 Most operatic places4 ReferencesThe public site[edit] By its tenth anniversary, in 2006, the site received "about 10,000 visitors a day to the public site, who look at over four million pages a month between them
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Thomas Bowdler
Thomas Bowdler, LRCP, FRS (/ˈbaʊdlər/; 11 July 1754 – 24 February 1825[1]) was an English physician best known for publishing The Family Shakspeare, an expurgated edition of William Shakespeare's work. The work, edited by his sister Henrietta Maria Bowdler, was intended to provide a version of Shakespeare that was more appropriate for 19th century women and children than the original. The eponymous verb bowdlerise (or bowdlerize)[2] has associated his name with the censorship of elements deemed inappropriate for children, not only of literature but also of motion pictures[3] and television programmes. Bowdler also published several other works, some reflecting his interest in and knowledge of continental Europe
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Clarinet
Plucked Appalachian dulcimer
Appalachian dulcimer
(United States) Autoharp Baglama
Baglama
or Saz (Turkey) Bajo sexto
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William Mann (critic)
William Somervell Mann (14 February 1924 – 5 September 1989) was an English music critic. Born in India, he was educated at Winchester and Cambridge, studying music with several prominent composers, before taking up a career as a critic. For most of his career he was on the staff of The Times in London, where his radical views were in contrast with the paper's traditional outlook
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