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Coronach (horse)
Coronach was a British Thoroughbred
Thoroughbred
racehorse and sire. He was a champion two-year-old who went on to become only the third horse to complete The Derby, Eclipse Stakes and St Leger treble (Tulyar, in 1952, become the most recent and fourth horse to equal the feat)[2] as a three-year-old in 1926, a year in which he also won the St. James's Palace Stakes
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Glasgow Herald
The Herald is a Scottish broadsheet newspaper founded in 1783.[1] The Herald is the longest running national newspaper in the world[2] and is the eighth oldest daily paper in the world.[3] The title was simplified from The Glasgow
Glasgow
Herald in 1992.[4]Contents1 History1.1 Founding 1.2 First sale and renaming 1.3 George Outram 1.4 Later years2 Notable people2.1 Editorship 2.2 Columnists 2.3 The Herald Diary3 Publishing and circulation 4 Political stance 5 See also 6 References 7 Bibliography 8 External linksHistory[edit] Founding[edit] The newspaper was founded by an Edinburgh-born printer called John Mennons in January 1783 as a weekly publication called the Glasgow Advertiser. Mennons' first edition had a global scoop: news of the treaties of Versailles, reached Mennons via the Lord Provost of Glasgow
Glasgow
just as he was putting the paper together. War had ended with the American colonies, he revealed
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Goodwood Racecourse
Goodwood Racecourse
Goodwood Racecourse
is a horse-racing track five miles north of Chichester, West Sussex, in England
England
controlled by the family of the Duke of Richmond, whose seat is nearby Goodwood House. It hosts the annual Glorious Goodwood meeting in late July and early August, which is one of the highlights of the British flat racing calendar, and is home to three of the UK's 32 Group One flat races, the Sussex Stakes, the Goodwood Cup and the Nassau Stakes. Although the race meeting has become known as 'Glorious Goodwood', it is sponsored by Qatar and officially called the 'Qatar Goodwood Festival' [1].In 1895It is considered to enjoy a very attractive setting to the north of Trundle Iron Age hill fort, which is used as an informal grandstand with views of the whole course
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Sporting Life (British Newspaper)
The Sporting Life was a British newspaper published from 1859 until 1998, best known for its coverage of horse racing.[1] Latterly it has continued as a multi-sports website. Priced at one penny, the Sporting Life initially appeared twice weekly, on Wednesdays and Saturdays. It became a daily newspaper in 1883, and in 1886 acquired its rival, Bell's Life in London
Bell's Life in London
and Sporting Chronicle (est. 1822).[1] In 1924 the newspaper sponsored the 1924 Women's Olympiad
1924 Women's Olympiad
held at Stamford Bridge in London. The paper continued publication until its merger with the Racing Post in May 1998; a proposed relaunch was aborted in 1999.[2] On 20 December 1996, before the newspaper arm closed, Sporting Life launched an online version of the paper, sportinglife.com
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Doncaster Racecourse
Doncaster
Doncaster
Racecourse
Racecourse
(also known as the Town Moor course) is a racecourse in Doncaster, South Yorkshire, England. It hosts two of Great Britain's 31 Group 1 flat races, the St Leger Stakes and the Racing Post Trophy.Contents1 History 2 Specifications 3 Notable races 4 References 5 Bibliography 6 External linksHistory[edit] Doncaster
Doncaster
is one of the oldest (and in terms of physical capacity – largest) established centres for horse racing in Britain, with records of regular race meetings going back to the 16th century
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Middle Park Stakes
The Middle Park Stakes is a Group 1 flat horse race in Great Britain open to two-year-old colts. It is run on the Rowley Mile at Newmarket over a distance of 6 furlongs (1,207 metres), and it is scheduled to take place each year in September.Contents1 History 2 Records 3 Winners since 1965 4 Earlier winners 5 See also 6 ReferencesHistory[edit] The event was founded by William Blenkiron, and it is named after his stud at Eltham. It was established in 1866, and was initially titled the Middle Park Plate. It was originally open to horses of either gender. The race was formerly staged during Newmarket's Cambridgeshire Meeting in late September or early October. It was restricted to colts in 1987
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Newmarket Racecourse
Newmarket Racecourse, which has a capacity of 45,000,[1] is a British Thoroughbred
Thoroughbred
horse racing venue in the town of Newmarket, Suffolk. Newmarket is often referred to as the headquarters of British horseracing and is home to the largest cluster of training yards in the country[2] and many key horse racing organisations, including Tattersalls, the National Horseracing Museum
National Horseracing Museum
and the National Stud.[2] The racecourse hosts two of the country's five Classic Races - the 1,000 Guineas and 2,000 Guineas, and numerous other Group races. In total, it hosts 9 of British racing's 32 annual Group 1 races.Contents1 History 2 Layout 3 Notable races 4 Locations 5 References 6 Bibliography 7 External linksHistory[edit] Racing in Newmarket was recorded in the time of James I. Charles II was known to attend races on Newmarket Heath with his brother, the future James II
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Pound (mass)
The pound or pound-mass is a unit of mass used in the imperial, United States customary and other systems of measurement. Various definitions have been used; the most common today is the international avoirdupois pound, which is legally defined as exactly 6999453592370000000♠0.45359237 kilograms, and which is divided into 16 avoirdupois ounces.[1] The international standard symbol for the avoirdupois pound is lb;[2] an alternative symbol is lbm[3] (for most pound definitions), # (chiefly in the U.S.), and ℔[4] or ″̶[5] (specifically for the apothecaries' pound). The unit is descended from the Roman libra (hence the abbreviation "lb"). The English word pound is cognate with, among others, German Pfund, Dutch pond, and Swedish pund
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2000 Guineas
The 2000 Guineas Stakes
2000 Guineas Stakes
is a Group 1 flat horse race in Great Britain open to three-year-old thoroughbred colts and fillies. It is run on the Rowley Mile at Newmarket over a distance of 1 mile (1,609 metres), and it is scheduled to take place each year in late April or early May. It is one of Britain's five Classic races, and at present it is the first to be run in the year. It also serves as the opening leg of the Triple Crown, followed by the Derby and the St Leger, although the feat of winning all three has been rarely attempted in recent decades.Contents1 History 2 Records 3 Winners 4 See also 5 ReferencesHistory[edit] The 2000 Guineas Stakes
2000 Guineas Stakes
was first run on 18 April 1809, and it preceded the introduction of a version for fillies only, the 1000 Guineas Stakes, by five years
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Royal Ascot
Ascot Racecourse
Racecourse
("ascot" pronounced /ˈæskət/, often incorrectly pronounced /ˈæskɒt/) is a British racecourse, located in Ascot, Berkshire, England, which is used for thoroughbred horse racing. It is one of the leading racecourses in the United Kingdom, hosting 13 of Britain's 36 annual Group 1 horse races. The course, owned by Ascot Racecourse
Racecourse
Ltd,[1] enjoys close associations with the British Royal Family, being approximately six miles from Windsor Castle. Ascot today stages twenty-six days of racing over the course of the year, comprising eighteen flat meetings held between the months of May and October inclusive. It also stages important jump racing throughout the winter months. The Royal Meeting held each June, remains a major draw, its highlight being The Gold Cup
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Sandown Park Racecourse
Sandown Park is a horse racing course and leisure venue in Esher, Surrey, England, located in the outer suburbs of London. It hosts 5 Grade One races over jumps and one Group 1 flat race, the Eclipse Stakes. It regularly has horse racing during afternoons, evenings and on weekends, and also hosts many non racing events such as trade shows, wedding fairs, toy fairs, car shows and auctions, property shows, concerts, and even some private events. It was requisitioned by the “War Department” from 1940-1945 for World War II.The venue have hosted bands such as UB40, Madness, Girls Aloud, Sugababes, Spandau Ballet, Westlife, Boyzone
Boyzone
and Simply Red
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Doncaster
Doncaster
Doncaster
(/ˈdɒŋkəstər/[1] or /ˈdɒŋkæstər/) is a large market town in South Yorkshire, England. Together with its surrounding suburbs and settlements, the town forms part of the Metropolitan Borough of Doncaster, which had a mid-2016 est. population of 306,400.[2] The town itself has a population of 109,805 [3] The Doncaster
Doncaster
Urban Area had a population of 158,141 in 2011[citation needed] and includes Doncaster
Doncaster
and neighbouring small villages. Historically part of the West Riding of Yorkshire
West Riding of Yorkshire
until 1974, Doncaster
Doncaster
is about 17 miles (30 km) north-east of Sheffield, with which it is served by an international airport, Doncaster
Doncaster
Sheffield Airport in Finningley
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Stallion (horse)
A stallion is a male horse that has not been gelded (castrated). Stallions follow the conformation and phenotype of their breed, but within that standard, the presence of hormones such as testosterone may give stallions a thicker, "cresty" neck, as well as a somewhat more muscular physique as compared to female horses, known as mares, and castrated males, called geldings. Temperament varies widely based on genetics, and training, but because of their instincts as herd animals, they may be prone to aggressive behavior, particularly toward other stallions, and thus require careful management by knowledgeable handlers
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George Lambton
George Lambton
George Lambton
(23 December 1860 - 23 July 1945) was a British thoroughbred racehorse trainer. He was British flat racing Champion Trainer in the 1906, 1911 and 1912 seasons.Contents1 Early life 2 Horse racing 3 Family 4 British Classic Race wins 5 References 6 External linksEarly life[edit] The Honourable George Lambton
George Lambton
was born in London on 23 December 1860, the fifth son of George Lambton, 2nd Earl of Durham and his wife, Beatrix, daughter of James Hamilton, 1st Duke of Abercorn. He was educated at Winchester, Brighton and Eton, and admitted to Trinity College, Cambridge on 11 June 1879
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East Lavington
East Lavington, formerly Woolavington, is a village and civil parish in the District of Chichester
Chichester
in West Sussex, England.[3] It is located six kilometres (4 miles) south of Petworth, west of the A285 road. West Lavington was formerly an exclave of Woolavington.[4] The parish has a land area of 797 hectares (1968 acres). In the 2001 census 357 people lived in 87 households, of whom 129 were economically active. It includes the settlement of Upper Norwood. The parish is dominated by Seaford College, a private school which owns 400 acres (1.6 km2). The ancient parish church has become the school chapel. References[edit]^ "2001 Census: West Sussex
West Sussex
– Population by Parish" (PDF). West Sussex County Council. Archived from the original (PDF) on 8 June 2011. Retrieved 12 April 2009.  ^ " Civil parish
Civil parish
population 2011"
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