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Cornell University Press
The Cornell University
Cornell University
Press, is a division of Cornell University housed in Sage House, the former residence of Henry William Sage
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Parent Company
A parent company is a company that owns enough voting stock in another firm to control management and operation by doing and influencing or electing its board of directors
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Printing Press
A printing press is a device for applying pressure to an inked surface resting upon a print medium (such as paper or cloth), thereby transferring the ink. It marked a dramatic improvement on earlier printing methods in which the cloth, paper or other medium was brushed or rubbed repeatedly to achieve the transfer of ink, and accelerated the process. Typically used for texts, the invention and global spread of the printing press was one of the most influential events in the second millennium.[1][2] Johannes Gutenberg, a goldsmith by profession, developed, circa 1439, a printing system by adapting existing technologies to printing purposes, as well as making inventions of his own. Printing
Printing
in East Asia had been prevalent since the Tang dynasty,[3][4] and in Europe, woodblock printing based on existing screw presses was common by the 14th century
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Ivy League
The Ivy League
Ivy League
is a collegiate athletic conference comprising sports teams from eight private universities in the Northeastern United States. The conference name is also commonly used to refer to those eight schools as a group beyond the sports context.[2] The eight members are Brown University, Columbia University, Cornell University, Dartmouth College, Harvard
Harvard
University, the University
University
of Pennsylvania, Princeton University, and Yale
Yale
University
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Cornell Big Red Baseball
The Cornell Big Red
Cornell Big Red
baseball team is a varsity intercollegiate athletic team of Cornell University
Cornell University
in Ithaca, New York, United States.[2] The team is a member of the Ivy League, which is part of NCAA Division I. Cornell's first baseball team was fielded in 1869 and participated in the Eastern Intercollegiate Baseball League (EIBL) until 1992
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Provost (education)
A provost is the senior academic administrator at many institutions of higher education in the United States
United States
and Canada, the equivalent of a pro-vice-chancellor at some institutions in the United Kingdom and Ireland, or a Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic) at most Australian universities. Additionally, the heads of certain colleges in the UK and Ireland are called provosts; it is, in this sense, the equivalent of a master (or various other titles for the head of the college) at other colleges.Contents1 Duties, role, titles, and selection 2 Other titles and uses 3 History 4 See also 5 Referen
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Don Michael Randel
Don Michael Randel (born December 9, 1940) is an American musicologist, specializing in the music of the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
and Renaissance
Renaissance
in Spain and France.[1] He is currently the Chair of the Board of the American Academy of Arts
Arts
and Sciences,[2] a trustee of the Carnegie Corporation,[3] and a member of the Encyclopædia Britannica editorial board,[4] and has previously served as the fifth president of The Andrew W
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Mellon Foundation
The Andrew W. Mellon
Andrew W. Mellon
Foundation of New York City
New York City
in the United States, is a private foundation with five core areas of interest, endowed with wealth accumulated by Andrew W. Mellon
Andrew W. Mellon
of the Mellon family
Mellon family
of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. It is the product of the 1969 merger of the Avalon Foundation and the Old Dominion Foundation. These foundations were set up separately by Paul Mellon
Paul Mellon
and Ailsa Mellon Bruce, the children of Andrew W. Mellon. It is housed in the expanded former offices of the Bollingen Foundation in New York City, another educational philanthropy supported by Paul Mellon. Elizabeth Alexander is the Foundation's president. Her predecessors have included Earl Lewis, Don Randel, William G. Bowen, John Edward Sawyer, and Nathan Pusey
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Typesetting
Typesetting
Typesetting
is the composition of text by means of arranging physical types[1] or the digital equivalents. Stored letters and other symbols (called sorts in mechanical systems and glyphs in digital systems) are retrieved and ordered according to a language's orthography for visual display. Typesetting
Typesetting
requires one or more fonts (which are widely but erroneously confused with and substituted for typefaces)
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Student Financial Aid (United States)
Student financial aid in the United States is funding that is available exclusively to students attending a post-secondary educational institution in the United States. This funding is to assist in covering the many costs incurred in the pursuit of post-secondary education. Financial aid is available from federal, state, educational institutions, and private agencies (foundations), and can be awarded in the forms of grants, education loans, work-study and scholarships
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University Press
A university press is an academic publishing house specializing in academic monographs and scholarly journals. Most are nonprofit and an integral component of a large research university. They publish work that has been reviewed by scholars in the field. They produce mainly scholarly works, but also often have "popular" titles, such as books on religion or on regional topics. Because scholarly books are mostly unprofitable, university presses may also publish textbooks and reference works, which tend to have larger audiences and sell more copies. Most university presses operate at a loss and are subsidized by their owners; others are required to break even.[1] Demand has fallen as library budgets are cut and the online sales of used books undercut the new book market
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Steam-power
A steam engine is a heat engine that performs mechanical work using steam as its working fluid. Steam engines are external combustion engines,[2] where the working fluid is separated from the combustion products. Non-combustion heat sources such as solar power, nuclear power or geothermal energy may be used. The ideal thermodynamic cycle used to analyze this process is called the Rankine cycle. In the cycle, water is heated and changes into steam in a boiler operating at a high pressure. When expanded using pistons or turbines mechanical work is done. The reduced-pressure steam is then exhausted to the atmosphere, or condensed and pumped back into the boiler. In general usage, the term steam engine can refer to either complete steam plants (including boilers etc.) such as railway steam locomotives and portable engines, or may refer to the piston or turbine machinery alone, as in the beam engine and stationary steam engine
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Ithaca, New York
Ithaca
Ithaca
/ˈɪθəkə/ is a city in the Southern Tier–Finger Lakes region of New York. It is the seat of Tompkins County, as well as the largest community in the Ithaca– Tompkins County
Tompkins County
metropolitan area. This area contains the municipalities of the Town of Ithaca, the village of Cayuga Heights, and other towns and villages in Tompkins County. The city of Ithaca
Ithaca
is located on the southern shore of Cayuga Lake, in Central New York. It is named for the Greek island of Ithaca.[3] Ithaca
Ithaca
is home to Cornell University, an Ivy League
Ivy League
school of over 20,000 students, most of whom study at its local campus.[4] Ithaca College
College
is located just south of the city in the Town of Ithaca, adding to the area's "college town" atmosphere
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Publishing
Publishing
Publishing
is the dissemination of literature, music, or information—the activity of making information available to the general public. In some cases, authors may be their own publishers, meaning originators and developers of content also provide media to deliver and display the content for the same. Also, the word publisher can refer to the individual who leads a publishing company or an imprint or to a person who owns/heads a magazine. Traditionally, the term refers to the distribution of printed works such as books (the "book trade") and newspapers
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