HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Corned Beef Hash
Hash is a dish consisting of diced or chopped meat, potatoes and spices that are mixed together and then cooked either alone or with other ingredients such as onions.[1] The name is derived from the French verb hacher (to chop).[2] Canned corned beef hash became especially popular in some countries including in Britain and France
France
during and after the Second World War as rationing limited the availability of fresh meat.[3] The dish may also use corned or roast beef. In many locations, hash is served primarily as a breakfast food on restaurant menus and as home cuisine, often served with eggs and toast and occasionally fried potatoes such as hash browns or home fries
[...More...]

"Corned Beef Hash" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Hash (other)
Hash, hashes, hash mark, or hashing may refer to:Contents1 Substances 2 Hash mark 3 Computing 4 Other uses 5 See alsoSubstances[edit] Hash (food), a coarse mixture of ingredients Hash, a nickname for hashish, a cannabis product Hash mark[edit] Hash marks, a marking on hockey rinks and gridiron football fields Hatch mark, a form of mathematical notation
[...More...]

"Hash (other)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Marjoram
Marjoram
Marjoram
/ˈmɑːrdʒərəm/[2] ( Origanum
Origanum
majorana) is a somewhat cold-sensitive perennial herb or undershrub with sweet pine and citrus flavors. In some Middle Eastern countries, marjoram is synonymous with oregano, and there the names sweet marjoram and knotted marjoram are used to distinguish it from other plants of the genus Origanum
[...More...]

"Marjoram" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Worcestershire Sauce
Worcestershire sauce
Worcestershire sauce
(/ˈwʊstərʃər/ ( listen)),[3] (Merriam-Webster: ˈwu̇s-tə(r)-ˌshir-, -shər- also -ˌshī(-ə)r- ), frequently shortened to Worcester
Worcester
sauce (/ˈwʊstər/), is a fermented liquid condiment of complex mixture originally created by the Worcester
Worcester
chemists John Wheeley Lea and William Henry Perrins, who went on to form the company Lea & Perrins. The ingredients are allowed to mature for 18 months before being blended and bottled in Worcester, where the exact recipe is kept a secret. Lea and Perrins devised the recipe in the 1830s, however it was not to their liking and was set aside and forgotten about. It was not until the barrels were rediscovered many months later that the taste had mellowed into what is now known as Worcestershire sauce
[...More...]

"Worcestershire Sauce" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Beet
The beetroot is the taproot portion of the beet plant,[1] usually known in North America as the beet, also table beet, garden beet, red beet, or golden beet. It is one of several of the cultivated varieties of Beta vulgaris
Beta vulgaris
grown for their edible taproots and their leaves (called beet greens). These varieties have been classified as B. vulgaris subsp. vulgaris Conditiva Group.[2] Other than as a food, beets have use as a food colouring and as a medicinal plant
[...More...]

"Beet" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ketchup
Ketchup
Ketchup
(also catsup, tomato sauce or red sauce) is a condiment. Traditionally, recipes used egg whites, mushrooms, oysters, mussels, or walnuts, among other ingredients,[1][2] but in modern times the unmodified term usually refers to tomato ketchup. Ketchup
Ketchup
is a sweet and tangy sauce typically made from tomatoes, sweetener, and vinegar, with assorted seasonings and spices. The latter vary by recipe, but commonly include onions, allspice, coriander, cloves, cumin, garlic, mustard and sometimes celery, cinnamon or ginger.[3] The market leader in the United States (60% market share) and United Kingdom (82%) is Heinz.[4][5] Hunt's
Hunt's
has the second biggest share of the US market with less than 20%
[...More...]

"Ketchup" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Bearnaise Sauce
Béarnaise sauce
Béarnaise sauce
(/bərˈneɪz/; French: [be.aʁ.nɛz]) is a sauce made of clarified butter emulsified in egg yolks and white wine vinegar and flavored with herbs. It is considered to be a "child" of the mother Hollandaise sauce, one of the five mother sauces in the French haute cuisine repertoire.[1] The difference is only in the flavoring: Béarnaise uses shallot, chervil, peppercorns, gherkin and tarragon in a reduction of vinegar and wine, while Hollandaise is more stripped down, using a reduction of lemon juice or white wine and peppercorns
[...More...]

"Bearnaise Sauce" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Swedish Cuisine
Swedish cuisine
Swedish cuisine
is the traditional food of the people of Sweden. Due to Sweden's large North–South expanse, there are regional differences between the cuisine of North and South Sweden.[1] Historically, in the far North, meats such as reindeer, and other (semi-) game dishes were eaten, some of which have their roots in the Sami culture, while fresh vegetables have played a larger role in the South
[...More...]

"Swedish Cuisine" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Pyttipanna
Pyttipanna, also pytt i panna,[1] pyttipanne (Norwegian), pyttipannu (Finnish), is a hodgepodge of food similar to a hash. The term is Swedish for "small pieces in pan". It is a popular dish in Sweden, Norway
Norway
and Finland, and in Denmark, where it bears the name biksemad, literally meaning "mixed food". Traditionally consisting of potatoes, onions, and any kind of chopped or minced meat such as sausage, ham or meatballs, diced and then pan fried, it is often served with a fried egg, pickled beetroot slices, sour pickled gherkin slices, capers and sometimes ketchup or brown sauce.[2] The dish was originally made from leftovers of past meals[1] but now it is far more common to prepare pyttipanna from prime ingredients. Frozen pyttipanna of many varieties can be bought in almost every Swedish, Danish, Norwegian and Finnish supermarket
[...More...]

"Pyttipanna" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Carl Michael Bellman
Fredman's epistles Fredman's songsPatron(s) King Gustav IIIBellman's signature Carl Michael Bellman
Carl Michael Bellman
(Swedish pronunciation: [ˈkɑːɭ ²miːkaɛl ˈbɛlman] ( listen); 4 February 1740 – 11 February 1795[1]) was a Swedish songwriter, composer, musician, poet and entertainer. He is a central figure in the Swedish song tradition and remains a powerful influence in Swedish music, as well as in Scandinavian literature, to this day. He has been compared to Shakespeare, Beethoven, Mozart, and Hogarth, but his gift, using elegantly rococo classical references in comic contrast to sordid drinking and prostitution—at once regretted and celebrated in song—is unique.[2] Bellman is best known for two collections of poems set to music, Fredman's songs
Fredman's songs
(Fredmans sånger) and Fredman's epistles
Fredman's epistles
(Fredmans epistlar). Each consists of about 70 songs
[...More...]

"Carl Michael Bellman" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Austrian Cuisine
Austrian cuisine
Austrian cuisine
is a style of cuisine native to Austria
Austria
and composed of influences from throughout the former Austro-Hungarian Empire.[1] Regional influences from Italy, Hungary, Bohemi
[...More...]

"Austrian Cuisine" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Tyrol (state)
Tyrol
Tyrol
(/tɪˈroʊl, taɪ-, ˈtaɪroʊl/; German: Tirol, pronounced [tiˈʀoːl] ( listen); Italian: Tirolo) is a federal state (Bundesland) in western Austria. It comprises the Austrian part of the historical Princely County of Tyrol. It is a constituent part of the present-day Euroregion Tyrol–South Tyrol–Trentino
Euroregion Tyrol–South Tyrol–Trentino
(together with South Tyrol
South Tyrol
and Trentino
Trentino
in Italy). The capital of Tyrol
Tyrol
is Innsbruck.[1]Contents1 Geography 2 History 3 Towns 4 Transport 5 Administrative divisions 6 See also 7 ReferencesGeography[edit] The state of Tyrol
Tyrol
is separated into two parts, divided by a 7-kilometre wide (4.3 mi) strip. The larger territory is called North Tyrol
North Tyrol
(Nordtirol) and the smaller area is called East Tyrol (Osttirol)
[...More...]

"Tyrol (state)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Sausage
A sausage is a cylindrical meat product usually made from ground meat, often pork, beef, or veal, along with salt, spices and other flavourings, and breadcrumbs, encased by a skin. Typically, a sausage is formed in a casing traditionally made from intestine, but sometimes from synthetic materials. Sausages that are sold raw are cooked in many ways, including pan-frying, broiling and barbecuing. Some sausages are cooked during processing and the casing may then be removed. Sausage making
Sausage making
is a traditional food preservation technique. Sausages may be preserved by curing, drying (often in association with fermentation or culturing, which can contribute to preservation), smoking, or freezing. Some cured or smoked sausages can be stored without refrigeration
[...More...]

"Sausage" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Parsley
Apium crispum Mill. Apium petroselinum L. Petroselinum
Petroselinum
hortense Hoffm. Petroselinum
Petroselinum
sativum Parsley
Parsley
or garden parsley ( Petroselinum
Petroselinum
crispum) is a species of flowering plant in the family Apiaceae, native to the central Mediterranean region
Mediterranean region
(southern Italy, Greece, Portugal, Spain, Malta, Morocco, Algeria, and Tunisia), naturalized elsewhere in Europe, and widely cultivated as an herb, a spice, and a vegetable. Where it grows as a biennial, in the first year, it forms a rosette of tripinnate leaves 10–25 cm (3.9–9.8 in) long with numerous 1–3 cm (0.4–1.2 in) leaflets, and a taproot used as a food store over the winter. Parsley
Parsley
is widely used in European, Middle Eastern, and American cooking. Curly leaf parsley is often used as a garnish
[...More...]

"Parsley" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Danish Language
Danish /ˈdeɪnɪʃ/ ( listen) (dansk pronounced [ˈdanˀsɡ] ( listen); dansk sprog, [ˈdanˀsɡ ˈsbʁɔwˀ]) is a North Germanic language spoken by around six million people, principally in Denmark
Denmark
and in the region of Southern Schleswig
Southern Schleswig
in northern Germany, where it has minority language status.[3] Also, minor Danish-speaking communities are found in Norway, Sweden, Spain, the United States, Canada, Brazil, and Argentina. Due to immigration and language shift in urban areas, around 15–20% of the population of Greenland
Greenland
speak Danish as their home language. Along with the other North Germanic languages, Danish is a descendant of Old Norse, the common language of the Germanic peoples
Germanic peoples
who lived in Scandinavia
Scandinavia
during the Viking Era
[...More...]

"Danish Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Slovenia
Coordinates: 46°07′N 14°49′E / 46.117°N 14.817°E / 46.117; 14.817Republic of Slovenia Republika Slovenija  (Slovene)FlagCoat of armsAnthem: Zdravljica  A Toast[i]Location of  Slovenia  (dark green) – in Europe  (green & dark grey) – in the European Union  (green)Capital and largest city Ljubljana 46°03′N 14°30′E / 46.050°N 14.500°E / 46.050; 14.500Official languages Slovene[ii]Ethnic groups (2002[4])83% Slovenes 2% Serbs 2% Croats 1% Bosniaks 12% others (including Istrian Italians) / unspecifiedReligion Predominantly ChristianDemonym SloveneGovernment Unitary parliamentary constitutional republic• PresidentBorut Pahor• Prime MinisterMiro Cerar[5]Legislature Parliament• Upper houseNational Council•
[...More...]

"Slovenia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.