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Cornbrash
In geology, Cornbrash was the name applied to the uppermost member of the Bathonian
Bathonian
stage of the Jurassic
Jurassic
formation in England. It is an old English agricultural name applied in Wiltshire
Wiltshire
to a variety of loose rubble or brash which, in that part of the country, forms a good soil for growing corn. The name was adopted by William Smith for a thin band of shelly limestone which, in the south of England, breaks up in the manner indicated. Although only a thin group of rocks (1025 feet c. 300 m), it is remarkably persistent; it may be traced from Weymouth to the Yorkshire
Yorkshire
coast, but in north Lincolnshire it is very thin, and probably dies out in the neighborhood of the Humber. It appears again, however, as a thin bed in Gristhorpe Bay, Cayton Bay, Wheatcroft, Newton Dale and Langdale
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Radipole
Radipole /ˈrædɪpoʊl/ is a part of the district of Weymouth and Portland in the county of Dorset, England. History[edit] It was formerly an independent parish, until abolished as a separate local government unit in 1933. It remains a separate ecclesiastical parish. Radipole stands at the head of, and is named after, the lake, now an RSPB nature reserve, into which the River Wey flows, and which leads into Weymouth Harbour. Until 1984, it had its own halt on the South Western Main Line and Heart of Wessex Line out of Weymouth. There is some evidence of prehistoric occupation, and it is believed that the Romans had a small port or landing stage at the head of the lake. A Romano-British burial site was found nearby when the upper playing field of Southill Primary School was constructed
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Geology
Geology
Geology
(from the Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
γῆ, gē, i.e. "earth" and -λoγία, -logia, i.e. "study of, discourse"[1][2]) is an earth science concerned with the solid Earth, the rocks of which it is composed, and the processes by which they change over time. Geology can also refer to the study of the solid features of any terrestrial planet or natural satellite, (such as Mars
Mars
or the Moon). Geology
Geology
describes the structure of the Earth
Earth
beneath its surface, and the processes that have shaped that structure
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Public Domain
The legal term public domain refers to works whose exclusive intellectual property rights have expired,[1] have been forfeited,[2] have been expressly waived, or are inapplicable.[3] For example, the works of Shakespeare
Shakespeare
and Beethoven, and most early silent films are in the public domain either by virtue of their having been created before copyright existed, or by their copyright term having expired.[1] Some works are not covered by copyright, and are therefore in the public domain—among them the formulae of Newtonian physics, cooking recipes,[4] and all computer software created prior to 1974.[5] Other works are actively dedicated
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Bedfordshire
Bedfordshire
Bedfordshire
(/ˈbɛdfərdʃər, -ʃɪər/; abbreviated Beds.) is a county in the East of England. It is a ceremonial county and a historic county, covered by three unitary authorities: Bedford, Central Bedfordshire, and Luton. Bedfordshire
Bedfordshire
is bordered by Cambridgeshire
Cambridgeshire
to the east/northeast, Northamptonshire
Northamptonshire
to the north, Buckinghamshire
Buckinghamshire
to the west and Hertfordshire
Hertfordshire
to the east/southeast
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Steneosaurus
Steneosaurus
Steneosaurus
is an extinct genus of teleosaurid crocodyliform from the Early Jurassic
Jurassic
to Middle Jurassic
Jurassic
( Toarcian
Toarcian
to Callovian). Fossil specimens have been found in England, France, Germany, Switzerland
Switzerland
and Morocco. The largest species, S. heberti, reached up to 5 m (16.5 ft) long, though 2.5–3.5 m was far more common.[2]Reconstruction of Steneosaurus
Steneosaurus
bollensis Steneosaurus
Steneosaurus
bollensis Steneosaurus
Steneosaurus
heberti skullContents1 Species 2 Evolutionary relationships 3 Niche partitioning 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksSpecies[edit] Species in this genus are traditionally classed into two skull groups: longirostrine (long, narrow jaws) and brevirostrine (short, broad jaws). LongirostrineS
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Saurian
The clade Sauria
Sauria
was traditionally a suborder for lizards which originally (before 1800) comprised crocodilians too. It has been redefined as the group containing the most recent common ancestor of archosaurs and lepidosaurs and all its descendants;[1] as such it was commonly thought that Sauria
Sauria
is a crowned-base grouping of diapsids.[2] However, recent genomic studies[3][4][5] and comprehensive studies in the fossil record[6] suggest that turtles are closely related to archosaurs, not to parareptiles as previously thought
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Belemnite
Belemnitina Belemnopseina Belemnotheutina Belemnitida
Belemnitida
(or belemnites) is an extinct order of cephalopods which existed during the Mesozoic era, from the Hettangian
Hettangian
age of the Lower Jurassic
Jurassic
to the Maastrichtian
Maastrichtian
age of the Upper Cretaceous. The belemnite is the state fossil of Delaware. Description[edit]Fossil guards of belemnites from the Jurassic
Jurassic
of WyomingBelemnites were superficially squid-like. They possessed ten arms of equal length studded with small inward-curving hooks used for grasping prey.[2] However, they lacked the pair of specialized tentacles present in modern squid.[3] Belemnites (and other belemnoids) were distinct from modern squid by possessing hard internal skeletons
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Lincoln, Lincolnshire
Lincoln (/ˈlɪŋkən/ LIN-kən) is a cathedral city and the county town of Lincolnshire
Lincolnshire
in the East Midlands
East Midlands
of England. The non-metropolitan district of Lincoln had a 2012 population of 94,600.[5] The 2011 census gave the urban area of Lincoln, which includes North Hykeham
North Hykeham
and Waddington, a population of 130,200.[6][7] The Roman town of Lindum Colonia
Lindum Colonia
developed from an Iron Age settlement. Lincoln's major landmarks are Lincoln Cathedral, a famous example of English Gothic architecture, and Lincoln Castle, an 11th-century Norman castle
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Sudbrook Park
Sudbrook Park is a historic neighborhood near Pikesville, Maryland located just northwest of the Baltimore City limits in Baltimore County. The community dates to 1889 when it was designed by American landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted, Sr. (1822–1903) and developed by the Sudbrook Company. Known most for designing well-known urban projects like Central Park in New York City, Olmsted conceived this "suburban village" with curved roads and open green spaces, traits that set the community apart from its contemporaries. Two homes in the district were designed by architect George Archer in the Colonial Revival style.[2][3] Sudbrook Park was registered on the National Register of Historic Places in 1973, and from 1993 to 1999 portions of Sudbrook Park became listed as Baltimore County Historic Districts. Today, the community continues to uphold Olmsted's vision through community association regulations
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Peterborough
Peterborough (/ˈpiːtərbrə, -bərə, -ˌbʌrə/ ( listen)) is a cathedral city in Cambridgeshire, England, with a population of 183,631 in 2011.[5] Historically part of Northamptonshire, it is 75 miles (121 km) north of London, on the River Nene which flows into the North Sea 30 miles (48 km) to the north-east. The railway station is an important stop on the East Coast Main Line between London and Edinburgh. The local topography is flat and in some places lies below sea level, for example in the Fens that lie to the east of Peterborough. Human settlement in the area began before the Bronze Age, as can be seen at the Flag Fen archaeological site to the east of the current city centre, also with evidence of Roman occupation
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Witney
Witney
Witney
is a town on the River Windrush, 12 miles (19 km) west of Oxford
Oxford
in Oxfordshire, England. Whilst in the South East, it is in the AON region of Central. The place-name "Witney" is first attested in a Saxon charter of 969 as "Wyttannige"; it appears as "Witenie" in the Domesday Book
Domesday Book
of 1086. The name means "Witta's island".[2]Contents1 Notable buildings 2 Industry 3 Railways3.1 Reopening the railway4 Museums 5 Education 6 Sports 7 Politics 8 Twinning 9 Floods 10 Climate 11 Media 12 Gallery 13 Famous people 14 See also 15 References 16 Sources and further reading 17 External linksNotable buildings[edit] The Church of England
England
parish church of St Mary the Virgin was originally Norman. The north porch and north aisle were added in this style late in the 12th century, and survived a major rebuilding in about 1243
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Cirencester
Cirencester
Cirencester
(/ˈsaɪrənsɛstər/ ( listen), occasionally /ˈsɪstər/ ( listen); see below for more variations)[3] is a market town in east Gloucestershire, England, 93 miles (150 km) west northwest of London. Cirencester
Cirencester
lies on the River Churn, a tributary of the River Thames, and is the largest town in the Cotswold District. It is the home of the Royal Agricultural University, the oldest agricultural college in the English-speaking world, founded in 1840. The town's Corinium Museum
Corinium Museum
is well known for its extensive Roman collection
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Trowbridge
Trowbridge
Trowbridge
(/ˈtroʊbrɪdʒ/ TROH-bridge) is the county town of Wiltshire, England
England
on the River Biss
River Biss
in the west of the county, 8 miles (13 km) south east of Bath, Somerset, from which it is separated by the Mendip Hills, which rise 3 miles (4.8 km) to the west. Long a market town, the Kennet and Avon canal
Kennet and Avon canal
to the north of Trowbridge
Trowbridge
has played an instrumental part in the town's development as it allowed coal to be transported from the Somerset Coalfield
Somerset Coalfield
and so marked the advent of steam-powered manufacturing in woollen cloth mills
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Wincanton
Wincanton
Wincanton
is a small town and electoral ward in South Somerset, southwest England
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Oolite
Oolite
Oolite
or oölite (egg stone) is a sedimentary rock formed from ooids, spherical grains composed of concentric layers. The name derives from the Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
word ᾠόν for egg. Strictly, oolites consist of ooids of 0.25–2 millimetres' diameter; rocks composed of ooids larger than 2 mm are called pisolites. The term oolith can refer to oolite or individual ooids.Contents1 Composition 2 Occurrence 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksComposition[edit] Ooids
Ooids
are most commonly composed of calcium carbonate (calcite or aragonite), but can be composed of phosphate, clays, chert, dolomite or iron minerals, including hematite. Dolomitic and chert ooids are most likely the result of the replacement of the original texture in limestone
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