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Coreidae
Agriopocorinae (disputed) Coreinae Meropachydinae Pseudophloeinae and see text Coreidae
Coreidae
is a large family of predominantly sap-sucking insects in the Hemipteran suborder Heteroptera.[1] The name "Coreidae" derives from the Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
κόρις meaning bedbug.[2] As a family, Coreidae
Coreidae
members are cosmopolitan, but most of the species are tropical or subtropical.Contents1 Common names and significance 2 Morphology and appearance 3 Biology and habits 4 Taxonomy and systematics 5 Gallery 6 References 7 External linksCommon names and significance[edit] The common names of Coreidae
Coreidae
vary regionally. Leaf-footed bug refers to leaf-like expansions on the legs of some species, generally on the hind tibiae
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Tropics
The tropics are a region of the Earth
Earth
surrounding the Equator. They are delimited in latitude by the Tropic of Cancer
Tropic of Cancer
in the Northern Hemisphere at 23°26′12.9″ (or 23.43692°) N and the Tropic of Capricorn
Tropic of Capricorn
in the Southern Hemisphere
Southern Hemisphere
at 23°26′12.9″ (or 23.43692°) S; these latitudes correspond to the axial tilt of the Earth. The tropics are also referred to as the tropical zone and the torrid zone (see geographical zone)
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Wikispecies
Wikispecies
Wikispecies
is a wiki-based online project supported by the Wikimedia Foundation. Its aim is to create a comprehensive free content catalogue of all species; the project is directed at scientists, rather than at the general public
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Genera
A genus (/ˈdʒiːnəs/, pl. genera /ˈdʒɛnərə/) is a taxonomic rank used in the biological classification of living and fossil organisms in biology. In the hierarchy of biological classification, genus comes above species and below family. In binomial nomenclature, the genus name forms the first part of the binomial species name for each species within the genus.E.g. Felis catus
Felis catus
and Felis silvestris
Felis silvestris
are two species within the genus Felis. Felis
Felis
is a genus within the family Felidae.The composition of a genus is determined by a taxonomist. The standards for genus classification are not strictly codified, so different authorities often produce different classifications for genera
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Parasitoid
A parasitoid is an organism that lives in close association with its host and at the host's expense, and which sooner or later kills it. Parasitoidism is one of six major evolutionary strategies within parasitism. Parasitoidism is distinguished by the fatal prognosis for the host, which makes the strategy close to predation. Among parasitoids, strategies range from living inside the host, allowing it to go on growing until the parasitoid emerges as an adult, to paralysing the host and living outside it. Hosts include other parasitoids, resulting in hyperparasitoidism, and in the case of oak galls, up to five levels of parasitism are possible. Some parasitoids influence their host's behaviour in ways that favour the propagation of the parasitoid. Parasitoids are found in a variety of taxa across the endopterygote insects, whose complete metamorphosis may have pre-adapted them for a split lifestyle, with parasitoid larvae and freeliving adults
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Taxonomy (biology)
Taxonomy (from Ancient Greek τάξις (taxis), meaning 'arrangement', and -νομία (-nomia), meaning 'method') is the science of defining and naming groups of biological organisms on the basis of shared characteristics. Organisms are grouped together into taxa (singular: taxon) and these groups are given a taxonomic rank; groups of a given rank can be aggregated to form a super-group of higher rank, thus creating a taxonomic hierarchy. The principal ranks in modern use are domain, kingdom, phylum (division is sometimes used in botany in place of phylum), class, order, family, genus and species
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Tergum
A tergum (Latin for "the back"; plural terga, associated adjective tergal) is the dorsal ('upper') portion of an arthropod segment other than the head. The anterior edge is called the base and posterior edge is called the apex or margin. A given tergum may be divided into hardened plates or sclerites commonly referred to as tergites.[1]:20 For a detailed explanation of the terminology, see [2] Kinorhynchs have tergal and sternal plates too, though seemingly not homologous with those of arthropods.[3] So, for example, in a thoracic segment, the tergum may be divided into an anterior notum and a posterior scutellum
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Median Plane
The median plane also called a mid-sagittal plane is used to describe the sagittal plane as it bisects the body vertically through the midline marked by the navel, dividing the body exactly in left and right side. The term parasagittal plane is used to refer to any plane parallel to the sagittal and median plane. It is one of the lines used to define the right upper quadrant of the human abdomen. The midsternal line can be interpreted as a segment of the median plane. Median plane
Median plane
magnetic resonance imaging of the head. Median plane
Median plane
CT scan
CT scan
of a pregnant woman
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Nymph (biology)
In biology, a nymph is the immature form of some invertebrates, particularly insects, which undergoes gradual metamorphosis (hemimetabolism) before reaching its adult stage.[1] Unlike a typical larva, a nymph's overall form already resembles that of the adult, except for a lack of wings (in winged species). In addition, while a nymph moults it never enters a pupal stage. Instead, the final moult results in an adult insect.[2] Nymphs undergo multiple stages of development called instars. This is the case, for example, in Orthoptera
Orthoptera
(crickets and grasshoppers), Hemiptera
Hemiptera
(cicadas, shield bugs, etc.), mayflies, termites, cockroaches, mantises, stoneflies and Odonata
Odonata
(dragonflies and damselflies).[3] Nymphs of aquatic insects, as in the Odonata, Ephemeroptera, and Plecoptera, are also called naiads, an Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
name for mythological water nymphs
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Robustness
Robustness is the property of being strong and healthy in constitution. When it is transposed into a system, it refers to the ability of tolerating perturbations that might affect the system’s functional body. In the same line Robustness can be defined as "the ability of a system to resist change without adapting its initial stable configuration".[1] "Robustness in the small" refers to situations wherein perturbations are small in magnitude, which considers that the "small" magnitude hypothesis can be difficult to verify because "small" or "large" depends on the specific problem[citation needed]
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Tribe (biology)
In biology, a tribe is a taxonomic rank above genus, but below family and subfamily.[1][2] It is sometimes subdivided into subtribes. In zoology, examples include the tribes Caprini (goat-antelopes), Hominini
Hominini
(hominins), Bombini
Bombini
(bumblebees), and Thunnini
Thunnini
(tunas). The standard ending for the name of a zoological tribe is "-ini". The tribe Hominini
Hominini
is divided into subtribes by some scientists; subtribe Hominina
Hominina
then comprises "humans". The standard ending for the name of a zoological subtribe is "-ina". In botany, examples include the tribes Acalypheae
Acalypheae
and Hyacintheae. The standard ending for the name of a botanical tribe is "-eae". The tribe Hyacintheae is divided into subtribes, including the subtribe Massoniinae
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Cucurbitaceae
See text.The Cucurbitaceae, also called cucurbits and the gourd family, are a plant family consisting of about 965 species in around 95 genera,[2] the most important of which are: Cucurbita
Cucurbita
– squash, pumpkin, zucchini, some gourds Lagenaria
Lagenaria
– calabash, and others that are inedible Citrullus
Citrullus
– watermelon (C. lanatus, C. colocynthis) and others Cucumis
Cucumis
– cucumber (C. sativus), various melons Luffa
Luffa
– the common name is also luffa, sometimes spelled loofah (when fully ripened, two species of this fibrous fruit are the source of the loofah scrubbing sponge)The plants in this family are grown around the tropics and in temperate areas, where those with edible fruits were among the earliest cultivated plants in both the Old and New Worlds
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Squash (plant)
Cucurbita
Cucurbita
( Latin
Latin
for gourd)[3][4] is a genus of herbaceous vines in the gourd family, Cucurbitaceae, also known as cucurbits, native to the Andes
Andes
and Mesoamerica. Five species are grown worldwide for their edible fruit, variously known as squash, pumpkin, or gourd depending on species, variety, and local parlance,[a] and for their seeds. Other kinds of gourd, also called bottle-gourds, are native to Africa and belong to the genus Lagenaria, which is in the same family and subfamily as Cucurbita
Cucurbita
but in a different tribe
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Subtropics
The subtropics are geographic and climate zones located roughly between the tropics at latitude 23.5° (the Tropic of Cancer
Tropic of Cancer
and Tropic of Capricorn) and temperate zones (normally referring to latitudes 35–66.5°) north and south of the Equator. Subtropical climates are often characterized by warm to hot summers and cool to mild winters with infrequent frost
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Ostiole
An ostiole is a small hole or opening through which algae[1] or fungi release their mature spores. The term is also used in higher plants, for example to denote the opening of the involuted fig inflorescence through which fig wasps enter to pollinate and breed. References[edit]^ Fletcher, R.L. 1987. Seaweeds of the British Isles. Volume 3 Fucophyceae (Phaeophyceae) Part 1 p.304 British Museum (Natural History) ISBN 0-565-00992-3This botany article is a stub. You can help by expanding it.v t eThis fungus-related article is a stub
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