HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Coolie Woman
Coolie
Coolie
Woman (full title: Coolie
Coolie
Woman: The Odyssey of Indenture) is a book written by Gaiutra Bahadur<
[...More...]

"Coolie Woman" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Gaiutra Bahadur
Gaiutra Bahadur
Gaiutra Bahadur
is an award-winning Guyanese-American writer. She is best known for Coolie Woman: The Odyssey of Indenture, which was shortlisted for the Orwell Prize in 2014.[1]Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Publications 4 Awards and Recognition 5 External links 6 ReferencesEarly life[edit] Bahadur was born in rural Guyana
Guyana
and emigrated to the US when she was six years old.[2][3] She grew up in Jersey City, New Jersey and earned her bachelor's degree, with honors in English Literature, at Yale University and her master's degree in journalism at Columbia University. Career[edit] Before winning a Nieman Fellowship at Harvard University
Harvard University
when she was 32, she was a staff writer for The Philadelphia Inquirer
The Philadelphia Inquirer
and the Austin American-Statesman
[...More...]

"Gaiutra Bahadur" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Atlantic Slave Trade
The Atlantic slave trade
Atlantic slave trade
or transatlantic slave trade involved the transportation by slave traders of enslaved African people, mainly from Africa
Africa
to the Americas, and then their sale there. The slave trade used mainly the triangular trade route and its Middle Passage, and existed from the 16th to the 19th centuries. The vast majority of those who were enslaved and transported in the transatlantic slave trade were Africans from central and western Africa, who had been sold by other West Africans to Western European slave traders (with a small number being captured directly by the slave traders in coastal raids), who brought them to the Americas.[1] The South Atlantic and Caribbean economies especially were dependent on the supply of secure labour for the production of commodity crops, making goods and clothing to sell in Europe
[...More...]

"Atlantic Slave Trade" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
[...More...]

"Special" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Stabroek News
The Stabroek News is a privately owned newspaper published in Guyana. It was first published in November 1986, first as a weekly but it later changed to a daily print newspaper.[1] The entry of the paper into the mass media in Guyana
Guyana
brought a new openness to the media environment in the country.[2] It was founded by David DeCaires, who died on November 1, 2008.[3] Stabroek News is also the sole distributor of DirecTV
DirecTV
Caribbean in Guyana. There has been some controversy recently as illegal distributors of DirecTV
DirecTV
Caribbean in Guyana
Guyana
have not provided services to those who have paid for it.[4] References[edit]^ Gordon, Ken (1999). Getting It Write: Winning Caribbean Press Freedom. Ian Randle Publishers. p. 88. ^ Surlin, Stuart; Soderlund, Walter C. (1991). Mass Media and the Caribbean. Gordon and Breach. p
[...More...]

"Stabroek News" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Harvard University
Harvard University
Harvard University
is a private Ivy League
Ivy League
research university in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Established in 1636 and named for clergyman John Harvard (its first benefactor), its history, influence, and wealth have made it one of the world's most prestigious universities.[8] Harvard is the United States' oldest institution of higher learning,[9] and the Harvard Corporation
Harvard Corporation
(formally, the President and Fellows of Harvard College) is its first chartered corporation. Although never formally affiliated with any denomination, the early College primarily trained Congregational and Unitarian clergy. Its curriculum and student body were gradually secularized during the 18th century, and by the 19th century, Harvard had emerged as the central cultural establishment among Boston elites.[10][11] Following the American Civil War, President Charles W
[...More...]

"Harvard University" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Nieman Foundation For Journalism
The Nieman Foundation for Journalism
Nieman Foundation for Journalism
at Harvard
Harvard
University is the primary journalism institution at Harvard. It was founded in 1938 as the result of a $1.4 million bequest by Agnes Wahl Nieman, the widow of Lucius W. Nieman, founder of The Milwaukee Journal. She stated the goal was "to promote and elevate the standards of journalism in the United States and educate persons deemed specially qualified for journalism." It is based at Walter Lippmann
Walter Lippmann
House in Cambridge, Massachusetts.Contents1 Programs 2 Awards 3 Curators 4 References 5 External linksPrograms[edit] The Nieman Foundation is best known as home to the Nieman Fellows, a group of journalists from around the world who come to Harvard
Harvard
for a year of study
[...More...]

"Nieman Foundation For Journalism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

NPR
National Public Radio
Radio
(usually shortened to NPR, stylized as npr) is an American privately and publicly funded non-profit membership media organization based in Washington DC. It serves as a national syndicator to a network of over 1,000 public radio stations in the United States.[2] NPR
NPR
produces and distributes news and cultural programming. Individual public radio stations are not required to broadcast all NPR
NPR
programs; most broadcast a mix of NPR
NPR
programs, content from rival providers American Public Media, Public Radio
Radio
International, Public Radio Exchange and WNYC
WNYC
Studios, and locally produced programs
[...More...]

"NPR" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

The Independent
The Independent
The Independent
is a British online newspaper.[2] Established in 1986 as an independent national morning newspaper published in London, it was controlled by Tony O'Reilly's Independent News & Media from 1997 until it was sold to Russian oligarch
[...More...]

"The Independent" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Ethnic And Racial Studies
Ethnic and Racial Studies is a peer-reviewed social science academic journal that publishes scholarly articles and book reviews on anthropology, cultural studies, ethnicity and race, and sociology. The editors-in-chief are Martin Bulmer (University of Surrey) and John Solomos (University of Warwick). According to the Journal Citation Reports, the journal has a 2014 impact factor of 0.956, ranking it 58th out of 142 journals in the category "Sociology", and 5th out of 15 journals in the category "Ethnic Studies".[1] References[edit]^ "Journals Ranked by Impact: Sociology; Ethnic Studies". 2014 Journal Citation Reports. Web of Science
Web of Science
(Social Sciences ed.). Thomson Reuters
[...More...]

"Ethnic And Racial Studies" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

EBSCOhost
EBSCO Information Services, headquartered in Ipswich, Massachusetts, is a division of EBSCO Industries
EBSCO Industries
Inc., the third largest private company in Birmingham, Alabama, with annual sales of nearly $2 billion according to the BBJ's 2013 Book of Lists.[1] EBSCO offers library resources to customers in academic, medical, K–12, public library, law, corporate, and government markets. Its products include EBSCONET, a complete e-resource management system, and EBSCOhost, which supplies a fee-based online research service with 375 full-text databases, a collection of 600,000-plus ebooks, subject indexes, point-of-care medical references, and an array of historical digital archives
[...More...]

"EBSCOhost" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Project Muse
Project MUSE, a non-profit collaboration between libraries and publishers, is an online database of peer-reviewed academic journals[1] and electronic books.[2] Project MUSE provides access to digital humanities and social science content from over 250 university presses and scholarly societies[3] around the world. The goal of Project MUSE is to disseminate high-quality scholarly material through an affordable and sustainable model that meets the needs of libraries, publishers, and scholars. MUSE’s online journal collections are available on a subscription basis to academic, public, special, and school libraries. Currently, more than 2,500 libraries worldwide subscribe to Project MUSE
[...More...]

"Project Muse" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

International Standard Serial Number
An International Standard Serial Number
International Standard Serial Number
(ISSN) is an eight-digit serial number used to uniquely identify a serial publication.[1] The ISSN is especially helpful in distinguishing between serials with the same title. ISSN are used in ordering, cataloging, interlibrary loans, and other practices in connection with serial literature.[2] The ISSN system was first drafted as an International Organization for Standardization (ISO) international standard in 1971 and published as ISO 3297 in 1975.[3] ISO subcommittee TC 46/SC 9 is responsible for maintaining the standard. When a serial with the same content is published in more than one media type, a different ISSN is assigned to each media type. For example, many serials are published both in print and electronic media
[...More...]

"International Standard Serial Number" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Digital Object Identifier
In computing, a Digital Object Identifier or DOI is a persistent identifier or handle used to uniquely identify objects, standardized by the International Organization for Standardization
International Organization for Standardization
(ISO).[1] An implementation of the Handle System,[2][3] DOIs are in wide use mainly to identify academic, professional, and government information, such as journal articles, research reports and data sets, and official publications though they also have been used to identify other types of information resources, such as commercial videos. A DOI aims to be "resolvable", usually to some form of access to the information object to which the DOI refers. This is achieved by binding the DOI to metadata about the object, such as a URL, indicating where the object can be found. Thus, by being actionable and interoperable, a DOI differs from identifiers such as ISBNs and ISRCs which aim only to uniquely identify their referents
[...More...]

"Digital Object Identifier" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

American Studies (journal)
American Studies is a quarterly peer-reviewed academic journal covering issues broadly concerning American culture and international perspectives. The journal is sponsored by the Mid-America American Studies Association and the University of Kansas.[1] In 2005 the journal merged with American Studies International. The editors-in-chief are Sherrie Tucker and Randal Maurice Jelks (University of Kansas). The journal is partially abstracted and indexed in Scopus.[2] References[edit]^ "Journal Sponsorship". American Studies. Kansas University. Retrieved 2011-07-24.  ^ "Content overview". Scopus. Elsevier. Retrieved 2016-10-29. External links[edit]Official website Mid-America American Studies AssociationThis article about a journal on area studies is a stub. You can help by expanding it.v t eSee tips for writing articles about academic journals
[...More...]

"American Studies (journal)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Orwell Prize
The Orwell Prize, based at University College London, is a British prize for political writing of outstanding quality. Three prizes are awarded each year: one for a book and one for journalism and one for 'Exposing Britain's Social Evils' (established 2015); between 2009 and 2012, a third prize was awarded for blogging. In each case, the winner is the short-listed entry which comes closest to George Orwell's own ambition to "make political writing into an art".[1] In 2014, the Youth Orwell Prize was launched, targeted at school years 9 to 13 in order to "support and inspire a new generation of politically engaged young writers".[2] In 2015, The Orwell Prize for Exposing Britain's Social Evils, sponsored and supported by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation, was launched.[3] Bernard Crick founded the prize in 1993, using money from the royalties of the hardback edition of his biography of Orwell
[...More...]

"Orwell Prize" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.