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Cooking
Cooking
Cooking
or cookery is the art, technology, science and craft of preparing food for consumption with or without the use of fire or heat. Cooking
Cooking
techniques and ingredients vary widely across the world, from grilling food over an open fire to using electric stoves, to baking in various types of ovens, reflecting unique environmental, economic, and cultural traditions and trends. The ways or types of cooking also depend on the skill and type of training an individual cook has. Cooking
Cooking
is done both by people in their own dwellings and by professional cooks and chefs in restaurants and other food establishments. Cooking
Cooking
can also occur through chemical reactions without the presence of heat, such as in ceviche, a traditional South American dish where fish is cooked with the acids in lemon or lime juice. Preparing food with heat or fire is an activity unique to humans
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Pig
A pig is any of the animals in the genus Sus, within the even-toed ungulate family Suidae. Pigs include the domestic pig and its ancestor, the common Eurasian wild boar (Sus scrofa), along with other species. Related creatures outside the genus include the peccary, the babirusa, and the warthog. Pigs, like all suids, are native to the Eurasian and African continents
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Phylogenetics
In biology, phylogenetics /ˌfaɪloʊdʒəˈnɛtɪks, -lə-/[1][2] (Greek: φυλή, φῦλον - phylé, phylon = tribe, clan, race + γενετικός - genetikós = origin, source, birth)[3] is the study of the evolutionary history and relationships among individuals or groups of organisms (e.g. species, or populations). These relationships are discovered through phylogenetic inference methods that evaluate observed heritable traits, such as DNA
DNA
sequences or morphology under a model of evolution of these traits. The result of these analyses is a phylogeny (also known as a phylogenetic tree) – a diagrammatic hypothesis about the history of the evolutionary relationships of a group of organisms.[4] The tips of a phylogenetic tree can be living organisms or fossils, and represent the "end", or the present, in an evolutionary lineage
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Helianthus
Harpalium (Cass.) Cass. Helianthus
Helianthus
or sunflower (/ˌhiːliˈænθəs/)[2] is a genus of plants comprising about 70 species[3] in the family Asteraceae.[4] Except for three species in South America, all Helianthus
Helianthus
species are native to North America. The common name, "sunflower", typically refers to the popular annual species Helianthus
Helianthus
annuus, or the common sunflower, whose round flower heads in combination with the ligules look like the sun.[5] This and other species, notably Jerusalem artichoke
Jerusalem artichoke
(H. tuberosus), are cultivated in temperate regions and some tropical regions as food crops for humans, cattle, and poultry, and as ornamental plants.[6] Perennial sunflower species are not as popular for gardens due to their tendency to spread rapidly and become invasive. Whorled sunflowers, H
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Blueberry
See textBlueberries are perennial flowering plants with indigo-colored berries. They are classified in the section Cyanococcus within the genus Vaccinium. Vaccinium
Vaccinium
also includes cranberries, bilberries and grouseberries.[1] Commercial "blueberries" are native to North America, and the "highbush" varieties were not introduced into Europe until the 1930s.[2] Blueberries are usually prostrate shrubs that can vary in size from 10 centimeters (3.9 in) to 4 meters (13 ft) in height. In the commercial production of blueberries, the smaller species are known as "lowbush blueberries" (synonymous with "wild"), while the larger species are known as "highbush blueberries". The leaves can be either deciduous or evergreen, ovate to lanceolate, and 1–8 cm (0.39–3.15 in) long and 0.5–3.5 cm (0.20–1.38 in) broad. The flowers are bell-shaped, white, pale pink or red, sometimes tinged greenish
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Pineapple
The pineapple ( Ananas
Ananas
comosus) is a tropical plant with an edible multiple fruit consisting of coalesced berries, also called pineapples,[2][3] and the most economically significant plant in the Bromeliaceae
Bromeliaceae
family.[4] Pineapples may be cultivated from a crown cutting of the frui
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Pecan
The pecan ( Carya
Carya
illinoinensis) is a species of hickory native to Mexico
Mexico
and the Southern United States.[1][2] Contents1 Name 2 Growth 3 Cultivation3.1 Breeding and selection programs 3.2 Diseases, pests, and disorders4 Nutrition 5 Evol
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Vanilla
Vanilla
Vanilla
is a flavoring derived from orchids of the genus Vanilla, primarily from the Mexican species, flat-leaved vanilla (V. planifolia). The word vanilla, derived from vainilla, the diminutive of the Spanish word vaina (vaina itself meaning sheath or pod), is translated simply as "little pod".[1] Pre-Columbian Mesoamerican
Mesoamerican
people cultivated the vine of the vanilla orchid, called tlilxochitl by the Aztecs. Spanish conquistador Hernán Cortés
Hernán Cortés
is credited with introducing both vanilla and chocolate to Europe in the 1520s.[2] Pollination
Pollination
is required to set the vanilla fruit from which the flavoring is derived
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Chili Pepper
The chili pepper (also chile pepper, chilli pepper, or simply chilli[1]) from Nahuatl
Nahuatl
chīlli Nahuatl pronunciation: [ˈt͡ʃiːli] ( listen)) is the fruit of plants from the genus Capsicum, members of the nightshade family, Solanaceae.[2] They are widely used in many cuisines to add spiciness to dishes
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Bell Pepper
The bell pepper (also known as sweet pepper, pepper or capsicum) /ˈkæpsɪkəm/[1] is a cultivar group of the species Capsicum annuum.[2] Cultivars of the plant produce fruits in different colors, including red, yellow, orange, green, white, and purple. Bell peppers are sometimes grouped with less pungent pepper varieties as "sweet peppers". Peppers are native to Mexico, Central America, and northern South America. Pepper seeds were imported to Spain in 1493, and from there, spread to Europe and Asia. China
China
is the world's largest pepper producer. Preferred growing conditions for bell peppers include warm, moist soil in a temperate range of 21 to 29 °C (70 to 84 °F).[3]Contents1 Nomenclature 2 Colors 3 Nutritional value 4 Production 5 Gallery 6 See also 7 ReferencesNomenclature[edit] The misleading name "pepper" was given by Europeans when Christopher Columbus brought the plant back to Europe
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Tomato
Lycopersicon lycopersicum (L.) H. Karst. Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.[1]The tomato (see pronunciation) is the edible, often red, vegetable of the plant Solanum
Solanum
lycopersicum,[2] commonly known as a tomato plant. The plant belongs to the nightshade family, Solanaceae.[1] The species originated in western South America.[2][3] The Nahuatl
Nahuatl
(Aztec language) word tomatl gave rise to the Spanish word "tomate", from which the English word tomato derived.[3][4] Its use as a cultivated food may have originated with the indigenous peoples of México.[2][5] The Spanish discovered the tomato from their contact with the Aztec peoples during the Spanish colonization of the Americas, then brought it to Europe, and, from there, to other parts of the European colonized world during the 16th century.[2] Tomato
Tomato
is consumed in diverse ways, including raw, as an ingredient in many dishes, sauces, salads, and drinks
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Jean-François Millet
Jean-François Millet
Jean-François Millet
(French: [milɛ]; October 4, 1814 – January 20, 1875) was a French painter and one of the founders of the Barbizon
Barbizon
school in rural France. Millet is noted for his scenes of peasant farmers; he can be categorized as part of the Realism art movement.Contents1 Life and work1.1 Youth 1.2 Paris 1.3 Barbizon1.3.1 The Gleaners 1.3.2 The Angelus1.4 Later years2 Legacy 3 See also 4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksLife and work[edit] Youth[edit]The Sheepfold
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Flint
Flint
Flint
is a hard, sedimentary cryptocrystalline form of the mineral quartz,[1][2] categorized as a variety of chert. It occurs chiefly as nodules and masses in sedimentary rocks, such as chalks and limestones.[3][4] Inside the nodule, flint is usually dark grey, black, green, white or brown in colour, and often has a glassy or waxy appearance. A thin layer on the outside of the nodules is usually different in colour, typically white and rough in texture. From a petrological point of view, "flint" refers specifically to the form of chert which occurs in chalk or marly limestone
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Cattle
Cattle—colloquially cows[note 1]—are the most common type of large domesticated ungulates. They are a prominent modern member of the subfamily Bovinae, are the most widespread species of the genus Bos, and are most commonly classified collectively as Bos
Bos
taurus. Cattle
Cattle
are commonly raised as livestock for meat (beef and veal), as dairy animals for milk and other dairy products, and as draft animals (oxen or bullocks that pull carts, plows and other implements). Other products include leather and dung for manure or fuel
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Anthropologist
An anthropologist is a person engaged in the practice of anthropology. Anthropology
Anthropology
is the study of various aspects of humans within past and present societies.[1][2][3] Social anthropology, cultural anthropology, and philosophical anthropology study the norms and values of societies. Linguistic anthropology studies how language affects social life, while economic anthropology studies human economic behavior. Biological (physical), forensic, and medical anthropology study the biological development of humans, the application of biological anthropology in a legal setting, and the study of diseases and their impacts on humans over time, respectively.Contents1 Education 2 Career 3 Further reading 4 See also 5 ReferencesEducation[edit] Anthropologists usually cover a breadth of topics within anthropology in their undergraduate education, and then proceed to specialize in topics of their own choice at the graduate level
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Lemon
The lemon, Citrus
Citrus
limon (L.) Osbeck, is a species of small evergreen tree in the flowering plant family Rutaceae, native to Asia. The tree's ellipsoidal yellow fruit is used for culinary and non-culinary purposes throughout the world, primarily for its juice, which has both culinary and cleaning uses.[2] The pulp and rind (zest) are also used in cooking and baking
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