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Cookham Lock
Cookham
Cookham
Lock is a lock with weirs situated on the River Thames
River Thames
near Cookham, Berkshire. The lock is set in a lock cut which is one of four streams here and it is surrounded by woods. On one side is Sashes Island and on the other is Mill Island connected to Formosa Island, the largest on the non-tidal Thames. There are several weirs here. Hedsor weir was placed across the old navigation channel in 1837, seven years after the lock was opened. There is a lower weir, and Odney
Odney
weir is on the channel next to Formosa Island. A short distance away from the lock is Odney, with the Odney
Odney
Club situated on an ait. Navigation to the Odney
Odney
Club by boat is possible, but is extremely difficult due to the shallow waters
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River Thames
The River Thames
River Thames
(/tɛmz/ ( listen) TEMZ) is a river that flows through southern England, most notably through London. At 215 miles (346 km), it is the longest river entirely in England
England
and the second longest in the United Kingdom, after the River Severn. It also flows through Oxford
Oxford
(where it is called Isis), Reading, Henley-on-Thames
Henley-on-Thames
and Windsor. The lower reaches of the river are called the Tideway, derived from its long tidal reach up to Teddington Lock. It rises at Thames Head
Thames Head
in Gloucestershire, and flows into the North Sea
North Sea
via the Thames Estuary
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Wind In The Willows
The Wind in the Willows
The Wind in the Willows
is a children's novel by Kenneth Grahame, first published in 1908. Alternately slow moving and fast-paced, it focuses on four anthropomorphised animals in a pastoral version of Edwardian
Edwardian
England. The novel is notable for its mixture of mysticism, adventure, morality and camaraderie, and celebrated for its evocation of the nature of the Thames Valley. In 1908, Grahame retired from his position as secretary of the Bank of England. He moved back to Berkshire, where he had lived as a child, and spent his time by the River Thames
River Thames
doing much as the animal characters in his book do – as the book says, "simply messing about in boats" – and expanding the bedtime stories he had earlier told his son Alastair into a manuscript for the book. The novel was in its 31st printing when playwright A. A. Milne
A. A

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Flash Lock
Early locks were designed with a single gate, known as a flash lock or staunch lock. The earliest European references to what were clearly flash locks were in Roman times.[3]Contents1 Development 2 Paddle and rymer weirs 3 References3.1 BibliographyDevelopment[edit]Sketch map of a flash lock on the River Thames
River Thames
between Whitchurch-on-Thames
Whitchurch-on-Thames
and Pangbourne
Pangbourne
around 1786, showing method of winching a barge up over a weir. Flash locks were common on the Thames above Staines.In England the "gate" was similar to a temporary needle dam: a set of boards, called paddles, supported against the current by upright timbers called rymers which normally kept the level of water above it to navigable levels. Boats moving downstream would wait above the lock until the paddles were removed, which would allow a "flash" of water to pass through, carrying the boats with it
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Eel Buck
An eel buck or eel basket is a type of fish trap that was prevalent in the River Thames
River Thames
in England up to the 20th century. It was used particularly to catch eels, which were a staple part of the London diet. Eel bucks were baskets made of willow wood, and were often strung together in a fishing weir
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Buckinghamshire
Buckinghamshire
Buckinghamshire
(/ˈbʌkɪŋəmʃər/ or /-ʃɪər/), abbreviated Bucks,[1] is a county in South East England
England
which borders Greater London to the south east, Berkshire
Berkshire
to the south, Oxfordshire
Oxfordshire
to the west, Northamptonshire
Northamptonshire
to the north, Bedfordshire
Bedfordshire
to the north east and Hertfordshire
Hertfordshire
to the east. Buckinghamshire
Buckinghamshire
is one of the home counties and towns such as High Wycombe, Amersham, Chesham
Chesham
and the Chalfonts in the east and southeast of the county are parts of the London commuter belt, forming some of the most densely populated parts of the county. Development in this region is restricted by the Metropolitan Green Belt
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Bourne End, Buckinghamshire
Bourne End is a village mostly in the parish of Wooburn
Wooburn
and Bourne End, but also in the parish of Little Marlow, in Buckinghamshire, England. At the 2011 Census the population was listed in the civil parish of Wooburn. The village is near the border with Berkshire, on the north side of the River Thames, close to where the River Wye empties into the Thames.[1]Contents1 History 2 Today2.1 Locale 2.2 Community 2.3 Administration and services3 Leisure 4 Education 5 Religion 6 Shopping 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit] Bourne End's original location is somewhat different from today's established village centre, a half a mile downstream on the River Thames. The name refers to the end of the river (bourne being an Old English term for 'river'), and it would be the mouth of the River Wye that this is derived from
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Cookham Dean
Cookham
Cookham
Dean is a settlement to the west of the village of Cookham
Cookham
in Berkshire, England. It is the highest point of all the Cookhams ( Cookham
Cookham
Rise, Cookham
Cookham
Village and Cookham
Cookham
Dean).Contents1 Commerce 2 Geography 3 Notable residents 4 ReferencesCommerce[edit] Cookham
Cookham
Dean is served by two pubs, Uncle Tom's Cabin and The Jolly Farmer, a restaurant called The Mango Lounge (opened late 2016) at the Chequers and a hotel/inn called The Sanctum on The Green. There are no shops in the village following the closure of the Post Office Stores some years ago
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Kenneth Grahame
Kenneth Grahame
Kenneth Grahame
(/ˈɡreɪ.əm/ GRAY-əm; 8 March 1859 – 6 July 1932) was a Scottish writer, most famous for The Wind in the Willows (1908), one of the classics of children's literature. He also wrote The Reluctant Dragon. Both books were later adapted for stage and film, of which A.A. Milne's Toad of Toad Hall
Toad of Toad Hall
was the first. The Disney films, The Adventures of Ichabod and Mr. Toad
The Adventures of Ichabod and Mr. Toad
and The Reluctant Dragon, have become the best known adaptations.Contents1 Personal life1.1 Early life 1.2 Career 1.3 Marriage and fatherhood 1.4 Death2 Writing 3 Works 4 References 5 Further reading 6 External linksPersonal life[edit]Grahame's birthplace in Castle Street, EdinburghEarly life[edit] Kenneth Grahame
Kenneth Grahame
was born on 8 March 1859 in Edinburgh, Scotland
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Thames Path
The Thames Path is a National Trail following the River Thames from its source near Kemble in Gloucestershire to the Thames Barrier at Charlton, south east London. It is about 184 miles (296 km) long.[1] A path was first proposed in 1948 but it only opened in 1996.[2] The path's entire length can be walked, and some parts can be cycled. Most of the path is on the original towpath but in some places it is not possible at several points where towpath traffic crossed the river using ferries.[3] Apart from Shepperton to Weybridge Ferry, the ferries no longer operate and in places such as Shiplake, Whitchurch-on-Thames and Moulsford, there are diversions away from the towpath. At other places, there are replacement connections such as at Hurley, where the Temple Footbridge was built in 1989. Some parts of the Thames Path, particularly west of Oxford, are subject to flooding during the winter
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Berkshire
Berkshire
Berkshire
(/ˈbɑːrkʃər/, abbreviated Berks, in the 17th century sometimes spelled Barkeshire as it is pronounced) is a county in south east England, west of London
London
and is one of the home counties. It was recognised by the Queen as the Royal County of Berkshire
Berkshire
in 1957 because of the presence of Windsor Castle, and letters patent were issued in 1974.[2][3] Berkshire
Berkshire
is a county of historic origin and is a home county, a ceremonial county and a non-metropolitan county without a county council. The historic boundary to the north of Berkshire
Berkshire
follows the River Thames, from Buscot
Buscot
to Old Windsor
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Stanley Spencer
Sir Stanley Spencer
Stanley Spencer
CBE
CBE
RA (30 June 1891 – 14 December 1959) was an English painter. Shortly after leaving the Slade School of Art, Spencer became well known for his paintings depicting Biblical scenes occurring as if in Cookham, the small village beside the River Thames where he was born and spent much of his life. Spencer referred to Cookham
Cookham
as "a village in Heaven" and in his biblical scenes, fellow-villagers are shown as their Gospel counterparts
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Swan Upping
Swan upping is an annual ceremony in England
England
in which mute swans on the River Thames
River Thames
are rounded up, caught, ringed, and then released. By prerogative right, the British Crown enjoys ownership of all unmarked mute swans in open water. Rights over swans may, however, be granted to a subject by the Crown (accordingly they may also be claimed by prescription.)[1] The ownership of swans in a given body of water was commonly granted to landowners up to the 16th century. The only bodies still to exercise such rights are two livery companies of the City of London. Thus the ownership of swans in the Thames is shared equally among the Crown, the Vintners' Company and the Dyers' Company. Swan upping is the traditional means by which the swans on the Thames are apportioned among the three proprietors. Its main practical purposes today are to conduct a census of swans and check their health
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British National Grid Reference System
The Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
National Grid reference
Grid reference
system is a system of geographic grid references used in Great Britain, distinct from latitude and longitude. It is often called British National Grid (BNG).[1][2] The Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
(OS) devised the national grid reference system, and it is heavily used in their survey data, and in maps based on those surveys, whether published by the Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
or by commercial map producers
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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