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Conversion To Judaism
Conversion to Judaism
Judaism
(Hebrew: גיור‬, giyur) is the religious conversion of non- Jews
Jews
to become members of the Jewish religion and Jewish ethnoreligious community.[1] The procedure and requirements for conversion depend on the sponsoring denomination. A conversion in accordance with the process of a denomination is not a guarantee of recognition by another denomination.[1] A formal conversion is also sometimes undertaken by individuals whose Jewish ancestry is questioned, even if they were raised Jewish, but may not actually be considered Jews
Jews
according to traditional Jewish law.[2] In some cases, a person may forgo a formal conversion to Judaism
Judaism
and adopt some or all beliefs and practices of Judaism
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Jewish Outreach
Jewish outreach
Jewish outreach
is a term sometimes used to translate the Hebrew
Hebrew
word kiruv or keruv (literally, "to draw close" or "in-reach"). Normative Judaism
Judaism
does not actively seek converts, although all denominations do accept those with a sincere commitment
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Conversion Of The Jews
The widespread conversion of the Jews to Christianity
Christianity
is a future event predicted by many Christians, often as an end time event. Some Christian groups consider the conversion of the Jews to be imperative and pressing and make it their mission to bring this about. However, since the Middle Ages, the Christian Church
Christian Church
has formally upheld Constitution pro Judæis (Formal Statement on the Jews), which stated:[1]We decree that no Christian shall use violence to force them [the Jews] to be baptized, so long as they are unwilling and refuse. ...Despite such papal declarations, personal, economic and cultural pressure on the Jews to convert persisted, often stirred by clerics. Persecution
Persecution
and forcible displacements of Jews occurred for many centuries, and were regarded as not inconsistent with the papal bull because there was no "violence to force baptism"
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Russia
Coordinates: 60°N 90°E / 60°N 90°E / 60; 90Russian Federation Росси́йская Федерaция (Russian) Rossiyskaya FederatsiyaFlagCoat of armsAnthem:  "Gosudarstvenny gimn Rossiyskoy Federatsii"  (transliteration) "State Anthem of the Russian Federation"Location of Russia
Russia
(green) Russian-administered Crimea
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Hebrew Language
Hebrew (/ˈhiːbruː/; עִבְרִית, Ivrit [ʔivˈʁit] ( listen) or [ʕivˈɾit] ( listen)) is a Northwest Semitic language native to Israel, spoken by over 9 million people worldwide.[8][9] Historically, it is regarded as the language of the Israelites
Israelites
and their ancestors, although the language was not referred to by the name Hebrew in the Tanakh.[note 1] The earliest examples of written Paleo-Hebrew date from the 10th century BCE.[10] Hebrew belongs to the West Semitic branch of the Afroasiatic language family
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Onkelos
Onkelos (Hebrew: אונקלוס‬), possibly identical to Aquila of Sinope, was a Roman national who converted to Judaism
Judaism
in Tannaic times (c. 35–120 CE). He is considered to be the author of the famous Targum Onkelos
Targum Onkelos
(c. 110 CE).Contents1 Onkelos in the Talmud 2 The Targum
Targum
of Onkelos 3 References 4 See also 5 External links Onkelos in the Talmud[edit] Onkelos is mentioned several times in the Talmud. According to the traditional Jewish sources, he was a prominent Roman nobleman, a nephew of the Roman emperor
Roman emperor
Titus. According to the midrash Tanhuma[1] he was a nephew of Hadrian, and not Titus
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Targum
The targumim (singular: "targum", Hebrew: תרגום‬) were spoken paraphrases, explanations and expansions of the Jewish scriptures (also called the Tanakh) that a rabbi would give in the common language of the listeners, which was then often Aramaic. That had become necessary near the end of the 1st century BCE, as the common language was in transition and Hebrew was used for little more than schooling and worship.[1] The noun "Targum" is derived from the early semitic quadriliteral root trgm, and the Akkadian term targummanu refers to "translator, interpreter".[2] It occurs in the Hebrew Bible in Ezra 4:7 "..
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Outline Of Judaism
Outline may refer to: Outline (list), a document summary, in hierarchical list format Outline (software), a note-taking application Outline drawing, a sketch depicting the outer edges of a person or object, without interior details or shading
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Zera Yisrael
Zera Yisrael (Hebrew: זרע ישראל‬, pronounced [zeˈra jisraˈʔel], meaning "Seed [of] Israel") is a legal category in halakha, Jewish religious law, that denotes the blood descendants of Jews
Jews
who, for one reason or another, are not legally Jewish according to religious criteria.[1][2][3] See also[edit]Anusim Baalei teshuva Half-JewishReferences[edit]^ Maltz, Judy (February 19, 2015). "How a Former Netanyahu Aide Is Boosting Israel's Jewish Majority, One 'Lost Tribe' at a Time". Haaretz. Retrieved March 21, 2016.  ^ Amsalem, Haim (July 27, 2011). "We need to embrace 'zera Yisrael'". The Jerusalem Post. Retrieved March 21, 2016.  ^ Student, Gil (January 30, 2011). "Half Jewish". Torah Musings. Retrieved March 21, 2016. This Judaism-related article is a stub
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Reverse Marranos
Reverse Marranos (RMs) are Charedim
Charedim
who appear to live a Charedi lifestyle but do not believe in the core beliefs associated with that lifestyle.[1] Although Hebrew-speaking RMs often use the term Anusim to describe themselves, RMs in the diaspora more commonly self-identify as RM. Since the advent of the Internet, RMs tend to converse and support each other online within social media groups and on web-based forums.[2] Because of the secrecy inherent in maintaining an RM lifestyle, the number of RMs individuals is difficult to gauge, and estimates range from several hundred to several thousand worldwide.[2] References[edit]^ Fader, Ayala (2014). "Anthropology and History". American Jewish History. 98 (1): 1–8. doi:10.1353/ajh.2014.0003.  ^ a b "Undercover atheists". aeon. Retrieved 20 March 2015. External links[edit]This article's use of external links may not follow's policies or guidelines
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Jewish Orphans Controversy
The Jewish orphans controversy was a dispute about the custody of Jewish children after the end of World War II. Some Jewish children had been baptized while in the care of Catholic institutions or individual Catholics during the war. Such baptisms allowed children to be identified as Catholics to avoid deportation and incarceration in concentration camps, and likely death in the Holocaust
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Ethnoreligion
In religious studies, an ethnic religion (or indigenous religion) is a religion associated with a particular ethnic group. Ethnic religions are often distinguished from religions which claim to not be limited in ethnic or national scope, such as Christianity or Islam.[1] Ethnic religions are not only independent religions. Some localised denominations of global religions are practised solely by certain ethnic groups
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Proselytization And Counter-proselytization Of Jews
A number of religious groups, particularly Christians and Muslims, are involved in proselytization of Jews, attempts to recruit, or "missionize" Jews
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Apostasy In Judaism
In Judaism, apostasy refers to the rejection of Judaism
Judaism
and possible defection to another religion by a Jew.[1] The term apostasy is derived from Ancient Greek: ἀποστάτης, meaning "rebellious"[2] (Hebrew: מרד‬.[3]) Equivalent expressions for apostate in Hebrew that are used by rabbinical scholars include mumar (מומר‬, literally "the one that was changed"), poshea Yisrael (פושע ישראל‬, literally, "transgressor of Israel"), and kofer (כופר‬, literally "denier").[3] Similar terms are meshumad (משומד‬, lit
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Shabbat
Shabbat
Shabbat
(/ʃəˈbɑːt/; Hebrew: שַׁבָּת‎ [ʃa'bat], "rest" or "cessation") or Shabbos (['ʃa.bəs], Yiddish: שבת‎) or the Sabbath
Sabbath
is Judaism's day of rest and seventh day of the week, on which religious Jews, Samaritans and certain Christians (such as Seventh-day Adventists and Seventh Day Baptists) remember the Biblical creation of the heavens and the earth in six days and the Exodus of the Hebrews, and look forward to a future Messianic Age. Shabbat
Shabbat
observance entails refraining from work activities, often with great rigor, and engaging in restful activities to honor the day. Judaism's traditional position is that unbroken seventh-day Shabbat
Shabbat
originated among the Jewish people, as their first and most sacred institution, though some suggest other origins
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Jewish Prayer
Jewish prayer
Jewish prayer
(Hebrew: תְּפִלָּה‬, tefillah [tefiˈla]; plural Hebrew: תְּפִלּוֹת‬, tefillot [tefiˈlot]; Yiddish תּפֿלה tfile [ˈtfɪlə], plural תּפֿלות tfilles [ˈtfɪləs]; Yinglish: davening /ˈdɑːvənɪŋ/ from Yiddish דאַוון daven ‘pray’) are the prayer recitations and Jewish meditation traditions that form part of the observance of Rabbinic Judaism. These prayers, often with instructions and commentary, are found in the siddur, the traditional Jewish prayer
Jewish prayer
book
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