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Control Pitcher
In baseball, a control pitcher, also known as a finesse pitcher, is a pitcher who succeeds mostly by using accurate pitches, as opposed to a power pitcher who relies on velocity. By issuing a below average number of bases on balls he exhibits good control of his pitches.[1] Pitchers with good control are said to be able to throw all the pitches in their repertoire for strikes in different locations regardless of the batter, count and score. According to Curt Schilling, "Control is the ability to throw strikes, and command is the ability to throw quality strikes."[2] Another definition of control is "The ability to deliver the ball to the plate with accuracy."[3] The best control pitchers will walk as few as one batter per game
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Ferguson Jenkins
Ferguson Arthur "Fergie" Jenkins Jr. CM (born December 13, 1942)[1] is a Canadian former professional baseball player. He was a Major League Baseball
Baseball
(MLB) pitcher for the Philadelphia Phillies, Chicago
Chicago
Cubs, Texas Rangers, and Boston Red Sox, from 1965 through 1983. He also played basketball in the off-season for the Harlem Globetrotters
Harlem Globetrotters
from 1967 to 1969, and pitched two seasons in Canada for the minor league London Majors
London Majors
following his major league career.[2] In 1991, Jenkins became the first Canadian to be inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame.[3] Jenkins played the majority of his career for the Cubs. He was a National League
National League
(NL) and Cubs All-Star for three seasons, and in 1971, he was the first Canadian and Cubs pitcher to win a Cy Young
Cy Young
Award
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Defense (sports)
In many team sports, defence or defense is the action of preventing an opponent from scoring. The term may also refer to the tactics involved in defense, or a sub-team whose primary responsibility is defense. Similarly, a defense player or defender is a player who is generally charged with preventing the other team's forwards from being able to bear down directly on their own team's goalkeeper or goaltender. Such intentions exist in association football, ice hockey, water polo and many other sports.Contents1 By sport1.1 American football 1.2 Association football 1.3 Ice hockey 1.4 Water polo 1.5 Baseball2 See alsoBy sport[edit]This section needs expansion. You can help by adding to it. (December 2010)American football[edit] Main article: Defense (American football) Association football[edit] Main article: Defender (association football) Ice hockey[edit] Main article: Defenceman In ice hockey, there are normally two defencemen on the ice
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Cleanup Hitter
In baseball, a cleanup hitter is the fourth hitter in the lineup. They are the ones with the most power in the team and their most important job is to bring runs in, the cleanup hitter “cleans up the bases” meaning that if there are runners on the bases the cleanup hitter scores them in ergo the name. There is a whole theory on how a coach sets up his lineup card before the game so he gets the best outcome of his players during the game.[1]Contents1 Theory 2 Trends 3 American League
American League
vs. National League 4 Examples4.1 Current 4.2 Clean Up Batter Examples5 ReferencesTheory[edit] The theory behind the use of the cleanup hitter is that at least one of the batters before him should reach a base in a way possible, usually being a walk or a base hit
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Bases On Balls
A base on balls (BB), also known as a walk, occurs in baseball when a batter receives four pitches that the umpire calls balls, and is in turn awarded first base without the possibility of being called out. The base on balls is defined in Section 2.00 of baseball's Official Rules,[1] and further detail is given in 6.08(a).[2] It is, however, considered a faux pas for a professional player to actually walk to first base; the batter-runner and any advancing runners normally jog on such a play.[3][4] The term "base on balls" distinguishes a walk from the other manners in which a batter can be awarded first base without liability to be put out (e.g., hit by pitch (HBP), catcher's interference).[5] Though a base on balls, catcher's interference, or a batter hit by a pitched ball all result in the batter (and possibly runners on base) being awarded a base,[6] the term "walk" usually refers only to a base on balls, and not the other methods of reaching base without the bat touching the ball
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Pitch (baseball)
In baseball, a pitch is the act of throwing a baseball toward home plate to start a play. The term comes from the Knickerbocker Rules. Originally, the ball had to be literally "pitched" underhand, as with pitching horseshoes. Overhand throwing was not allowed until 1884. The biomechanics of pitching have been studied extensively. The phases of throwing include windup, early cocking, late cocking, early acceleration, late acceleration, deceleration, and follow-through.[1] Pitchers throw a variety of pitches, each of which has a slightly different velocity, trajectory, movement, hand position, wrist position and/or arm angle. These variations are introduced to confuse the batter in various ways, and ultimately aid the defensive team in getting the batter or baserunners out. To obtain variety, and therefore enhance defensive baseball strategy, the pitcher manipulates the grip on the ball at the point of release
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Curt Schilling
Curtis Montague Schilling (born November 14, 1966) is an American former Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
right-handed pitcher, former video game developer, and former baseball color analyst. He helped lead the Philadelphia Phillies
Philadelphia Phillies
to the World Series
World Series
in 1993, and won championships in 2001 with the Arizona Diamondbacks
Arizona Diamondbacks
and in 2004 and 2007 with the Boston
Boston
Red Sox. Schilling retired with a career postseason record of 11–2, and his .846 postseason winning percentage is a major-league record among pitchers with at least ten decisions.[1] He is a member of the 3,000-strikeout club and has the highest strikeout-to-walk ratio of any of its members
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Strikeout-to-walk Ratio
In baseball statistics, strikeout-to-walk ratio (K/BB) is a measure of a pitcher's ability to control pitches, calculated as strikeouts divided by bases on balls. A pitcher who possesses a great K/BB ratio is usually a dominant power pitcher, such as Randy Johnson, Pedro Martínez, Curt Schilling, or Mariano Rivera. However, in 2005, Minnesota Twins
Minnesota Twins
starting pitcher Carlos Silva easily led the major leagues in K/BB ratio with 7.89:1, despite striking out only 71 batters over 188⅓ innings pitched; he walked only nine batters.[1] The player with the highest regular season K/BB ratio is Minnesota Twins pitcher Phil Hughes
Phil Hughes
in 2014, with a ratio of 11.6 (186 strikeouts and 16 walks),[2] A hit by pitch is not counted statistically as a walk and therefore not counted in the strikeout-to-walk ratio. References[edit]^ "MLB Player Pitching Stats -2005". ESPN
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Strikeout
In baseball or softball, a strikeout (or strike-out) occurs when a batter racks up three strikes during a time at bat. It usually means the batter is out. A strikeout is a statistic recorded for both pitchers and batters, and is denoted by K.[1] Although a strikeout suggests that the pitcher dominated the batter, the free-swinging style that generates home runs also leaves batters susceptible to striking out. Some of the greatest home run hitters of all time — such as Alex Rodriguez, Reggie Jackson, and Sammy Sosa — were notorious for striking out.Contents1 Rules 2 History 3 Jargon and slang 4 More than three strikeouts in an inning 5 Strikeout
Strikeout
records5.1 Pitchers 5.2 Batters 5.3 Games6 See also 7 References 8 External linksRules[edit] A pitched ball is ruled a ball by the umpire if the batter did not swing at it and, in that umpire's judgement, it does not pass through the strike zone
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Christy Mathewson
As playerNew York Giants (1900–1916) Cincinnati Reds
Cincinnati Reds
(1916)As manager Cincinnati Reds
Cincinnati Reds
(1916–1918)Career highlights and awards2× World Series
World Series
champion (1905, 1921) 2× Triple Crown (1905, 1908) 4× NL wins leader (1905, 1907, 1908, 1910) 5× NL ERA leader (1905, 1908, 1909, 1911, 1913) 5× NL strikeout leader (1903–1905, 1907, 1908) Pitched two no-hitters Name honored by the Giants Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
All-Century TeamMember of the National Baseball
Baseball
Hall of Fame Induction 1936Vote 90.7% (first ballot)Christy MathewsonCareer informationPosition(s) FullbackCollege BucknellHigh school Keystone AcademyCareer historyAs player1898 Greensburg A
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Offense (sports)
In sports, offense (US) or offence (Can.) (see spelling differences; pronounced with first-syllable stress; from Latin offensus), also known as attack, is the action of attacking or engaging an opposing team with the objective of scoring points or goals. The term may refer to the tactics involved in offense, or a sub-team whose primary responsibility is offense. Generally, goals are scored by teams' offenses, but in sports such as American football
American football
it is common to see defenses and special teams (which serve as a team's offensive unit on kicking plays and defensive on returning plays) score as well. The fielding side in cricket is also generally known as the bowling attack despite the batting side being the side that scores runs
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3000 Strikeout Club
In Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
(MLB), the 3,000 strikeout club
3,000 strikeout club
is the group of pitchers who have struck out 3,000 or more batters in their careers. Walter Johnson
Walter Johnson
was the first to reach 3,000, doing so in 1923, and was the only pitcher at this milestone for 50 years until Bob Gibson
Bob Gibson
recorded his 3,000th strikeout in 1974
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Position Player
Position is a location (rather than orientation) of an entity. Position may also refer to:A job or occupationContents1 Games and recreation 2 Human body 3 Humanities, law, economics and politics 4 Science and mathematics 5 Other uses 6 See alsoGames and recreation[edit] Position (poker), location relative to the dealer
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Fourth Outfielder
In baseball, a fourth outfielder is a backup outfielder, who does not have the hitting skills to regularly play in the corner outfield, but does not have the fielding skills to play center field; for these players, this often leads to playing time that has been called "erratic and unpredictable".[1] Often, fourth outfielders are outfield prospects who have not settled on one outfield position when arriving in the Major Leagues,[2] veteran players seeking additional playing time to extend their careers,[3][4] or part-time position players who double as designated hitters.[1] A current example would be Gerardo Parra
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Utility Infielder
A utility infielder (UI) is a baseball player, usually one who does not have a regular starting role on the team and who is capable of playing more than one of the four defensive infield positions:[1] second base, third base, shortstop, and less typically first base. Utility infielders are generally considered excellent defensive players who do not hit well enough to remain in the starting lineup,[2] but can fill in at multiple defensive positions to give the various starters a rest, or replace a starter late in a game to provide improved defense when the team is winning. Examples of current utility infielders include Luis Valbuena, Jed Lowrie, Brock Holt, Ben Zobrist, Javier Báez, Brendan Ryan and Marwin González. References[edit]^ Simon, Thomas P. (2004). Deadball stars of the National League. Brassey's. p. 173. ISBN 1-57488-860-9.  ^ Swaine, Rick (2004). Beating the breaks: major league ballplayers who overcame disabilities (2 ed.). McFarland
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Baseball
Baseball
Baseball
is a bat-and-ball game played between two opposing teams who take turns batting and fielding. The game proceeds when a player on the fielding team, called the pitcher, throws a ball which a player on the batting team tries to hit with a bat. The objectives of the offensive team (batting team) are to hit the ball into the field of play, and to run the bases - having its runners advance counter-clockwise around four bases to score what are called "runs". The objective of the defensive team (fielding team) is to prevent batters from becoming runners, and to prevent runners' advance around the bases.[1] A run is scored when a runner legally advances around the bases in order and touches home plate (the place where the player started as a batter). The team who scores the most runs by the end of the game is the winner. The first objective of the batting team is to have a player reach base safely
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