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Conrad I, Count Of Württemberg
Conrad I of Württemberg ("Konrad von Wirtinisberc, C(u) onradus de Wirdeberch") was the first ruler of the castle of Wirtemberg 1083-1110, and is first mentioned in 1081. He is considered to be founder of the Württemberg dynasty. Conrad was the son of a nobleman, von Beutelsbach, and possibly a descendant of the Salic duke Conrad of Carinthia. His brother was Bruno von Beutelsbach (1105–1120), prior of the Abbey of Hirsau. His wife's name was Werntrud. About 1083 Conrad built a castle on the Wirtemberg close to today's Stuttgart. He made this place his domicile and named himself after it. Under his new name Conrad was a witness some time between 1089-1092 to the so-called Bempflinger Vertrag (treaty) of the counts Kuno and Liutold von Achalm with their nephew count Wernher von Grüningen. On May 5, 1092 in Ulm
Ulm
he witnessed the transfer of property to the Abbey of Allerheiligen near Schaffhausen
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Rulers Of Württemberg
This article lists the Counts, Dukes, Electors, and Kings who ruled over different territories named Württemberg
Württemberg
from the beginning of the County of Württemberg
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Salian Dynasty
The Salian dynasty
Salian dynasty
(German: Salier; also known as the Frankish dynasty after the family's origin and position as dukes of Franconia) was a dynasty in the High Middle Ages. The dynasty provided four German Kings (1024–1125), all of whom went on to be crowned Holy Roman Emperor (1027–1125); as such, the term Salic dynasty is also used to refer to the Holy Roman Empire
Holy Roman Empire
of the time as a separate term. After the death of the last Saxon of the Ottonian Dynasty
Dynasty
in 1024, the elective titles of King of the Germans
King of the Germans
and then three years later Holy Roman Emperor both passed to the first monarch of the Salian dynasty in the person of Conrad II, the only son of Count Henry of Speyer
Henry of Speyer
and Adelheid of Alsace (both territories in the Franconia of the day)
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Conrad I, Duke Of Carinthia
Conrad I (c. 975 – 12 or 15 December 1011), a member of the Salian dynasty, was Duke of Carinthia from 1004 until his death. Biography[edit] He was the third son of Duke Otto I of Carinthia (d. 1004),[1] who at the time of his birth ruled the Wormsgau
Wormsgau
in Rhenish Franconia. Conrad thereby was the younger brother of Count Henry of Speyer
Henry of Speyer
(d. about 990), the father of the first Salian emperor Conrad II, and of Bruno (d. 999), who prepared for an ecclesiastical career and became the first German Pope
Pope
as Gregory V in 996. Their Salian grandfather Conrad the Red had been a loyal supporter of King Otto I of Germany and in turn was enfeoffed with the Duchy of Lotharingia
Lotharingia
(Lorraine) in 944. He built close relations with the ruling Ottonian dynasty
Ottonian dynasty
by marrying the king's daughter Liutgarde in 947
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Abbey Of Hirsau
Hirsau
Hirsau
Abbey, formerly known as Hirschau Abbey, was once one of the most important Benedictine abbeys of Germany. It is located in the Hirsau
Hirsau
borough of Calw
Calw
on the northern slopes of the Black Forest mountain range, in the present-day state of Baden-Württemberg. In the 11th and 12th century, the monastery was a centre of the Cluniac Reforms, implemented as " Hirsau
Hirsau
Reforms" in the German lands. The complex was devastated during the War of the Palatine Succession in 1692 and not rebuilt.Contents1 History1.1 St Aurelius 1.2 Sts Peter and Paul2 Burials at Hirsau
Hirsau
Abbey 3 Galleries 4 Notes 5 Sources and references 6 External linksHistory[edit] St Aurelius[edit] A Christian chapel at Hirsau
Hirsau
dedicated to Saint Nazarius had already been erected in the late 8th century
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Stuttgart
Stuttgart
Stuttgart
(/ˈʃtʊtɡɑːrt/ SHTUUT-gart;[4] German: [ˈʃtʊtɡaʁt] ( listen); Swabian: Schduagert, pronounced [ˈʒ̊d̥ua̯ɡ̊ɛʕd̥]; names in other languages) is the capital and largest city of the German state of Baden-Württemberg. Stuttgart is located on the Neckar
Neckar
river in a fertile valley known locally as the " Stuttgart
Stuttgart
Cauldron." It lies an hour from the Swabian Jura
Swabian Jura
and the Black Forest. Its urban area has a population of 609,219,[5] making it the sixth largest city in Germany.[6] 2.7 million people live in the city's administrative region[7] and another 5.3 million people in its metropolitan area,[8] making it the fourth largest metropolitan area in Germany
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Ulm
Ulm
Ulm
(German pronunciation: [ˈʔʊlm] ( listen)) is a city in the federal German state of Baden-Württemberg, situated on the River Danube. The city, whose population is estimated at almost 120,000 (2015), forms an urban district of its own (German: Stadtkreis) and is the administrative seat of the Alb-Donau district. Founded around 850, Ulm
Ulm
is rich in history and traditions as a former free imperial city (German: freie Reichsstadt). Today, it is an economic centre due to its varied industries, and it is the seat of the University of Ulm
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All Saints' Abbey (Switzerland)
Kloster Allerheiligen (All Saints abbey) is a former Benedictine monastery in the Swiss municipality of Schaffhausen
Schaffhausen
in the Canton of Schaffhausen. The church Münster Allerheiligen is the oldest building in Schaffhausen, and houses also the Museum
Museum
zu Allerheiligen.Contents1 Geography 2 History 3 Convent buildings 4 Münster Schaffhausen 5 Bibliothek am Münsterplatz 6 Museum
Museum
zu Allerheiligen 7 Facilities 8 Cultural heritage of national importance 9 Literature 10 References 11 External linksGeography[edit] Today the convent houses the Museum
Museum
zu Allerheiligen, an art museum and a natural history museum, the monastery garden, and the buildings of the former convent, including the library
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Schaffhausen
Schaffhausen
Schaffhausen
(German: [ˈʃafˌhaʊzn̩] ( listen); Alemannic German: Schafuuse[citation needed]; French: Schaffhouse; Italian: Sciaffusa; Romansh: Schaffusa; English: Shaffhouse) is a town with historic roots, a municipality in northern Switzerland, and the capital of the canton of the same name; it has an estimated population of 36,000 as of December 2016[update]. It is located right next to the shore of the High Rhine; it is one of four Swiss towns located on the northern side of the Rhine, along with Neuhausen a. Rhf., the historic Neunkirch
Neunkirch
and Stein a. Rh. The old portion of the town has many fine Renaissance
Renaissance
era buildings decorated with exterior frescos and sculpture, as well as the old canton fortress, the Munot. Schaffhausen
Schaffhausen
is also a railway junction of Swiss and German rail networks
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Henry IV, Holy Roman Emperor
Henry IV (German: Heinrich IV; 11 November 1050 – 7 August 1106) ascended to King of the Germans[1] in 1056.[2] From 1084 until his forced abdication in 1105, he was also referred to as the King of the Romans and Holy Roman Emperor. He was the third emperor of the Salian dynasty and one of the most powerful and important figures of the 11th century. His reign was marked by the Investiture Controversy
Investiture Controversy
with the Papacy, and he was excommunicated five times by three different popes. Civil wars over his throne took place in both Italy and Germany
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Bishop Of Worms
The Bishopric of Worms, or Prince-Bishopric
Prince-Bishopric
of Worms, was an ecclesiastical principality of the Holy Roman Empire. Located on both banks of the Rhine
Rhine
around Worms just north of the union of that river with the Neckar, it was largely surrounded by the Electorate of the Palatinate. Worms had been the seat of a bishop from Roman times. From the High Middle Ages
Middle Ages
on, the prince-bishops secular jurisdiction no longer included the city of Worms, which was an Imperial Free City
Imperial Free City
and which became officially Protestant during the Reformation. The prince-bishops however retained jurisdiction over the Cathedral of Worms inside the city. In 1795 Worms itself, as well as the entire territory of the prince-bishopric on the left bank of the Rhine, was occupied and annexed by France
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Bishop Of Constance
The Bishopric of Constance, or Prince-Bishopric
Prince-Bishopric
of Constance, (German: Hochstift Konstanz, Fürstbistum Konstanz) was a Prince-Bishopric
Prince-Bishopric
and Imperial Estate of the Holy Roman Empire
Holy Roman Empire
from the mid–12th century until its secularisation in 1802–1803
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Gift Register
The gift register (German: Schenkungsbuch) of an abbey or monastery was a record of the properties forming its estate, the majority of which came from gifts (Schenkungen). The register served as proof of the legitimacy of these properties and thus provided some security and protection for them. As a rule, the register comprised transcripts of the original documents, not the deed itself, as in the case of the sometimes protocular tradition books. In order to facilitate the management of the estate, documents spanning several centuries were often organised geographically. The entries were kept up-to-date over a longer period of time.Contents1 Reichenbach Gift Register 2 Gift register of Lorsch Abbey 3 Gift register of Hirsau Abbey 4 Literature 5 See also 6 External linksReichenbach Gift Register[edit] The Reichenbach Gift Register (Reichenbacher Schenkungsbuch) belonging to Reichenbach Abbey in the Northern Black Forest was preserved in three volumes: first the St
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Swabia
Swabia
Swabia
(/ˈsweɪbiə/;[1] German: Schwaben, colloquially Schwabenland or Ländle; in English also archaic Suabia or Svebia) is a cultural, historic and linguistic region in southwestern Germany. The name is ultimately derived from the medieval Duchy of Swabia, one of the German stem duchies, representing the territory of Alemannia, whose inhabitants interchangeably were called Alemanni or Suebi. This territory would include all of the Alemannic German
Alemannic German
area, but the modern concept of Swabia
Swabia
is more restricted, due to the collapse of the duchy of Swabia
Swabia
in the thirteenth century
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Konrad II, Count Of Württemberg
Konrad II (died 1143) was Count
Count
of Württemberg. He reigned from 1110 until 1143.[1] He served as marshal of Swabia[2] and advocate of the town of Ulm, and had large possessions in the valleys of the Neckar and the Rems.[3] Konrad's father is unknown, but he is believed to belong to the family of the counts of Veringen (Veringenstadt). The reason to believe so is due to the similarity of the arms of the Counts of Veringen with that of the Counts of Wirtemberg. Thus it is generally assumed that both noble families are related to each other. Konrad's mother Luitgard of Beutelsbach
Beutelsbach
was a sister of his predecessor Konrad I. After the death of Konrad I, he assumed power as heir of castle Wirtemberg
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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