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Connective Tissue Growth Factor
NM_001901NM_010217RefSeq (protein)NP_001892NP_034347Location (UCSC) Chr 6: 131.95 – 131.95 Mb Chr 10: 24.6 – 24.6 Mb PubMed
PubMed
search [3] [4]WikidataView/Edit Human View/Edit MouseCTGF, also known as CCN2 or connective tissue growth factor,[5][6] is a matricellular protein of the CCN family of extracellular matrix-associated heparin-binding proteins (see also CCN intercellular signaling protein).[7][8][9] CTGF
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Gene Nomenclature
Gene
Gene
nomenclature is the scientific naming of genes, the units of heredity in living organisms
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Ovarian Follicle
An ovarian follicle is a roughly spheroid cellular aggregation set found in the ovaries. It secretes hormones that influence stages of the menstrual cycle. Women begin puberty with about 400,000 follicles,[1] each with the potential to release an egg cell (ovum) at ovulation for fertilization.[2] These eggs are developed once every menstrual cycle.Contents1 Structure1.1 Oocyte 1.2 Cumulus oophorus 1.3 Membrana granulosa1.3.1 Granulosa cell1.4 Theca of follicle2 Development2.1 Development of oocytes in ovarian follicles3 Clinical significance 4 Additional images 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksStructure[edit]Section of vesicular ovarian follicle of cat
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Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor
1AJJ, 1D2J, 1F5Y, 1HJ7, 1HZ8, 1I0U, 1IJQ, 1LDL, 1LDR, 1N7D, 1XFE, 2FCW, 2KRI, 2LGP, 2W2M, 2W2N, 2W2O, 2W2P, 2W2Q, 3BPS, 3GCW, 3GCX, 3M0C, 3SO6, 2M7P, 2MG9, 3P5B, 3P5C, 4NE9IdentifiersAliases LDLR, FH, FHC, LDLCQ2, low density lipoprotein receptorExternal IDs OMIM: 606945 MGI: 96765 HomoloGene: 55469 GeneCards: LDLRGene location (Human)Chr. Chromosome 19 (human)[1]Band 19p13.2 Start 11,089,362 bp[1]End 11,133,816 bp[1]Gene location (Mouse)Chr. Chromosome 9 (mouse)[2]Band 9 A39 7.87 cM Start 21,723,483 bp[2]End 21,749,919 bp[2]RNA expression patternMore reference expression dataGene ontologyMolecular function • calcium ion binding • clathrin heavy chain binding • virus receptor activity • glycoprotein binding • protease binding • protein binding • identical protein binding • very-low-density lipoprotein particle receptor activity • low-density lipoprotein receptor ac
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Aggrecan
4MD4IdentifiersAliases ACAN, AGC1, AGCAN, CSPG1, CSPGCP, MSK16, SEDK, Aggrecan, SSOAODExternal IDs HomoloGene: 136177 GeneCards: ACAN Gene
Gene
location (Human)Chr. Chromosome
Chromosome
15 (human)[1]Band 15q26.1 Start 88,803,443 bp[1]End 88,87
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Fibronectin
1E88, 1E8B, 1FBR, 1FNA, 1FNF, 1FNH, 1J8K, 1O9A, 1OWW, 1Q38, 1QGB, 1QO6, 1TTF, 1TTG, 2CG6, 2CG7, 2CK2, 2CKU, 2EC3, 2FN2, 2FNB, 2GEE, 2H41, 2H45, 2HA1, 2OCF, 2RKY, 2RKZ, 2RL0, 3CAL, 3EJH, 3GXE, 3M7P, 3MQL, 3R8Q, 3ZRZ, 4GH7, 4JE4, 4JEG, 4LXO, 4MMX, 4MMY, 4MMZ, 4PZ5, 2N1K, 5DC4, 5DC0, 5DC9, 3T1WIdentifiersAliases FN1, CIG, ED-B, FINC, FN, FNZ, GFND, GFND2, LETS, MSF, fibronectin 1, SMDCFExternal IDs OMIM: 135600 MGI: 95566 HomoloGene: 1533 GeneCards: FN1 Gene
Gene
location (Human)Chr.
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Perlecan
3SH4, 3SH5IdentifiersAliases HSPG2, HSPG, PLC, PRCAN, SJA, SJS, SJS1, heparan sulfate proteoglycan 2External IDs OMIM: 142461 MGI: 96257 HomoloGene: 68473 GeneCards: HSPG2Gene location (Human)Chr. Chromosome 1 (human)[1]Band 1p36.12 Start 21,822,245 bp[1]End 21,937,297 bp[1]Gene location (Mouse)Chr. Chromosome 4 (mouse)[2]Band 4 D34 69.93 cM Start 137,468,769 bp[2]End 137,570,630 bp[2]RNA expression patternMore reference expression dataGene ontologyMolecular function • metal ion binding • protein binding • calcium ion binding • protein C-terminus bindingCellular component • basement membrane • Golgi lumen • extracellular exosome • lysosomal lumen • extracellular region • plasma membrane • proteinaceous extracellular matrix • extracellular matrix • focal adhesion • extracellular spaceBiological process • glycosaminoglycan metabolic process
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Fibulin-1
NM_006487 NM_001996 NM_006485 NM_006486NM_010180 NM_001347088RefSeq (protein)NP_001987 NP_006476 NP_006477 NP_006478NP_001334017 NP_034310Location (UCSC) Chr 22: 45.5 – 45.6 Mb Chr 15: 85.21 – 85.29 MbPubMed search [3] [4]WikidataView/Edit Human View/Edit MouseFBLN1 is the gene encoding fibulin-1, an extracellular matrix and plasma protein.[5][6][7]Contents1 Function 2 Structure 3 Interactions 4 See also 5 References 6 Further readingFunction[edit] Fibulin-1 is a secreted glycoprotein that is found in association with extracellular matrix structures including fibronectin-containing fibers, elastin-containing fibers and basement membranes
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Slit (gene)
Slit is a family of secreted extracellular matrix proteins which play an important signalling role in the neural development of most bilaterians (animals with bilateral symmetry). While lower animal species, including insects and nematode worms, possess a single Slit gene, humans, mice and other vertebrates possess three Slit homologs: Slit1, Slit2 and Slit3. Human Slits have been shown to be involved certain pathological conditions, such as cancer and inflammation.[1] The ventral midline of the central nervous system is a key place where axons can either decide to cross and laterally project or stay on the same side of the brain.[2] The main function of Slit proteins is to act as midline repellents, preventing the crossing of longitudinal axons through the midline of the central nervous system of most bilaterian animal species, including mice, chickens, humans, insects, nematode worms and planarians.[3] It also prevents the recrossing of commissural axons
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Mucin
Mucins (/ˈmjuːsɪn/) are a family of high molecular weight, heavily glycosylated proteins (glycoconjugates) produced by epithelial tissues in most animals.[1] Mucins' key characteristic is their ability to form gels; therefore they are a key component in most gel-like secretions, serving functions from lubrication to cell signalling to forming chemical barriers.[1] They often take an inhibitory role.[1] Some mucins are associated with controlling mineralization, including nacre formation in mollusks,[2] calcification in echinoderms[3] and bone formation in vertebrates.[4] They bind to pathogens as part of the immune system
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Chondrodysplasia
Osteochondrodysplasia or skeletal dysplasia is a general term for a disorder of the development (dysplasia) of bone ("osteo") and cartilage ("chondro").[1] Osteochondrodysplasias are rare diseases. About 1 in 5,000 babies are born with some type of skeletal dysplasia.[2]Contents1 Types1.1 Achondroplasia 1.2 Pseudoachondroplasia 1.3 Osteogenesis Imperfecta 1.4 Muocopolysachariodosis 1.5 Cleidocranial dysostosis 1.6 Fibrous dysplasia 1.7 Langer-Giedion syndrome 1.8 Maffucci syndrome 1.9 Osteosclerosis 1.10 Other2 Diagnosis 3 Treatment 4 References 5 External linksTypes[edit] Achondroplasia[edit] Main article: Achondroplasia Achondroplasia is a type of autosomal dominant genetic disorder that is the most common cause of dwarfism
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Pancreatic Beta Cell
Beta cells (β cells) are a type of cell found in the pancreatic islets of the pancreas. They make up 65–80% of the cells in the islets.Contents1 Function1.1 Other hormones2 Clinical significance 3 Research3.1 Type 1 Diabetes4 See also 5 ReferencesFunction[edit] The primary function of a beta cell is to store and release insulin. Insulin is a hormone that brings about effects which reduce blood glucose concentration. Beta cells can respond quickly to spikes in blood glucose concentrations by secreting some of their stored insulin while simultaneously producing more. Voltage-gated calcium channels and ATP-sensitive potassium ion channels are embedded in the cell surface membrane of beta cells. These ATP-sensitive potassium ion channels are normally open and the calcium ion channels are normally closed
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Ovulation
Ovulation
Ovulation
is the release of eggs from the ovaries. In humans, this event occurs when the follicles rupture and release the secondary oocyte ovarian cells.[1] After ovulation, during the luteal phase, the egg will be available to be fertilized by sperm. In addition, the uterine lining (endometrium) is thickened to be able to receive a fertilized egg. If no conception occurs, the uterine lining as well as blood will be shed during menstruation.[2]Contents1 In humans1.1 Follicular phase 1.2 Ovulation 1.3 Luteal phase2 Clinical presentation 3 Disorders 4 Induction and suppression4.1 Induced ovulation 4.2 Suppressed ovulation5 See also 6 Notes 7 Further readingIn humans[edit] Ovulation
Ovulation
occurs about midway through the menstrual cycle, after the follicular phase, and is followed by the luteal phase
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Mendelian Inheritance In Man
Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) is a continuously updated catalog of human genes and genetic disorders and traits, with a particular focus on the gene-phenotype relationship. As of 12 February 2017[update], approximately 8,425 of the over 23,000 entries in OMIM represented phenotypes; the rest represented genes, many of which were related to known phenotypes.[1]Contents1 Versions and history 2 Collection process and use 3 MIM classification system3.1 MIM numbers 3.2 Symbols preceding MIM numbers4 See also 5 References 6 External linksVersions and history[edit] OMIM is the online continuation of Dr. Victor A. McKusick's Mendelian Inheritance in Man (MIM), which was published in 12 editions between 1966 and 1998.[2][3][4] Nearly all of the 1,486 entries in the first edition of MIM discussed phenotypes.[2] MIM/OMIM is produced and curated at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine (JHUSOM)
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Wound Healing
Wound healing
Wound healing
is an intricate process in which the skin repairs itself after injury.[1] In this article, wound healing is depicted in a discrete timeline of physical attributes (phases) constituting the post-trauma repairing process. In undamaged skin, the epidermis (surface layer) and dermis (deeper layer) form a protective barrier against the external environment. When the barrier is broken, a regulated sequence of biochemical events is set into motion to repair the damage.[1][2] This process is divided into predictable phases: blood clotting (hemostasis), inflammation, tissue growth (proliferation), and tissue remodeling (maturation)
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Fibrotic
Fibrosis is the formation of excess fibrous connective tissue in an organ or tissue in a reparative or reactive process.[1] This can be a reactive, benign, or pathological state. In response to injury, this is called scarring, and if fibrosis arises from a single cell line, this is called a fibroma. Physiologically, fibrosis acts to deposit connective tissue, which can obliterate the architecture and function of the underlying organ or tissue
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