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Conamara Theas
Conamara Theas is an Irish-speaking district in the West of County Galway. There are around 7,000 people living in the area (excluding the Aran islands). Between 80% and 90% of residents are native Irish speakers. It is also known as South Connemara
Connemara
and is the part of the Gaeltacht that is west of Cois Fharraige. It is a predominantly Irish-speaking area. It covers the area from Ros a Mhil, Casla, Ceathru Rua, Ceantar na nOilean, Camus, Rosmuc
Rosmuc
and The Iorras Aithneach peninsula
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Irish Language
The Irish language
Irish language
(Gaeilge), also referred to as the Gaelic or the Irish Gaelic language,[5] is a Goidelic
Goidelic
language (Gaelic) of the Indo-European language family originating in Ireland
Ireland
and historically spoken by the Irish people. Irish is spoken as a first language by a small minority of Irish people, and as a second language by a larger group of non-native speakers. Irish has been the predominant language of the Irish people
Irish people
for most of their recorded history, and they have brought it with them to other regions, notably Scotland
Scotland
and the Isle of Man, where Middle Irish gave rise to Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic
and Manx respectively
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National University Of Ireland, Galway
The National University of Ireland
National University of Ireland
Galway
Galway
(NUI Galway, Irish OÉ Gaillimh) is located in Ireland's most westerly city of Galway. A tertiary-level teaching and research institution, it is ranked among the top 1% of universities in the world.[2] The University is ranked #148 in the 2017 QS World University Rankings
QS World University Rankings
and has been also been awarded the full five QS stars for excellence.[3] The University was founded in 1845 as Queen's College, Galway, and was more recently known as University College, Galway
Galway
(UCG) (Irish: Coláiste na hOllscoile, Gaillimh or COG). Alumni include former Taoiseach
Taoiseach
Enda Kenny
Enda Kenny
and current President of Ireland
President of Ireland
Michael D. Higgins, as well as numerous other prominent politicians
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RTÉ Raidió Na Gaeltachta
Raidió Teilifís Éireann[2] (Irish pronunciation: [ˈradʲo ˈtʲɛlʲəfʲiːʃ ˈeːrʲən] ( listen); Radio
Radio
[and] Television
Television
of Ireland; abbreviated as RTÉ) is a semi-state company and the national public service broadcaster of the Republic of Ireland. It both produces programmes and broadcasts them on television, radio and the Internet. The radio service began on 1 January 1926,[3] while regular television broadcasts began on 31 December 1961,[4] making it one of the oldest continuously operating public service broadcasters in the world. RTÉ also publishes a weekly lifestyle magazine called the RTÉ Guide. RTÉ is financed by a television licence fee and through advertising. Some RTÉ services are only funded by advertising, while other RTÉ services are only funded by the licence fee. RTÉ is a statutory body, run by a board appointed by the Government of Ireland
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County Antrim
County Antrim
County Antrim
(named after the town of Antrim, from Irish: Aontroim, meaning "lone ridge", [ˈeːnˠt̪ˠɾˠɪmʲ])[5]) is one of six counties that form Northern Ireland. Adjoined to the north-east shore of Lough Neagh, the county covers an area of 3,046 square kilometres (1,176 sq mi)[6] and has a population of about 618,000. County Antrim
County Antrim
has a population density of 203 people per square kilometre or 526 people per square mile.[7] It is also one of the thirty-two traditional counties of Ireland, as well as part of the historic province of Ulster. The Glens of Antrim
Glens of Antrim
offer isolated rugged landscapes, the Giant's Causeway is a unique landscape and a UNESCO
UNESCO
World Heritage Site, Bushmills
Bushmills
produces whiskey, and Portrush
Portrush
is a popular seaside resort and night-life area
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County Meath
County Meath (/miːð/ MEEDH; Irish: Contae na Mí or simply an Mhí) is a county in Ireland. It is in the province of Leinster and is part of the Mid-East Region. It is named after the historic Kingdom of Meath (from Midhe meaning "middle" or "centre").[1] Meath County Council is the local authority for the county. According to the 2016 census, the population of the county is 195,044.[2] The county town of Meath is Navan (An Uaimh)
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County Waterford
County Waterford (Irish: Contae Phort Láirge; the English name comes from Old Norse Vedrafjörður) is a county in the South-East Region of Ireland, in the province of Munster. It is named after the city of Waterford, which is derived from the Old Norse name Veðrafjǫrðr or Vedrarfjord. There is an Irish-speaking area, Gaeltacht na nDéise, in the south-west of the county. Waterford City and County Council is the local authority for the county. The population of the county at large, including the city, is 113,795 according to the 2011 census[1].Contents1 Geography and political subdivisions1.1 Baronies 1.2 Towns and villages2 History 3 Local government and politics 4 Gaeltacht 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksGeography and political subdivisions[edit] County Waterford has two mountain ranges, the Knockmealdown Mountains and the Comeragh Mountains. The highest point in the county is Knockmealdown, at 794m
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County Cork
County Cork (Irish: Contae Chorcaí) is the largest and southernmost county of Ireland. It is situated in the province of Munster and named after the city of Cork (Irish: Corcaigh), Ireland's second largest city. Cork County Council is the local authority for the county. Its largest market towns are Mallow, Macroom, Midleton and Skibbereen. Cork City is governed by the City Council. In 2016, the county's population was 542,196, making it the third most populous county in Ireland.[1] Notable Corkonians include Michael Collins, Jack Lynch and Sonia O'Sullivan. Cork borders four other counties; Kerry to the west, Limerick to the north, Tipperary to the north-east and Waterford to the east. The county contains the Golden Vale pastureland and stretches from Kanturk in the north to Allihies in the south
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County Kerry
County Kerry
County Kerry
(Irish: Contae Chiarraí) is a county in Ireland. Kerry is located in the South-West Region and is also part of the province of Munster. It is named after the Ciarraige who lived in part of the present county. Kerry County Council
Kerry County Council
is the local authority for the county and Tralee
Tralee
serves as the county town. The population of the county was 147,554 in 2016, according to the 2016 census
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County Mayo
County Mayo (Irish: Contae Mhaigh Eo, meaning "Plain of the yew trees") is a county in Ireland. In the West of Ireland, it is part of the province of Connacht and is named after the village of Mayo, now generally known as Mayo Abbey. Mayo County Council is the local authority for the county. The population of the county was 130,638 at the 2011 census.[1] The boundaries of the county, which was formed in 1585, reflect the Mac William Íochtar lordship at that time.Contents1 Geography1.1 Local government and political subdivisions 1.2 Largest towns (2016 Census) 1.3 Towns and villages 1.4 Flora and fauna2 History2.1 Prehistory 2.2 Megalithic tombs 2.3 Bronze Age (ca. 2,500 BC to 500 BC) 2.4 Iron Age (ca. 500 BC to AD 325) 2.5 Early Christian period (ca
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County Donegal
County Donegal
Donegal
(pronounced /ˈdʌnɪɡɔːl/ or /ˌdʌnɪˈɡɔːl/; Irish: Contae Dhún na nGall) is a county of Ireland
Ireland
in the province of Ulster. It is named after the town of Donegal
Donegal
(Irish: Dún na nGall, meaning "fort of the foreigners"[5]) in the south of the county. Donegal County Council
Donegal County Council
is the local council and Lifford
Lifford
the county town. The population was 158,755 at the 2016 census
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Raidio Na Gaeltachta
NA, N.A., Na, or n/a may refer to:Contents1 Arts and media 2 Organizations 3 Language 4 Names 5 Places 6 Science and technology6.1 Biology and medicine 6.2 Chemistry 6.3 Other uses in science and technology7 Other uses 8 See alsoArts and media[edit]Na (drum), a drum played by Tibetan shamans National Academician, a member of the National Academy of Design New adult fiction, fiction marketed to people 18-30 years old Virgin New Adventures, a series of Doctor Who novels Nahal, Shine's pet Bengal tiger on the Nick Jr
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Camus, County Galway
Camus or Camas is a small village in the Connemara
Connemara
Gaeltacht
Gaeltacht
of County Galway, Ireland. It is between Casla
Casla
and An Teach Dóite, and is divided into Camas Uachtair and Camas Íochtair, as well as several other townlands, such as Scríob, Gleann Trasna, Leitir Móir, and Doire Bhainbh. It is notable for being the village with the highest percentage of Irish language
Irish language
speakers in the Gaeltacht.Contents1 Name 2 Notable buildings 3 Notable citizens 4 References 5 See alsoName[edit] The name Camus/Camas (both versions are used, though the version Camus, which has been in use for generations in both Irish and English has been retained by the great majority of the population). The name refers to the shape of the nearby bay in which the tides come and go through the narrow strait at Dun Manus and enter Camus bay at an angle
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Rossaveal
Rossaveal or Rossaveel[1] (Irish: Ros an Mhíl[1] or Ros a' Mhíl) is a Gaeltacht village in the Connemara area of County Galway, Ireland. It is the main ferry port for the Aran Islands in Galway Bay. It is about 23 kilometres (14 mi) from Galway city. The Irish name Ros an Mhíl means "peninsula of the whale or sea monster". The village is the home of the Ros a' Mhíl centre under Coláiste Chamuis, an Irish language immersion summer camp for teenagers
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Carraroe
Carraroe
Carraroe
(Irish: An Cheathrú Rua Irish pronunciation: [ənˠ ˌça(h).ɾˠuː ˈɾˠuˑə],[1] its official name)[2] is a village in County Galway, Republic of Ireland. The village is within the Irish-speaking region (Gaeltacht) of Connemara, and is famous for its traditional fishing boats known as Galway
Galway
Hookers. Its population is widely dispersed over Carraroe
Carraroe
peninsula between Greatman's Bay (Cuan an Fhir Mhóir) and Casla
Casla
Bay (Cuan Chasla)
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Muskerry
Muskerry is a central region of County Cork, Ireland which incorporates the baronies of Muskerry West
Muskerry West
and Muskerry East. It is located along the valley of the River Lee and is bounded by the Boggeragh Mountains
Boggeragh Mountains
to the north and the Shehy Mountains
Shehy Mountains
to the south. The region is named after the Múscraige, who were an important Érainn
Érainn
people of Munster. It is also the name of an official Gaeltacht
Gaeltacht
region in which Munster
Munster
Irish is spoken. Gaeltacht
Gaeltacht
villages include Béal Átha an Ghaorthaidh, Baile Bhuirne, Cúil Aodha
Cúil Aodha
and Cill na Martra
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