HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Compendium Of Chemical Terminology
The International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry
International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry
publishes many books, which contain its complete list of definitions. The definitions are divided into seven "colour books": Gold, Green, Blue, Purple, Orange, White, and Red.[1] There is also an eighth book—the "Silver Book".Contents1 The eight colour books1.1 Blue Book 1.2 Gold Book 1.3 Green Book 1.4 Orange Book 1.5 Purple Book 1.6 Red Book 1.7 Silver Book 1.8 White Book2 See also 3 References 4 External links4.1 Blue Book 4.2 Gold Book 4.3 Orange Book 4.4 Red Book 4.5 OthersThe eight colour books[edit] Blue Book[edit] Nomenclature of Organic Chemistry, commonly referred to by chemists as the Blue Book, is a collection of recommendations on organic chemical nomenclature published at irregular intervals by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC)
[...More...]

"Compendium Of Chemical Terminology" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Pergamon Press
Pergamon
Pergamon
Press was an Oxford-based publishing house, founded by Paul Rosbaud and Robert Maxwell, which published scientific and medical books and journals. Originally called Butterworth-Springer, it is now an imprint of Elsevier. History[edit] The core company, Butterworth-Springer, started in 1948 to bring the "Springer know-how and techniques of aggressive publishing in science"[1] to Britain. Paul Rosbaud was the man with the knowledge. When Maxwell acquired the company in 1951, Rosbaud held a one-quarter share.[1] They changed the house name to Pergamon
Pergamon
Press, using a logo that was a reproduction of a Greek coin from Pergamon
[...More...]

"Pergamon Press" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Out-of-print Book
An out-of-print book is a book that is no longer being published. The term can apply to specific editions of more popular works, which may then go in and out of print repeatedly, or to the sole printed edition of a work, which is not picked up again by any future publishers for reprint. Most works that have ever been published are out of print at any given time, while certain highly popular books, such as the Bible, are always "in print". Less popular out of print books are often rare and may be difficult to acquire unless scanned or electronic copies of the books are available. With the advent of book scanning, and print-on-demand technology, fewer and fewer works are now considered truly out of print. A publisher creates a print run of a fixed number of copies of a new book. Print runs for most modern books number in the thousands
[...More...]

"Out-of-print Book" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Pure And Applied Chemistry
Pure and Applied Chemistry
Chemistry
(abbreviated Pure Appl. Chem.) is the official journal for the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry
Chemistry
(IUPAC). It is published monthly by Walter de Gruyter
Walter de Gruyter
and contains recommendations and reports, and lectures from symposia. References[edit]This article about a chemistry journal is a stub. You can help by expanding it.v t eSee tips for writing articles about academic journals
[...More...]

"Pure And Applied Chemistry" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Chemistry
Chemistry
Chemistry
is the scientific discipline involved with compounds composed of atoms, i.e. elements, and molecules, i.e. combinations of atoms: their composition, structure, properties, behavior and the changes they undergo during a reaction with other compounds.[1][2] Chemistry
Chemistry
addresses topics such as how atoms and molecules interact via chemical bonds to form new chemical compounds. There are four types of chemical bonds: covalent bonds, in which compounds share one or more electron(s); ionic bonds, in which a compound donates one or more electrons to another compound to produce ions: cations and anions; hydrogen bonds; and Van der Waals force
Van der Waals force
bonds
[...More...]

"Chemistry" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Royal Society Of Chemistry
The Royal Society
Royal Society
of Chemistry
Chemistry
(RSC) is a learned society (professional association) in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
with the goal of "advancing the chemical sciences". It was formed in 1980 from the amalgamation of the Chemical Society, the Royal Institute of Chemistry, the Faraday Society, and the Society for Analytical Chemistry
Chemistry
with a new Royal Charter and the dual role of learned society and professional body. At its inception, the Society had a combined membership of 34,000 in the UK and a further 8,000 abroad.[2] The headquarters of the Society are at Burlington House, Piccadilly, London. It also has offices in Thomas Graham House in Cambridge
Cambridge
(named after Thomas Graham, the first president of the Chemical Society) where RSC Publishing is based
[...More...]

"Royal Society Of Chemistry" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
[...More...]

"International Standard Book Number" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garb
[...More...]

"Special" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Blackwell Science
Wiley-Blackwell is the international scientific, technical, medical, and scholarly publishing business of John Wiley & Sons. It was formed by the merger of John Wiley's Global Scientific, Technical, and Medical business with Blackwell Publishing, after Wiley took over the latter in 2007.[1] As a learned society publisher, Wiley-Blackwell partners with around 750 societies and associations. The company publishes nearly 1,500 peer-reviewed journals and more than 1,500 new books annually in print and online, as well as databases, major reference works, and laboratory protocols
[...More...]

"Blackwell Science" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Analytical Chemistry
Analytical chemistry
Analytical chemistry
studies and uses instruments and methods used to separate, identify, and quantify matter.[1] In practice separation, identification or quantification may constitute the entire analysis or be combined with another method. Separation isolates analytes. Qualitative analysis identifies analytes, while quantitative analysis determines the numerical amount or concentration. Analytical chemistry
Analytical chemistry
consists of classical, wet chemical methods and modern, instrumental methods.[2] Classical qualitative methods use separations such as precipitation, extraction, and distillation. Identification may be based on differences in color, odor, melting point, boiling point, radioactivity or reactivity. Classical quantitative analysis uses mass or volume changes to quantify amount. Instrumental methods may be used to separate samples using chromatography, electrophoresis or field flow fractionation
[...More...]

"Analytical Chemistry" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

IUPAC Nomenclature Of Organic Chemistry
In chemical nomenclature, the IUPAC nomenclature of organic chemistry is a systematic method of naming organic chemical compounds as recommended[1] by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC). It is published in the Nomenclature of Organic Chemistry (informally called the Blue Book). Ideally, every possible organic compound should have a name from which an unambiguous structural formula can be created. There is also an IUPAC nomenclature of inorganic chemistry. To avoid long and tedious names in normal communication, the official IUPAC naming recommendations are not always followed in practice, except when it is necessary to give an unambiguous and absolute definition to a compound. IUPAC names can sometimes be simpler than older names, as with ethanol, instead of ethyl alcohol. For relatively simple molecules they can be more easily understood than non-systematic names, which must be learnt or looked up
[...More...]

"IUPAC Nomenclature Of Organic Chemistry" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

International Union Of Pure And Applied Chemistry Nomenclature
The International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry
International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry
(IUPAC) has published four sets of rules to standardize chemical nomenclature. There are two main areas: IUPAC nomenclature of inorganic chemistry
IUPAC nomenclature of inorganic chemistry
(Red Book) IUPAC nomenclature of organic chemistry
IUPAC nomenclature of organic chemistry
(Blue Book)This chemistry-related article is a stub
[...More...]

"International Union Of Pure And Applied Chemistry Nomenclature" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

IUPAC Polymer Nomenclature
IUPAC Polymer
Polymer
Nomenclature are standardized naming conventions for polymers set by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) and described in their publication "Compendium of Polymer Terminology and Nomenclature", which is also known as the "Purple Book".[1][2] Both the IUPAC[3] and Chemical Abstracts Service
Chemical Abstracts Service
(CAS) make similar naming recommendations for the naming of polymers.Contents1 Basic Concepts 2 Source-Based Nomenclature2.1 Homopolymers 2.2 Copolymers 2.3 Non-linear polymers3 Structure-Based Nomenclature3.1 Regular single-strand organic polymers 3.2 Regular double-strand organic polymers4 Nomenclature of Inorganic and Inorganic-Organic Polymers 5 Traditional Names 6 Graphical Representations 7 CA Index Names 8 See also 9 References 10 External linksBasic Concepts[edit] The terms polymer and macromolecule do not mean the same thing
[...More...]

"IUPAC Polymer Nomenclature" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Nomenclature Of Organic Chemistry
Nomenclature is a system of names or terms, or the rules for forming these terms in a particular field of arts or sciences. Nomenclature is the system of assignment of names given to organic compounds.[1] The principles of naming vary from the relatively informal conventions of everyday speech to the internationally agreed principles, rules and recommendations that govern the formation and use of the specialist terms used in scientific and any other disciplines.[2] Naming "things" is a part of general human communication using words and language: it is an aspect of everyday taxonomy as people distinguish the objects of their experience, together with their similarities and differences, which observers identify, name and classify
[...More...]

"Nomenclature Of Organic Chemistry" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Compendium Of Analytical Nomenclature
Nomenclature is a system of names or terms, or the rules for forming these terms in a particular field of arts or sciences. Nomenclature is the system of assignment of names given to organic compounds.[1] The principles of naming vary from the relatively informal conventions of everyday speech to the internationally agreed principles, rules and recommendations that govern the formation and use of the specialist terms used in scientific and any other disciplines.[2] Naming "things" is a part of general human communication using words and language: it is an aspect of everyday taxonomy as people distinguish the objects of their experience, together with their similarities and differences, which observers identify, name and classify
[...More...]

"Compendium Of Analytical Nomenclature" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

IUPAC Books
The International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry
International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry
publishes many books, which contain its complete list of definitions. The definitions are divided into seven "colour books": Gold, Green, Blue, Purple, Orange, White, and Red.[1] There is also an eighth book—the "Silver Book".Contents1 The eight colour books1.1 Blue Book 1.2 Gold Book 1.3 Green Book 1.4 Orange Book 1.5 Purple Book 1.6 Red Book 1.7 Silver Book 1.8 White Book2 See also 3 References 4 External links4.1 Blue Book 4.2 Gold Book 4.3 Orange Book 4.4 Red Book 4.5 OthersThe eight colour books[edit] Blue Book[edit] Nomenclature of Organic Chemistry, commonly referred to by chemists as the Blue Book, is a collection of recommendations on organic chemical nomenclature published at irregular intervals by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC)
[...More...]

"IUPAC Books" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.