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Community
A community is a small or large social unit (a group of living things) who have something in common, such as norms, religion, values, or identity. Communities often share a sense of place that is situated in a given geographical area (e.g. a country, village, town, or neighborhood) or in virtual space through communication platforms. Durable relations that extend beyond immediate genealogical ties also define a sense of community
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Intention
Intention is a mental state that represents a commitment to carrying out an action or actions in the future
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Social Philosophy
Social philosophy is the study of questions about social behavior and interpretations of society and social institutions in terms of ethical values rather than empirical relations.[1] Social philosophers place new emphasis on understanding the social contexts for political, legal, moral, and cultural questions, and to the development of novel theoretical frameworks, from social ontology to care ethics to cosmopolitan theories of democracy, human rights, gender equity and global justice.[2]Contents1 Subdisciplines 2 Relevant issues 3 Social philosophers 4 See also 5 ReferencesSubdisciplines[edit] There is often a considerable overlap between the questions addressed by social philosophy and ethics or value theory
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Human
Homo
Homo
sapiens idaltu White et al., 2003 Homo
Homo
sapiens sapiens Homo
Homo
sapiens population densitySynonyms Species
Species
synonymy[1]aethiopicus Bory de St. Vincent, 1825 americanus Bory de St. Vincent, 1825 arabicus Bory de St. Vincent, 1825 aurignacensis Klaatsch & Hauser, 1910 australasicus Bory de St. Vincent, 1825 cafer Bory de St. Vincent, 1825 capensis Broom, 1917 columbicus Bory de St. Vincent, 1825 cro-magnonensis Gregory, 1921 drennani Kleinschmidt, 1931 eurafricanus (Sergi, 1911) grimaldiensis Gregory, 1921 grimaldii Lapouge, 1906 hottentotus Bory de St. Vincent, 1825 hyperboreus Bory de St. Vincent, 1825 indicus Bory de St. Vincent, 1825 japeticus Bory de St. Vincent, 1825 melaninus Bory de St. Vincent, 1825 monstrosus Linnaeus, 1758 neptunianus Bory de St. Vincent, 1825 palestinus McCown & Keith, 1932 patagonus Bory de St
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Latin
Latin
Latin
(Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: [ˈlɪŋɡʷa laˈtiːna]) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets, and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in Latium, in the Italian Peninsula.[3] Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became the dominant language, initially in Italy and subsequently throughout the Roman Empire. Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
developed into the Romance languages, such as Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, French, and Romanian. Latin, Greek and French have contributed many words to the English language
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Old French
Old French
Old French
(franceis, françois, romanz; Modern French: ancien français) was the language spoken in Northern France
France
from the 8th century to the 14th century. In the 14th century, these dialects came to be collectively known as the langue d'oïl, contrasting with the langue d'oc or Occitan language
Occitan language
in the south of France
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Place (geography)
The terms location and place in geography are used to identify a point or an area on the Earth's surface or elsewhere. The term location generally implies a higher degree of certainty than place, the latter often indicating an entity with an ambiguous boundary, relying more on human or social attributes of place identity and sense of place than on geometry.[1]Contents1 Types of location and place1.1 Relative location 1.2 Locality 1.3 Absolute location2 See also 3 ReferencesTypes of location and place[edit] Relative location[edit] A relative location, or situation, is described as a displacement from another site. An example is "3 miles northwest of Seattle". Locality[edit] A location, settlement, or populated place is likely to have a well-defined name but a boundary which is not well defined in varies by context. London, for instance, has a legal boundary, but this is unlikely to completely match with general usage
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Values
In ethics, value denotes the degree of importance of some thing or action, with the aim of determining what actions are best to do or what way is best to live (normative ethics), or to describe the significance of different actions. It may be described as treating actions as abstract objects, putting value to them. It deals with right conduct and living a good life, in the sense that a highly, or at least relatively high valuable action may be regarded as ethically "good" (adjective sense), and that an action of low value, or relatively low in value, may be regarded as "bad".[citation needed] What makes an action valuable may in turn depend on the ethic values of the objects it increases, decreases or alters. An object with "ethic value" may be termed an "ethic or philosophic good" (noun sense). Values can be defined as broad preferences concerning appropriate courses of actions or outcomes. As such, values reflect a person's sense of right and wrong or what "ought" to be
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Socialization
In sociology, socialization is the process of internalizing the norms and ideologies of society. Socialization
Socialization
encompasses both learning and teaching and is thus "the means by which social and cultural continuity are attained".[1]:5[2] Socialization
Socialization
is strongly connected to developmental psychology.[3] Humans need social experiences to learn their culture and to survive.[4] Socialization
Socialization
essentially represents the whole process of learning throughout the life course and is a central influence on the behavior, beliefs, and actions of adults as well as of children.[5][6] Socialization
Socialization
may lead to desirable outcomes—sometimes labeled "moral"—as regards the society where it occurs. Individual views are influenced by the society's consensus and usually tend toward what that society finds acceptable or "normal"
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Small-group Communication
Communication in small groups is interpersonal communication within groups.[1] Groups generally work in a context that is both relational and social.[2] Quality communication such as helping behaviors and information-sharing causes groups to be superior to the average individual in terms of the quality of decisions and effectiveness of decisions made or actions taken.[3] However, quality decision-making requires that members both identify with the group and have an attitude of commitment to participation in interaction.[4]Contents1 Group communication1.1 Linear phase model 1.2 Idea development2 Social influence in groups2.1 Conflict resolution 2.2 Group de
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Sociocultural Evolution
Sociocultural evolution, sociocultural evolutionism or cultural evolution are theories of cultural and social evolution that describe how cultures and societies change over time. Whereas sociocultural development traces processes that tend to increase the complexity of a society or culture, sociocultural evolution also considers process that can lead to decreases in complexity (degeneration) or that can produce variation or proliferation without any seemingly significant changes in complexity (cladogenesis).[1] Sociocultural evolution
Sociocultural evolution
is "the process by which structural reorganization is affected through time, eventually producing a form or structure which is qualitatively different from the ancestral form".[2] Most 19th-century and some 20th-century approaches to socioculture aimed to provide models for the evolution of humankind as a whole, arguing that different societies have reached different stages of social development
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Organization
An organization or organisation is an entity comprising multiple people, such as an institution or an association, that has a collective goal and is linked to an external environment.[1][citation needed] The word is derived from the Greek word organon, which means "organ".Contents1 Types 2 Structures2.1 Committees or juries 2.2 Ecologies 2.3 Matrix organization 2.4 Pyramids or hierarchical3 Theories 4 Leadership4.1 Formal organizations 4.2 Informal organizations5 See also 6 References 7 External linksTypes[edit] There are a variety of legal types of organizations, including corporations, governments, non-governmental organizations, political organizations, international organizations, armed forces, charities, not-for-profit corporations, partnerships, cooperatives, and educational institutions. A hybrid organization is a body that operates in both the public sector and the private sector simultaneously, fulfilling public duties and devel
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Social Geography
Social geography
Social geography
is the branch of human geography that is most closely related to social theory in general and sociology in particular, dealing with the relation of social phenomena and its spatial components
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Stonehenge
Stonehenge
Stonehenge
is a prehistoric monument in Wiltshire, England, 2 miles (3 km) west of Amesbury. It consists of a ring of standing stones, with each standing stone around 13 feet (4.0 m) high, 7 feet (2.1 m) wide and weighing around 25 tons. The stones are set within earthworks in the middle of the most dense complex of Neolithic and Bronze Age
Bronze Age
monuments in England, including several hundred burial mounds.[1] Archaeologists
Archaeologists
believe it was constructed from 3000 BC to 2000 BC
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Internet Studies
Internet
Internet
studies is an interdisciplinary field studying the social, psychological, pedagogical, political, technical, cultural, artistic, and other dimensions of the Internet
Internet
and associated information and communication technologies. While studies of the Internet
Internet
are now widespread across academic disciplines, there is a growing collaboration among these investigations. In recent years, Internet studies have become institutionalized as courses of study at several institutions of higher learning
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Computational Sociology
Computational sociology
Computational sociology
is a branch of sociology that uses computationally intensive methods to analyze and model social phenomena
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