HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Commonwealth Range
4,000 m (13,123 ft)  84° 41' S; 171° 55' E COORDINATES 84°41′S 171°55′E / 84.683°S 171.917°E / -84.683; 171.917   DIMENSIONS LENGTH 144 km (89 mi) N-S  WIDTH 66 km (41 mi) E-W  AREA 4,820 km2 (1,860 sq mi)  GEOGRAPHY CONTINENT Antarctica RANGE COORDINATES 84°15′S 172°13′E / 84.250°S 172.217°E / -84.250; 172.217 Coordinates : 84°15′S 172°13′E / 84.250°S 172.217°E / -84.250; 172.217 Commonwealth Range
Commonwealth Range
Commonwealth Range
Commonwealth Range
in Antarctica
Antarctica
The COMMONWEALTH RANGE is a north-south trending range of rugged mountains, 144 kilometres (89 mi) long, located within the Queen Maud Mountains on the Dufek Coast of the continent of Antarctica
Antarctica

[...More...]

"Commonwealth Range" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Australia
Coordinates : 25°S 133°E / 25°S 133°E / -25; 133 Commonwealth of Australia Flag Coat of arms ANTHEM: " Advance Australia Fair
Advance Australia Fair
" CAPITAL Canberra
Canberra
35°18′29″S 149°07′28″E
[...More...]

"Australia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

British Antarctic Expedition, 1907–09
The BRITISH ANTARCTIC EXPEDITION 1907–09, otherwise known as the NIMROD EXPEDITION, was the first of three expeditions to the Antarctic led by Ernest Shackleton . Its main target, among a range of geographical and scientific objectives, was to be first to the South Pole . This was not attained, but the expedition's southern march reached a Farthest South latitude of 88° 23' S, just 97.5 nautical miles (180.6 km; 112.2 mi) from the pole. This was by far the longest southern polar journey to that date and a record convergence on either Pole. A separate group led by Welsh Australian geology professor Edgeworth David reached the estimated location of the South Magnetic Pole , and the expedition also achieved the first ascent of Mount Erebus , Antarctica's second highest volcano. The expedition lacked governmental or institutional support, and relied on private loans and individual contributions. It was beset by financial problems and its preparations were hurried
[...More...]

"British Antarctic Expedition, 1907–09" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Dolphin Spur
DOLPHINS are a widely distributed and diverse group of aquatic mammals . They are an informal grouping within the order Cetacea , excluding whales and porpoises , so to zoologists the grouping is paraphyletic . The dolphins comprise the extant families Delphinidae (the oceanic dolphins), Platanistidae (the Indian river dolphins ), Iniidae (the new world river dolphins), and Pontoporiidae (the brackish dolphins), and the extinct Lipotidae (baiji or Chinese river dolphin). There are 40 extant species of dolphins. Dolphins, alongside other cetaceans , belong to the clade Cetartiodactyla with even-toed ungulates . Cetaceans' closest living relatives are the hippopotamuses , having diverged about 40 million years ago. Dolphins range in size from the 1.7 m (5.6 ft) long and 50 kg (110 lb) Maui\'s dolphin to the 9.5 m (31 ft) and 10 t (11 short tons) killer whale . Several species exhibit sexual dimorphism , in that the males are larger than females
[...More...]

"Dolphin Spur" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Summit
A SUMMIT is a point on a surface that is higher in elevation than all points immediately adjacent to it. Mathematically , a summit is a local maximum in elevation. The topographic terms "acme", "apex", "peak" , and "zenith " are synonymous . CONTENTS* 1 Definition * 1.1 Western United States * 2 See also * 3 References * 4 External links DEFINITIONThe term "top" is generally used only for a mountain peck with some significant amount of topographic prominence (height above the lowest point end route to the nearest higher peak) or topographic isolation (distance from the nearest point of higher elevation); for example, a big massive rock next to the main summit of a mountain is not considered a summit. Summits near a higher peak, with some prominence or isolation, but not reaching a certain cutoff value for the quantities, are often considered subsummits (or subpeaks) of the higher peak, and are considered as part of the same mountain
[...More...]

"Summit" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Mount Kaplan
MOUNT KAPLAN is a massive mountain , the highest in the Hughes Range of Antarctica , standing 5 km (3 mi) southeast of Mount Wexler . The mountain was discovered and photographed by Admiral Byrd on the Baselaying Flight of November 18, 1929, and surveyed by A.P. Crary in 1957–58. Crary named it for Joseph Kaplan, the chairman of the U.S. National Committee for the IGY , 1957–58. REFERENCES * ^ A B Mt. Kaplan on Peakbagger * ^ A B C U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Mount Kaplan This Dufek Coast location article is a stub . You can help by expanding it
[...More...]

"Mount Kaplan" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Mount Deakin
MOUNT DEAKIN (84°40′S 170°40′E / 84.667°S 170.667°E / -84.667; 170.667 Coordinates : 84°40′S 170°40′E / 84.667°S 170.667°E / -84.667; 170.667 ) is a prominent mountain in Antarctica , rising to 2,810 metres (9,220 ft), at the east side of Beardmore Glacier , just north of the mouth of Osicki Glacier . It was discovered by the British Antarctic Expedition, 1907–09 , and named by Ernest Shackleton for Sir Alfred Deakin , Prime Minister of Australia , who had supported the expedition. REFERENCES * This article incorporates public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Deakin, Mount" (content from the Geographic Names Information System ). This Dufek Coast location article is a stub . You can help by expanding it
[...More...]

"Mount Deakin" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Mount Hermanson
MOUNT HERMANSON (84°23′S 173°32′E / 84.383°S 173.533°E / -84.383; 173.533 Coordinates : 84°23′S 173°32′E / 84.383°S 173.533°E / -84.383; 173.533 ) is an ice-covered mountain in the Queen Maud Mountains of Antarctica, 3,140 metres (10,300 ft) high, standing at the head of Cunningham Glacier , 4 nautical miles (7 km) southwest of Gray Peak . It was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Captain J.M. Hermanson , U.S. Navy , an air operations officer at McMurdo Station , 1957–58, and Chief of Staff to the U.S. Antarctic Projects Officer, 1959. REFERENCES * ^ "Hermanson, Mount". Geographic Names Information System . United States Geological Survey . Retrieved 2012-06-14. This article incorporates public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Hermanson, Mount" (content from the Geographic Names Information System ). This Dufek Coast location article is a stub . You can help by expanding it
[...More...]

"Mount Hermanson" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ross Ice Shelf
The ROSS ICE SHELF is the largest ice shelf of Antarctica
Antarctica
(an area of roughly 487,000 square kilometres (188,000 sq mi) and about 800 kilometres (500 mi) across: about the size of France). It is several hundred metres thick. The nearly vertical ice front to the open sea is more than 600 kilometres (370 mi) long, and between 15 and 50 metres (50 and 160 ft) high above the water surface. Ninety percent of the floating ice, however, is below the water surface. Most of Ross Ice Shelf
Ross Ice Shelf
is in the Ross Dependency claimed by New Zealand. It floats in, and covers, a large southern portion of the Ross Sea
Ross Sea
and the entire Roosevelt Island located in the west of the Ross Sea. The ice shelf is named after Captain Sir James Clark Ross
James Clark Ross
, who discovered it on 28 January 1841
[...More...]

"Ross Ice Shelf" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Wayback Machine
The WAYBACK MACHINE is a digital archive of the World Wide Web
World Wide Web
and other information on the Internet
Internet
created by the Internet Archive
Internet Archive
, a nonprofit organization , based in San Francisco
San Francisco
, California
California
, United States . CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 Technical details * 2.1 Storage capabilities * 2.2 Growth * 2.3 Website exclusion policy * 2.3.1 Oakland Archive
Archive
Policy * 3 Uses * 3.1 In legal evidence * 3.1.1 Civil litigation * 3.1.1.1 Netbula LLC v. Chordiant Software Inc. * 3.1.1.2 Telewizja Polska
Telewizja Polska
* 3.1.2 Patent law * 3.1.3 Limitations of utility * 4 Legal status * 5 Archived content legal issues * 5.1 Scientology
Scientology
* 5.2 Healthcare Advocates, Inc
[...More...]

"Wayback Machine" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Mountain Range
A MOUNTAIN RANGE or HILL RANGE is a series of mountains or hills ranged in a line and connected by high ground. A MOUNTAIN SYSTEM or MOUNTAIN BELT is a group of mountain ranges with similarity in form, structure and alignment that have arisen from the same cause, usually an orogeny . Mountain
Mountain
ranges are formed by a variety of geological processes, but most of the significant ones on Earth
Earth
are the result of plate tectonics . Mountain
Mountain
ranges are also found on many planetary mass objects in the Solar System
Solar System
and are likely a feature of most terrestrial planets . Mountain
Mountain
ranges are usually segmented by highlands or mountain passes and valleys . Individual mountains within the same mountain range do not necessarily have the same geologic structure or petrology
[...More...]

"Mountain Range" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Geographic Coordinate System
A GEOGRAPHIC COORDINATE SYSTEM is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position , and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position . A common choice of coordinates is latitude , longitude and elevation . To specify a location on a two-dimensional map requires a map projection
[...More...]

"Geographic Coordinate System" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Special
SPECIAL or SPECIALS may refer to: CONTENTS * 1 Music * 2 Film and television * 3 Other uses * 4 See also MUSIC * Special (album) , a 1992 album by Vesta Williams * "Special" (Garbage song) , 1998 * "Special" (Mew song) , 2005 * "Special" (Stephen Lynch song) , 2000 * The Specials
The Specials
, a British band * "Special", a song by Violent Femmes on The Blind Leading the Naked * "Special", a song on
[...More...]

"Special" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Dufek Coast
The DUFEK COAST is that portion of the coast along the southwest margin of the Ross Ice Shelf between Airdrop Peak on the east side of the Beardmore Glacier and Morris Peak on the east side of Liv Glacier . It was named by the New Zealand Antarctic Place-Names Committee in 1961 after Rear Admiral George J. Dufek , United States Navy , who served under Rear Admiral Richard E. Byrd with the United States Antarctic Service , 1939–41, and as commander of the Eastern Task Force of U.S. Navy Operation Highjump , 1946–47. He was Commander of U.S. Naval Support Force Antarctica, 1954–59, a period in which the following American science stations were established: McMurdo Station , Little America V , Byrd Station , South Pole Station , Wilkes Station , Hallett Station and Ellsworth Station
[...More...]

"Dufek Coast" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Antarctica
ANTARCTICA (UK English /ænˈtɑːktɪkə/ or /ænˈtɑːtɪkə/ , US English /æntˈɑːrktɪkə/ ( listen )) is Earth
Earth
's southernmost continent . It contains the geographic South Pole
South Pole
and is situated in the Antarctic
Antarctic
region of the Southern Hemisphere
Southern Hemisphere
, almost entirely south of the Antarctic
Antarctic
Circle , and is surrounded by the Southern Ocean . At 14,000,000 square kilometres (5,400,000 square miles), it is the fifth-largest continent. For comparison, Antarctica
Antarctica
is nearly twice the size of Australia
Australia
. About 98% of Antarctica
Antarctica
is covered by ice that averages 1.9 km (1.2 mi; 6,200 ft) in thickness, which extends to all but the northernmost reaches of the Antarctic
Antarctic
Peninsula
[...More...]

"Antarctica" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Continent
A CONTINENT is one of several very large landmasses of the world . Generally identified by convention rather than any strict criteria, up to seven regions are commonly regarded as continents. Ordered from largest in size to smallest, they are: Asia
Asia
, Africa
Africa
, North America , South America
South America
, Antarctica
Antarctica
, Europe
Europe
, and Australia
Australia
. Geologically the continents largely correspond to areas of continental crust that are found on the continental plates . However, some areas of continental crust are regions covered with water not usually included in the list of continents. The area referred to as Zealandia
Zealandia
is one such area (see submerged continents below)
[...More...]

"Continent" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.