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Common Minke Whale
The common minke whale or northern minke whale (Balaenoptera acutorostrata) is a species of minke whale within the suborder of baleen whales. It is the smallest member of the rorquals and the second smallest species of baleen whale. Although first ignored by whalers due to its small size and low oil yield, it began to be exploited by various countries beginning in the early 20th century. As other species declined larger numbers of common minke whales were caught, largely for their meat. It is now one of the primary targets of the whaling industry
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Pliocene
The Pliocene
Pliocene
( /ˈplaɪəˌsiːn/;[2][3] also Pleiocene[4]) Epoch is the epoch in the geologic timescale that extends from 5.333 million to 2.58[5] million years BP. It is the second and youngest epoch of the Neogene
Neogene
Period in the Cenozoic
Cenozoic
Era. The Pliocene
Pliocene
follows the Miocene Epoch and is followed by the Pleistocene
Pleistocene
Epoch. Prior to the 2009 revision of the geologic time scale, which placed the four most recent major glaciations entirely within the Pleistocene, the Pliocene
Pliocene
also included the Gelasian stage, which lasted from 2.588 to 1.806 million years ago, and is now included in the Pleistocene.[6] As with other older geologic periods, the geological strata that define the start and end are well identified but the exact dates of the start and end of the epoch are slightly uncertain
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Richard Ellis (biologist)
Richard Ellis (born April 2, 1938) is an American marine biologist, author, and illustrator. He is a research associate in the American Museum of Natural History's division of paleontology,[1] special adviser to the American Cetacean Society, and a member of the Explorers Club. He was U.S. delegate to International Whaling Commission from 1980 to 1990.[citation needed] His paintings have been exhibited in galleries and museums around the world, and his murals can be seen in the Denver Museum of Natural History, the New Bedford Whaling Museum
New Bedford Whaling Museum
in Massachusetts,[2] and Whaleworld, a museum in Albany, Western Australia. He is the author of more than 100 magazine articles, which have appeared in National Geographic, Natural History, Audubon, Curator, National Wildlife, Geo, Australian Geographic, and Reader's Digest
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Synonym (taxonomy)
In scientific nomenclature, a synonym is a scientific name that applies to a taxon that (now) goes by a different scientific name,[1] although the term is used somewhat differently in the zoological code of nomenclature.[2] For example, Linnaeus was the first to give a scientific name (under the currently used system of scientific nomenclature) to the Norway spruce, which he called Pinus abies. This name is no longer in use: it is now a synonym of the current scientific name which is Picea abies. Unlike synonyms in other contexts, in taxonomy a synonym is not interchangeable with the name of which it is a synonym. In taxonomy, synonyms are not equals, but have a different status. For any taxon with a particular circumscription, position, and rank, only one scientific name is considered to be the correct one at any given time (this correct name is to be determined by applying the relevant code of nomenclature)
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Otto Fabricius
Otto Fabricius
Otto Fabricius
(6 March 1744 – 20 May 1822) was a Danish missionary, naturalist, ethnographer and explorer of Greenland. [1][2]Contents1 Biography 2 Fauna Groenlandica 3 References 4 Other sourcesBiography[edit] Otto Fabricius
Otto Fabricius
was born in Rudkøbing
Rudkøbing
on the island of Langeland, Denmark
Denmark
where his father was a rector. In his youth, he was largely educated at home by tutors. In 1762, he was matriculated at the University of Copenhagen. In 1765, he was admitted to the Greenland Mission Seminary (Seminarium Groenlandicum) where he attended classes taught by Poul Egede. In 1768 he graduated with a degree in divinity.[3] He was sent as a missionary to the southwestern coast of Greenland from 1768–1773. During this period, he made enormous amounts of observations and collections
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Frédéric Cuvier
Georges- Frédéric Cuvier (28 June 1773, Montbéliard, Doubs
Doubs
– 24 July 1838, Strasbourg) was a French zoologist and paleontologist. He was the younger brother of noted naturalist and zoologist Georges Cuvier. Frederic was the head keeper of the menagerie at the Muséum d'Histoire Naturelle in Paris
Paris
from 1804 to 1838. He named the red panda (Ailurus fulgens) in 1825. The chair of comparative physiology was created for him at the Muséum d'Histoire Naturelle
Muséum d'Histoire Naturelle
in 1837. He was elected as a foreign member of the Royal Society
Royal Society
in 1835. He is mentioned in Charles Darwin's On the Origin of Species
On the Origin of Species
(Chapter VII) as having worked on animal behaviour and instinct, especially the distinction between habit and instinct
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Edward Drinker Cope
Edward Drinker Cope
Edward Drinker Cope
(July 28, 1840 – April 12, 1897) was an American paleontologist and comparative anatomist, as well as a noted herpetologist and ichthyologist. He was a founder of the Neo-Lamarckism
Neo-Lamarckism
school of thought. Born to a wealthy Quaker family, Cope distinguished himself as a child prodigy interested in science; he published his first scientific paper at the age of 19. Though his father tried to raise Cope as a gentleman farmer, he eventually acquiesced to his son's scientific aspirations. Cope married his cousin and had one child; the family moved from Philadelphia
Philadelphia
to Haddonfield, New Jersey, although Cope would maintain a residence and museum in Philadelphia
Philadelphia
in his later years. Cope had little formal scientific training, and he eschewed a teaching position for field work
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Quaternary
Quaternary
Quaternary
( /kwəˈtɜːrnəri/) is the current and most recent of the three periods of the Cenozoic
Cenozoic

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Henrik Johan Bull
Henrik Johan Bull
Henrik Johan Bull
(13 October 1844 – 1 June 1930 ) was a Norwegian businessman and whaler. Henry Bull was one of the pioneers in the exploration of Antarctica.[1]The Cruise of the 'Antarctic' (London & New York: Edward Arnold, 1896)Biography[edit] Henrik Johan Bull
Henrik Johan Bull
was born at Stokke
Stokke
in Vestfold
Vestfold
County, Norway. He attended school in Tønsberg
Tønsberg
and worked for several years as a businessman in Tønsberg. During the late 1880s, he traveled to Melbourne, Australia, where he was associated with a company in shipping and trade.[2] In 1893, Norwegian whaling and shipping magnate Svend Foyn
Svend Foyn
agreed to financially support an Antarctica
Antarctica
expedition led by Henrik Bull in search of the elusive Right whale
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John Guille Millais
John Guille "Johnny" Millais (/ˈmɪleɪ/; 24 March 1865 – 24 March 1931) was a British artist,[1] naturalist, gardener and travel writer who specialised in wildlife and flower portraiture. He travelled extensively around the world in the late Victorian period detailing wildlife often for the first time. He is noted for illustrations that are of a particularly exact nature.Contents1 Early life 2 Working life 3 Artistic career 4 Family life in Sussex 5 Bibliography (United Kingdom) 6 References 7 External linksEarly life[edit] John Guille Millais was the fourth son and seventh child of Sir John Everett Millais, the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood painter, and his wife Effie Gray. John was raised in London and Perthshire with a wide interest in natural history, which embraced horticulture, hunting including big game hunting and wildfowl. As a boy he made a collection of birds shot around the Perthshire coast of Scotland where he spent much of his childhood
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Marine Biologist
Marine biology
Marine biology
is the scientific study of marine life, organisms in the sea. Given that in biology many phyla, families and genera have some species that live in the sea and others that live on land, marine biology classifies species based on the environment rather than on taxonomy. A large proportion of all life on Earth lives in the ocean. The exact size of this large proportion is unknown, since many ocean species are still to be discovered. The ocean is a complex three-dimensional world[3] covering approximately 71% of the Earth's surface. The habitats studied in marine biology include everything from the tiny layers of surface water in which organisms and abiotic items may be trapped in surface tension between the ocean and atmosphere, to the depths of the oceanic trenches, sometimes 10,000 meters or more beneath the surface of the ocean
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Svend Foyn
Svend Foyn
Svend Foyn
(July 9, 1809 – November 30, 1894) was a Norwegian whaling, shipping magnate and philanthropist. He pioneered revolutionary methods for hunting and processing whales. Svend Foyn introduced the modern harpoon cannon and brought whaling into a modern age.[1][2]Contents1 Background 2 Career 3 Philanthropy 4 Personal life 5 Memorials 6 Legacy 7 References 8 Additional sources 9 External linksBackground[edit] Svend Foyn
Svend Foyn
was born in the neighborhood of Foynegården at Tønsberg in Vestfold, Norway. He was the son of shipmaster Laurentius Foyn (1772–1813) and Benthe Marie Ager (1781–1842). Foyn was fatherless at four years of age and his mother came to characterize his upbringing. By age 11, Foyn sent to sea on the family ships
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Precambrian
The Precambrian
Precambrian
(or Pre-Cambrian, sometimes abbreviated pЄ, or Cryptozoic) is the earliest part of Earth's history, set before the current Phanerozoic
Phanerozoic
Eon. The Precambrian
Precambrian
is so named because it preceded the Cambrian, the first period of the Phanerozoic
Phanerozoic
eon, which is named after Cambria, the Latinised name for Wales, where rocks from this age were first studied. The Precambrian
Precambrian
accounts for 88% of the Earth's geologic time. The Precambrian
Precambrian
(colored green in the timeline figure) is a supereon that is subdivided into three eons (Hadean, Archean, Proterozoic) of the geologic time scale
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Varangerfjord
The Varangerfjord
Varangerfjord
(English: Varanger Fjord;[1][2][3] Russian: Варангер-фьорд, Варяжский залив; Finnish: Varanginvuono; Northern Sami: Várjavuonna) is the easternmost fjord in Norway. The fjord is located in Finnmark
Finnmark
county between the Varanger Peninsula
Varanger Peninsula
and the mainland of Norway. The fjord flows through the municipalities of Vardø, Vadsø, Nesseby, and Sør-Varanger. The fjord is approximately 100 kilometres (62 mi) long, emptying into the Barents Sea. In a strict sense, it is a false fjord, since it does not have the hallmarks of a fjord carved by glaciers. Its mouth is about 70 kilometres (43 mi) wide, located between the town of Vardø
Vardø
in the northwest and the village of Grense Jakobselv in the southeast
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German Language
No official regulation ( German orthography
German orthography
regulated by the Council for German Orthography[4]). Language
Language
codesISO 639-1 deISO 639-2 ger
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Norwegian Language
no – inclusive code Individual codes: nb – Bokmål nn – NynorskISO 639-2nor – inclusive code Individual codes: nob – Bokmål nno – NynorskISO 639-3 nor – inclusive code Individual codes: nob – Bokmål nno – NynorskGlottolog norw1258[2]Linguasphere 52-AAA-ba to -be; 52-AAA-cf to -cgAreas where Norwegian is spoken, including North Dakota
North Dakota
(where 0.4% of the population speaks Norwegian) and Minnesota
Minnesota
(0.1% of the population) (Data: U.S. Census 2000).This article contains IPA phonetic symbols. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of Unicode
Unicode
characters
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