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Columbia Black-tailed Deer
Two forms of black-tailed deer or blacktail deer that occupy coastal woodlands in the Pacific Northwest
Pacific Northwest
are subspecies of the mule deer ( Odocoileus
Odocoileus
hemionus)
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Olympic National Park
Olympic National Park
Olympic National Park
is located in the state of Washington, on the Olympic Peninsula.[3] The park has four basic regions: the Pacific coastline, alpine areas, the west side temperate rainforest and the forests of the drier east side.[4] Within the park there are three distinct ecosystems which are sub-alpine forest and wildflower meadow, temperate forest, and the rugged Pacific Shore. These three different ecosystems are in pristine condition and have outstanding scenery.[5] U.S. President
U.S. President
Theodore Roosevelt
Theodore Roosevelt
originally created Mount Olympus National Monument on 2 March 1909.[6][7] It was designated a national park by President Franklin Roosevelt
Franklin Roosevelt
on June 29, 1938
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IUCN Red List
The IUCN
IUCN
Red List of Threatened Species
Species
(also known as the IUCN
IUCN
Red List or Red Data List), founded in 1964, is the world's most comprehensive inventory of the global conservation status of biological species. The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) is the world's main authority on the conservation status of species. A series of Regional Red Lists are produced by countries or organizations, which assess the risk of extinction to species within a political management unit. The IUCN
IUCN
Red List is set upon precise criteria to evaluate the extinction risk of thousands of species and subspecies. These criteria are relevant to all species and all regions of the world. The aim is to convey the urgency of conservation issues to the public and policy makers, as well as help the international community to try to reduce species extinction
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West Texas
West Texas
Texas
is a loosely defined part of the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Texas, generally encompassing the arid and semiarid lands west of a line drawn between the cities of Abilene and Del Rio. There is no consensus on the boundary between East Texas
Texas
and West Texas.[1] While most Texans understand these terms, there are no officially recognized boundaries and any two individuals are likely to describe the boundaries of these regions differently. Walter Prescott Webb, the American historian and geographer, suggested that the 98th meridian separates East and West Texas;[2] Texas
Texas
writer A.C. Greene proposed that West Texas
Texas
extends west of the Brazos River.[3] West Texas
Texas
is often subdivided according to distinct physiographic features
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Survival Rate
Survival rate is a part of survival analysis. It is the percentage of people in a study or treatment group still alive for a given period of time after diagnosis. Survival rates are important for prognosis, but because the rate is based on the population as a whole, an individual prognosis may be different depending on newer treatments since the last statistical analysis as well as the overall general health of the patient.[citation needed][1] There are various types of survival rates (discussed below)
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Underbrush
In forestry and ecology, understory (or understorey, underbrush, undergrowth) comprises plant life growing beneath the forest canopy without penetrating it to any great extent, but above the forest floor. Only a small percentage of light penetrates the canopy so understory vegetation is generally shade tolerant. The understory typically consists of trees stunted through lack of light, other small trees with low light requirements, saplings, shrubs, vines and undergrowth. Small trees such as holly and dogwood are understory specialists. In temperate deciduous forests, many understory plants start into growth earlier than the canopy trees to make use of the greater availability of light at this time of year. A gap in the canopy caused by the death of a tree stimulates the potential emergent trees into competitive growth as they grow upwards to fill the gap. These trees tend to have straight trunks and few lower branches
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Western Poison Oak
Rhus diversiloba Torr. & A.Gray Toxicodendron
Toxicodendron
diversilobum (syn. Rhus diversiloba), commonly named Pacific poison oak[1] or western poison oak, is a woody vine or shrub in the Anacardiaceae
Anacardiaceae
(sumac) family
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Alexander Archipelago Wolf
The Alexander Archipelago wolf (Canis lupus ligoni), also known as the Islands wolf,[3] is a subspecies of the gray wolf, Canis lupus. The coastal wolves of southeast Alaska inhabit the area that includes the Alexander Archipelago, its islands, and a narrow strip of rugged coastline that is biologically isolated from the rest of North America by the Coast Mountains.[4] The Tongass National Forest comprises about 80% of the region.[5] In 1993, a petition to list the Alexander Archipelago wolf as threatened under the U.S. Endangered Species Act was lodged with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The agency decided in 1997 that listing was not warranted at that time.[6][7] In the interim, a multiagency conservation assessment of the species was published.[8] In 2011, a second petition to list the species as either threatened or endangered was filed with the Fish and Wildlife Service
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United States Fish And Wildlife Service
The United States Fish
Fish
and Wildlife
Wildlife
Service (USFWS or FWS) is an agency of the federal government within the U.S. Department of the Interior dedicated to the management of fish, wildlife, and natural habitats
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Tongass National Forest
The Tongass National Forest
Tongass National Forest
/ˈtɒŋɡəs/ in Southeast Alaska
Alaska
is the largest national forest in the United States
United States
at 17 million acres (69,000 km2). Most of its area is part of the temperate rain forest WWF ecoregion, itself part of the larger Pacific temperate rain forest WWF ecoregion, and is remote enough to be home to many species of endangered and rare flora and fauna. The Tongass, which is managed by the United States
United States
Forest Service, encompasses islands of the Alexander Archipelago, fjords and glaciers, and peaks of the Coast Mountains. An international border with Canada
Canada
(British Columbia) runs along the crest of the Boundary Ranges
Boundary Ranges
of the Coast Mountains.[2] The forest is administered from Forest Service offices in Ketchikan
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Carrying Capacity
The carrying capacity of a biological species in an environment is the maximum population size of the species that the environment can sustain indefinitely, given the food, habitat, water, and other necessities available in the environment. In population biology, carrying capacity is defined as the environment's maximal load,[1] which is different from the concept of population equilibrium. Its effect on population dynamics may be approximated in a logistic model, although this simplification ignores the possibility of overshoot which real systems may exhibit. Carrying capacity
Carrying capacity
was originally used to determine the number of animals that could graze on a segment of land without destroying it. Later, the idea was expanded to more complex populations, like humans.[2] For the human population, more complex variables such as sanitation and medical care are sometimes considered as part of the necessary establishment
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Data Set
A data set (or dataset) is a collection of data. Most commonly a data set corresponds to the contents of a single database table, or a single statistical data matrix, where every column of the table represents a particular variable, and each row corresponds to a given member of the data set in question. The data set lists values for each of the variables, such as height and weight of an object, for each member of the data set. Each value is known as a datum. The data set may comprise data for one or more members, corresponding to the number of rows. The term data set may also be used more loosely, to refer to the data in a collection of closely related tables, corresponding to a particular experiment or event. An example of this type is the data sets collected by space agencies performing experiments with instruments aboard space probes
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9th Circuit Court Of Appeals
The United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit
United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit
(in case citations, 9th Cir.) is a U.S. Federal court with appellate jurisdiction over the district courts in the following districts:District of Alaska District of Arizona Central District of California Eastern District of California Northern District of California Southern District of California District of Hawaii District of Idaho District of Montana District of Nevada District of Oregon Eastern District of Washington Western District of WashingtonIt also has appellate jurisdiction over the following territorial courts:District of Guam District of the Northern Mariana IslandsHeadquartered in San Francisco, California, the Ninth Circuit is by far the largest of the thirteen courts of appeals, with 29 active judgeships
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International Union For Conservation Of Nature
The International Union for Conservation of Nature
International Union for Conservation of Nature
(IUCN; officially International Union for Conservation of Nature
International Union for Conservation of Nature
and Natural Resources[2]) is an international organization working in the field of nature conservation and sustainable use of natural resources. It is involved in data gathering and analysis, research, field projects, advocacy, and education. IUCN's mission is to "influence, encourage and assist societies throughout the world to conserve nature and to ensure that any use of natural resources is equitable and ecologically sustainable". Over the past decades, IUCN has widened its focus beyond conservation ecology and now incorporates issues related to sustainable development in its projects. Unlike many other international environmental organisations, IUCN does not itself aim to mobilize the public in support of nature conservation
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White-tailed Deer
38, see text White-tailed deer
White-tailed deer
range mapSynonymsDama virginiana Zimmermann, 1780 Dama virginianus Zimmermann, 1780The white-tailed deer ( Odocoileus
Odocoileus
virginianus), also known as the whitetail or Virginia deer, is a medium-sized deer native to the United States, Canada, Mexico, Central America, and South America
South America
as far south as Peru
Peru
and Bolivia.[2] It has also been introduced to New Zealand, Cuba, Jamaica, Hispaniola, Puerto Rico, Bahamas, Lesser Antilles, and some countries in Europe, such as Finland, the Czech Republic, and Serbia.[3][4] In the Americas, it is the most widely distributed wild ungulate. In North America, the species is widely distributed east of the Rocky Mountains, but elsewhere, it is mostly replaced by the black-tailed or mule deer ( Odocoileus
Odocoileus
hemionus)
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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