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Colt-Burgess Rifle
The Colt-Burgess rifle
Colt-Burgess rifle
– also known as the 1883 Burgess rifle or simply the Burgess rifle – is a lever-action repeating rifle produced by Colt's Patent Firearms Manufacturing Company between 1883 and 1885. The Burgess rifle was Colt's only entrance into the lever-action rifle market, produced to compete with Winchester Repeating Arms Company's line of popular rifles.[2][3] The 1883 Burgess rifle was designed and patented by Andrew Burgess, an American firearms designer and photographer, who sold the design to Colt.[4][5]Contents1 Overview 2 Production 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksOverview[edit] The Colt-Burgess rifle
Colt-Burgess rifle
is similar in design to Winchester's lever-action rifles, such as the Winchester Model 1873
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Rifle
Evolution of the modern rifle: Top: Baker rifle, an early 19th-century flintlock rifle. Second: Pattern 1853 Enfield, a mid 19th-century caplock rifled musket. Third: Dreyse needle gun, the first standard issue military breechloading rifle. Fourth: Henry rifle, the first successful lever action repeating rifle. Fifth: Lebel Model 1886 rifle, a late 19th-century bolt-action rifle and the first to use smokeless powder. Sixth: M1 Garand, an early 20th-century semi-automatic rifle and the first to be adopted as standard military issue. Seventh: АК-47, a mid 20th-century gas-operated, magazine-fed automatic rifle. Eighth: FAMAS, a late 20th-century selective fire, bullpup assault rifle.A rifle is a portable long-barrelled firearm designed for precision shooting, to be held with both hands and braced against the shoulder during firing, and with a barrel that has a helical pattern of grooves ("rifling") cut into the bore walls
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Receiver (firearms)
In firearms terminology, the firearm receiver or firearm frame is the part of a firearm which provides housing for internal components such as the hammer, bolt or breechblock, action and firing mechanism, and is usually threaded at its forward portion to "receive" the barrel and has screw holes on the bottom and/or rear to receive the stock and grip.[1] The receiver is often made of forged, machined, or stamped steel or aluminium; in addition to these traditional materials, modern science and engineering have introduced polymers and sintered metal powders to receiver construction.[2]Contents1 In US law1.1 Unfinished receivers2 Notable receivers 3 ReferencesIn US law[edit] AR-15
AR-15
rifles showing their configurations with different upper receivers (stripped-down lower receiver is visible at bottom)For the purposes of United States law, the receiver or frame is legally the firearm,[3] and as such it is the controlled part
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American Rifleman
American Rifleman
American Rifleman
is a United States-based monthly shooting and firearms interest publication, owned by the National Rifle Association (NRA). It is the 33rd most-widely distributed consumer magazine and the NRA's primary magazine.[2] The magazine has its headquarters in Fairfax, Virginia.[3]Contents1 History 2 Content 3 Notes 4 External linksHistory[edit] Arthur Corbin Gould, an avid shooter and member of the Massachusetts Rifle Association, published The Rifle in 1885 as an effort to focus discussion on the sport of rifle shooting.[4] The Rifle later changed its title to Shooting and Fishing in 1888, branching out into other outdoor sports
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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International Standard Serial Number
An International Standard Serial Number
International Standard Serial Number
(ISSN) is an eight-digit serial number used to uniquely identify a serial publication.[1] The ISSN is especially helpful in distinguishing between serials with the same title. ISSN are used in ordering, cataloging, interlibrary loans, and other practices in connection with serial literature.[2] The ISSN system was first drafted as an International Organization for Standardization (ISO) international standard in 1971 and published as ISO 3297 in 1975.[3] ISO subcommittee TC 46/SC 9 is responsible for maintaining the standard. When a serial with the same content is published in more than one media type, a different ISSN is assigned to each media type. For example, many serials are published both in print and electronic media
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Gentleman's Agreement
A gentlemen's agreement or gentleman's agreement is an informal and legally non-binding agreement between two or more parties. It is typically oral, though it may be written, or simply understood as part of an unspoken agreement by convention or through mutually beneficial etiquette. The essence of a gentlemen's agreement is that it relies upon the honor of the parties for its fulfillment, rather than being in any way enforceable. It is, therefore, distinct from a legal agreement or contract, which can be enforced if necessary.Contents1 History1.1 Industry 1.2 International relations 1.3 Trade policies 1.4 As a discriminatory tactic2 See also 3 ReferencesHistory[edit] The phrase appears in British Parliamentary records of 1821,[1] and in Massachusetts public records of 1835.[2] The Oxford English Dictionary cites P. G
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Revolver
A revolver (also called a wheel gun[1][2]) is a repeating handgun that has a revolving cylinder containing multiple chambers and at least one barrel for firing. Revolvers might be regarded as a type of pistol, or as a subset of handguns, distinct from pistols, which in this case are defined as handguns with a single chamber. The revolver allows the user to fire multiple rounds without reloading after every shot, unlike older single shot firearms. After a round is fired the hammer is cocked and the next chamber in the cylinder is aligned with the barrel by the shooter either manually pulling the hammer back (single action operation) or by rearward movement of the trigger (double action operation). Revolvers still remain popular as back-up and off-duty handguns among American law enforcement
American law enforcement
officers and security guards and are still common in the American private sector as defensive and sporting/hunting firearms
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Case Hardening
Case-hardening
Case-hardening
or surface hardening is the process of hardening the surface of a metal object while allowing the metal deeper underneath to remain soft, thus forming a thin layer of harder metal (called the "case") at the surface
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Bluing (steel)
Bluing is a passivation process in which steel is partially protected against rust, and is named after the blue-black appearance of the resulting protective finish. True gun bluing is an electrochemical conversion coating resulting from an oxidizing chemical reaction with iron on the surface selectively forming magnetite (Fe3O4), the black oxide of iron. Black oxide
Black oxide
provides minimal protection against corrosion, unless also treated with a water-displacing oil to reduce wetting and galvanic action
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Winchester Rifle
Winchester rifle
Winchester rifle
is a comprehensive term describing a series of lever-action repeating rifles manufactured by the Winchester Repeating Arms Company. Developed from the 1860 Henry rifle, Winchester rifles were among the earliest repeaters. The Model 1873 was particularly successful, being colloquially known as "The Gun that Won the West".Contents1 Predecessors 2 Development 3 Winchester lever-action repeating rifles3.1 Model 1866 3.2 Model 1873 3.3 Model 1876 3.4 Model 1886 3.5 Model 1892 3.6 Model 1894 3.7 Model 1895 3.8 Model 88 3.9 Model 94224 Legacy 5 See also 6 Footnotes 7 References 8 External linksPredecessors[edit]Volcanic pistol.1860 Henry and 1866 Winchester Musket.Left to right Carbines two 1873/1894/92/Trapper 92.In 1848, Walter Hunt of New York patented his "Volition Repeating Rifle" incorporating a tubular magazine, which was operated by two levers and complex linkages
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Winchester Repeating Arms Company
Olin Corporation
Olin Corporation
(Ammunition) Herstal Group
Herstal Group
(Firearms)Websitewww.winchesterguns.com www.winchester.comThe Winchester Repeating Arms Company
Winchester Repeating Arms Company
was a prominent American maker of repeating firearms, located in New Haven, Connecticut
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Repeating Rifle
A repeating rifle, or repeater for short, is a single-barrel rifle capable of repeated discharges following a single ammunition reload, typically by having multiple cartridges stored in a magazine (within or attached to the gun) and then fed into the chamber by the bolt via either a manual or automatic mechanism, while the act of chambering the rifle typically also recocks the action for the following shot. In common usage, the term "repeating rifle" most often refers specifically to manually-operated weapons, as opposed to self-loading rifles, which use the recoil and blowback of the previous shot to cycle the action and load the next round, even though all self-loading firearms are technically a subcategory of repeating firearms. Repeating rifles were a significant advance over the preceding single-shot breechloading rifles when used for military combat, as they allowed a much greater rate of fire
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Action (firearms)
In firearms terminology, an action is the mechanism that handles the ammunition (loads, locks, fires, extracts and ejects) or the method by which that mechanism works. Breech-loading weapons have actions; actions are technically not present on muzzleloaders, as all are single-shot weapons with a closed off breech. Actions can be categorized in several ways, including single action versus double action, break action versus bolt action, and others. The term action can also include short, long, and magnum if it is in reference to the length of the rifle’s receiver and the length of the bolt. The short action rifle usually can accommodate a cartridge length of 2.8 in (71 mm) or smaller
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.44-40 Winchester
The .44-40 Winchester, also known as .44 Winchester, .44 WCF (Winchester Center Fire), and .44 Largo (in Spanish speaking countries) was introduced in 1873 by the Winchester Repeating Arms Company. It was the first metallic centerfire cartridge manufactured by Winchester, and was promoted as the standard chambering for the new Winchester Model 1873 rifle.[1][2] As both a rifle and a handgun caliber, the cartridge soon became widely popular, so much so that the Winchester Model 1873 rifle became known as "The gun that won the West."[3]Contents1 History 2 Technical background 3 See also 4 ReferencesHistory[edit] When Winchester released the new cartridge, many other firearm companies chambered their guns in the new round
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