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College Of St. Benedict
The College of Saint Benedict (CSB), a women's college, and Saint John's University (SJU), a men's college, are private liberal arts colleges respectively located in St. Joseph and Collegeville, Minnesota, United States, near St. Cloud. Under CSB's and SJU's coordinate relationship, students at the two colleges have a shared curriculum, and access to the resources of both campuses.Contents1 History1.1 Saint John's University 1.2 College of Saint Benedict 1.3 Institutional partnership2 Academics2.1 Academic Distinctions 2.2 Academic Profile 2.3 Phi Beta Kappa 2.4 Study Abroad 2.5 Internationalization 2.6 Music 2.7 Center for Ethical Leadership in Action3 Campus3.1 Residential Life3.1.1 Saint John's Residence Halls 3.1.2 St
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Private University
Private universities are typically not operated by governments, although many receive tax breaks, public student loans, and grants. Depending on their location, private universities may be subject to government regulation. This is in contrast to public universities and national universities
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American College & University Presidents' Climate Commitment
The American College & University Presidents' Climate Commitment (ACUPCC) is a “high-visibility effort” to address global warming (global climate disruption) by creating a network of colleges and universities that have committed to neutralize their greenhouse gas emissions and accelerate the research and educational efforts of higher education to equip society to re-stabilize the earth’s climate.[1] Second Nature is the main supporting organization of the ACUPCC.Contents1 Definition of sustainable development 2 Mission 3 ACUPCC agreement 4 History 5 12 founding signatories 6 Current signatories 7 External links 8 ReferencesDefinition of sustainable development[edit] The commonly accepted definition of sustainable development is defined as, “development that meets the needs of the present with- out compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.” [2] However, as pointed out by Lander Medlin, APPA’s executive vice president,
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Master Of Arts
A Master of Arts
Arts
(Latin: Magister Artium; abbreviated MA; also Latin: Artium Magister, abbreviated AM) is a person who was admitted to a type of master's degree awarded by universities in many countries, and the degree is also named Master of Arts
Arts
in colloquial speech. The degree is usually contrasted with the Master of Science. Those admitted to the degree typically study linguistics, history, communication studies, diplomacy, public administration, political science, or other subjects within the scope of the humanities and social sciences; however, different universities have different conventions and may also offer the degree for fields typically considered within the natural sciences and mathematics
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Minnesota Public Radio
Minnesota
Minnesota
Public Radio (MPR), is a public radio network for the state of Minnesota. With its three services, News
News
& Information, Classical Music and The Current, MPR operates a 44-station regional radio network in the upper Midwest serving over 9 million people. MPR has 127,150 members and more than one million listeners each week, the largest audience of any regional public radio network.[1] Minnesota
Minnesota
Public Radio has won more than 875 journalism awards, including the Peabody Award,[2][3] both the RTNDA Edward R. Murrow Award and the Corporation for Public Broadcasting
Corporation for Public Broadcasting
award of the same name, and the Alfred I
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Phi Beta Kappa
The Phi Beta Kappa Society
Phi Beta Kappa Society
(ΦΒΚ) is the oldest honor society for the liberal arts and sciences in the United States
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St. Cloud State University
St. Cloud State University
St. Cloud State University
(SCSU) is a public university founded in 1869 above the Beaver Islands[8] on the Mississippi River
Mississippi River
in St. Cloud, Minnesota, United States. The university is one of the largest schools in the Minnesota
Minnesota
State Colleges and Universities (MnSCU) system, which is the largest provider of higher education in Minnesota.[9] A regional comprehensive university, St
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A Cappella
A cappella
A cappella
[a kapˈpɛlla] (Italian for "in the manner of the chapel")[1] music is specifically group or solo singing without instrumental accompaniment, or a piece intended to be performed in this way. It contrasts with cantata, which is usually accompanied singing. The term "a cappella" was originally intended to differentiate between Renaissance polyphony and Baroque concertato style
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Marcel Breuer
Marcel Lajos Breuer (/ˈbrɔɪ.ər/ BROY-ər; 21 May 1902 – 1 July 1981), was a Hungarian-born modernist, architect, and furniture designer
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Brutalist Architecture
Brutalist architecture
Brutalist architecture
flourished from the 1950s to the mid-1970s, descending from the modernist architectural movement of the early 20th century.[1] The term originates from the French word for "raw", as Le Corbusier described his choice of material béton brut, meaning raw concrete in French.[2][3] Architects Alison and Peter Smithson
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Historic Districts In The United States
In the United States, a historic district is a group of buildings, properties, or sites that have been designated by one of several entities on different levels as historically or architecturally significant. Buildings, structures, objects and sites within a historic district are normally divided into two categories, contributing and non-contributing. Districts greatly vary in size: some have hundreds of structures, while others have just a few. The U.S. federal government designates historic districts through the United States
United States
Department of Interior under the auspices of the National Park Service. Federally designated historic districts are listed on the National Register of Historic Places, but listing usually imposes no restrictions on what property owners may do with a designated property. State-level historic districts may follow similar criteria (no restrictions) or may require adherence to certain historic rehabilitation standards
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National Register Of Historic Places
The National Register of Historic Places
National Register of Historic Places
(NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred preserving the property. The passage of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) in 1966 established the National Register and the process for adding properties to it. Of the more than one million properties on the National Register, 80,000 are listed individually
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Benedicta Arts Center
The Benedicta Arts Center (BAC) is a performing arts center located on the campus of the College of Saint Benedict. Built in 1964 by the Sisters of the Order of Saint Benedict
Order of Saint Benedict
in the city of St. Joseph, MN, the Benedicta Arts Center has remained a powerhouse for the arts in Central Minnesota. The BAC presents three annual performances by the Minnesota
Minnesota
Orchestra and has recently commissioned works by Diavolo and Merce Cunningham Dance Company The BAC houses the Theater Department, and half of the music and art departments for the College of Saint Benedict/Saint John's University. The building also houses 2 art galleries, a music library and 6 class rooms
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King Ludwig II
Ludwig II (German: Ludwig Otto Friedrich Wilhelm; English: Louis Otto Frederick William; 25 August 1845 – 13 June 1886)[1] was King of Bavaria from 1864 until his death in 1886. He is sometimes called the Swan King, Mad King Ludwig or der Märchenkönig ("the Fairy Tale King"). He also held the titles of Count Palatine of the Rhine, Duke of Bavaria, Duke of Franconia, and Duke in Swabia.[2] He succeeded to the throne aged 18. Two years later Bavaria and Austria fought a war against Prussia, which they lost. However, in the Franco-Prussian War
Franco-Prussian War
of 1870 Bavaria sided with Prussia
Prussia
against France, and after the Prussian victory it became part of the new German Empire led by Prussia. Though Bavaria retained a degree of autonomy on some matters within the new German Reich, Ludwig increasingly withdrew from day-to-day affairs of state in favour of extravagant artistic and architectural projects
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Williams College
Williams College
Williams College
is a private liberal arts college in Williamstown, Massachusetts, United States. It was established in 1793 with funds from the estate of Ephraim Williams, a colonist from the Province of Massachusetts
Massachusetts
Bay who was killed in the French and Indian War
French and Indian War
in 1755. The college was ranked first in 2017 in the U.S. News & World Report's liberal arts ranking for the 15th consecutive year,[6][7] and third among liberal art colleges in the 2017 Forbes
Forbes
magazine ranking of America's Top Colleges.[8] Williams is on a 450-acre (1.8 km2) campus in Williamstown, in the Berkshires
Berkshires
in rural northwestern Massachusetts. The campus contains more than 100 academic, athletic, and residential buildings.[9] There are 349 voting faculty members, with a student-to-faculty ratio of 7:1
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University Of Kansas
The University
University
of Kansas, also referred to as KU or Kansas, is a public research university in the U.S. state of Kansas. The main campus in Lawrence, one of the largest college towns in Kansas,[6] is on Mount Oread, the highest elevation in Lawrence. Two branch campuses are in the Kansas
Kansas
City metropolitan area: the Edwards Campus in Overland Park, Kansas, and the university's medical school and hospital in Kansas
Kansas
City, Kansas. There are also educational and research sites in Parsons, Kansas, Topeka, Kansas, Garden City, Kansas, Hays, Kansas, and Leavenworth, Kansas, and branches of the medical school in Wichita, Kansas
Kansas
and Salina, Kansas
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