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College Of Cardinals
The College of Cardinals, formerly styled the Sacred College of Cardinals, is the body of all cardinals of the Catholic Church.[1] Its membership is 214, as of 19 March 2018.[update] Most cardinals exit the College only by death, although a few leave it by election to the papacy, and still fewer leave by resignation or dismissal. Changes in life expectancy partly account for the increases in the size of the College.[2] Since the emergence of the College of Cardinals
College of Cardinals
in the Early Middle Ages, the size of the body has historically been limited by popes, ecumenical councils, and even the College itself
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Apostolic Succession
Apostolic succession
Apostolic succession
is the method whereby the ministry of the Christian Church
Christian Church
is held to be derived from the apostles by a continuous succession, which has usually been associated with a claim that the succession is through a series of bishops.[1] This series was seen originally as that of the bishops of a particular see founded by one or more of the apostles. According to historian Justo L. González, apostolic succession is generally understood today as meaning a series of bishops, regardless of see, each consecrated by other bishops, themselves consecrated similarly in a succession going back to the apostles.[2] According to the Joint International Commission for Theological Dialogue Between the Catholic Church
Catholic Church
and the Orthodox Church, "apostolic succession" means more than a mere transmission of powers
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Passion Of Jesus
Portals: Christianity
Christianity
Bible  Book:Life of Jesusv t eIn Christianity, the Passion (from Late Latin: passionem "suffering, enduring"[1]) is the short final period in the life of Jesus
Jesus
covering his entrance visit to Jerusalem
Jerusalem
and leading to his crucifixion on Mount Calvary, defining the climactic event central to Christian doctrine of salvation history. The commemoration begins with the portent grievance of the Blessed Virgin Mary, followed by Jesus' triumphal entry into Jerusalem
Jerusalem
and includes his institution of the Eucharist
Eucharist
at Last Supper, his bleeding and Agony in the Garden
Agony in the Garden
followed by his arrest by the Sanhedrin priests and ultimate trial before Pontius Pilate. Those parts of the four Gospels that describe these events are known as the "Passion narratives"
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Trinity
The Christian doctrine of the Trinity
Trinity
(Latin: Trinitas, lit. 'triad', from trinus, "threefold")[2] holds that God
God
is three consubstantial persons[3] or hypostases[4]—the Father, the Son ( Jesus
Jesus
Christ), and the Holy Spirit—as "one God
God
in three Divine Persons"
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Jesus In Christianity
In Christianity, Jesus
Jesus
is believed to be the Messiah
Messiah
(Christ) and through his crucifixion and resurrection, humans can be reconciled to God and thereby are offered salvation and the promise of eternal life.[2] These teachings emphasize that as the willing Lamb of God, Jesus
Jesus
chose to suffer on the cross at Calvary
Calvary
as a sign of his full obedience to the will of God the Father, as an "agent and servant of God".[3][4] The choice Jesus
Jesus
made thus counter-positions him as a new man of morality and obedience, in contrast to Adam's disobedience.[5] Christians believe that Jesus
Jesus
was both human and divine—the Son of God
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Holy Spirit (Christianity)
For the majority of Christian denominations, the Holy Spirit
Holy Spirit
or Holy Ghost is the third person (hypostasis) of the Trinity: the Triune God manifested as God the Father, God the Son, and Holy Spirit; each person itself being God.[2][3][4] Some Christian theologians identify the Holy Spirit
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Early Christianity
Early Christianity
Christianity
is the period of Christianity
Christianity
preceding the First Council of Nicaea in 325. It is typically divided into the Apostolic Age and the Ante-Nicene Period
Ante-Nicene Period
(from the Apostolic Age
Apostolic Age
until Nicea). The first Christians, as described in the first chapters of the Acts of the Apostles, were all Jews
Jews
either by birth or conversion, for which the biblical term "proselyte" is used,[1] and referred to by historians as Jewish Christians
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Ascension Of Jesus
Portals: Christianity
Christianity
Bible  Book:Life of Jesusv t eAccording to the Bible, the Ascension of Jesus
Jesus
(anglicized from the Vulgate
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Resurrection Of Jesus
The resurrection of Jesus
Jesus
or resurrection of Christ is the Christian religious belief that, after being put to death, Jesus
Jesus
rose again from the dead
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Crucifixion Of Jesus
The crucifixion of Jesus
Jesus
occurred in 1st century Judea, most likely between AD 30 and 33. Jesus' crucifixion is described in the four canonical gospels, referred to in the New Testament
New Testament
epistles, attested to by other ancient sources, and is established as a historical event confirmed by non-Christian sources,[1] although among historians, there is no consensus on the precise details of what exactly occurred.[2][3][4] According to the canonical gospels, Jesus, the Christ, was arrested and tried by the Sanhedrin, and then sentenced by Pontius Pilate
Pontius Pilate
to be scourged, and finally crucified by the Romans.[5][6][7][8] Jesus
Jesus
was stripped of his clothing and offered wine mixed with myrrh or gall to drink before being crucified
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Jesus
Jesus[e] (c. 4 BC – c. AD 30 / 33), also referred to as Jesus
Jesus
of Nazareth
Nazareth
and Jesus
Jesus
Christ,[f] was a first-century Jewish preacher and religious leader.[12] He is the central figure of Christianity
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Purgatory
In Roman Catholic
Roman Catholic
theology, purgatory (Latin: Purgatorium, via Anglo-Norman and Old French)[1] is an intermediate state after physical death in which some of those ultimately destined for heaven must first "undergo purification, so as to achieve the holiness necessary to enter the joy of heaven," holding that "certain offenses can be forgiven in this age, but certain others in the age to come."[2] And that entrance into Heaven
Heaven
requires the "remission before God of the temporal punishment due to sins whose guilt has already been forgiven," for which indulgences may be given which remove "either part or all of the temporal punishment due to sin," such as an "unhealthy attachment" to sin.[3] Only those who die in the state of grace but have not yet fulfilled the temporal punishment due to their sin can be in purgatory, and therefore, no one in purgatory will remain forever in that state nor go to hell
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Paschal Mystery
Paschal Mystery is one of the central concepts of Catholic faith relating to the history of salvation. Its main subject is the passion, death, and Resurrection of Jesus
Resurrection of Jesus
Christ – the work God the Father sent his Son to accomplish on earth. According to the Compendium of the Catechism of the Catholic Church, "The Paschal Mystery accomplished once for all by the redemptive death of His Son Jesus Christ."[1] The Catechism states that in the liturgy of the Church which revolves around the seven sacraments, "it is principally his own Paschal mystery
Paschal mystery
that Christ signifies and makes present."[2][3] Catholic, Anglican
Anglican
and Orthodox Christian churches celebrate this mystery on Easter
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Harrowing Of Hell
In Christian theology, the Harrowing of Hell
Hell
(Latin: Descensus Christi ad Inferos, "the descent of Christ
Christ
into hell") is the triumphant descent of Christ
Christ
into Hell
Hell
(or Hades) between the time of his Crucifixion and his Resurrection
Resurrection
when he brought salvation to all of the righteous who had died since the beginning of the world.[1] After his death, the soul of Jesus
Jesus
was supposed to have descended into the realm of the dead. The Harrowing of Hell
Hell
is referred to in the Apostles' Creed
Apostles' Creed
and the Athanasian Creed
Athanasian Creed
(Quicumque vult) which state that Jesus
Jesus
Christ "descended into Hell"
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Perpetual Virginity Of Mary
The perpetual virginity of Mary is a Marian doctrine taught by the Catholic Church
Catholic Church
and held by a number of groups in Christianity which asserts that Mary (the mother of Jesus) was "always a virgin, before, during and after the birth of Jesus
Jesus
Christ
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St. Peter's Basilica
The Papal Basilica
Basilica
of St. Peter
St. Peter
in the Vatican (Italian: Basilica Papale di San Pietro in Vaticano), or simply St. Peter's Basilica (Latin: Basilica
Basilica
Sancti Petri), is an Italian Renaissance
Italian Renaissance
church in Vatican City, the papal enclave within the city of Rome. Designed principally by Donato Bramante, Michelangelo, Carlo Maderno and Gian Lorenzo Bernini, St. Peter's is the most renowned work of Renaissance architecture[2] and the largest church in the world.[3] While it is neither the mother church of the Catholic Church
Catholic Church
nor the cathedral of the Diocese
Diocese
of Rome, St. Peter's is regarded as one of the holiest Catholic shrines
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