HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

Colin Starnes
Colin John Starnes is a professor, author, and former President of the University of King's College
University of King's College
in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. Starnes joined the faculty of King's in 1972, and the Dalhousie University faculty in 1977. He taught at both of the linked universities, retiring in 2005. Although he is retired, he still lectures on certain topics in the Foundation Year Programme at King's, including The Divine Comedy. He holds degrees from Bishop's University, Harvard University, McGill University, and Dalhousie. Starnes was the President of King's from 1993 until 2003.[1] He replaced Marion Golda Fry and was succeeded by William Barker. Starnes is an authority on Saint Augustine
Saint Augustine
and Thomas More
[...More...]

"Colin Starnes" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Wilfrid Laurier University Press
Wilfrid Laurier University
Wilfrid Laurier University
Press, based in Waterloo, Ontario, is a publisher of scholarly writing and is part of Wilfrid Laurier University. The fourth-largest university press in Canada, WLUP publishes work in a variety of disciplines in the humanities and social sciences—literary criticism, aboriginal studies, sociology, environmental studies, and history among them—as well as culturally significant books of regional interest
[...More...]

"Wilfrid Laurier University Press" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Thomas More
Sir Thomas More
Thomas More
(/mɔːr/; 7 February 1478 – 6 July 1535), venerated in the Catholic Church
Catholic Church
as Saint Thomas More,[1][2] was an English lawyer, social philosopher, author, statesman, and noted Renaissance humanist. He was also a councillor to Henry VIII, and Lord High Chancellor of England
England
from October 1529 to 16 May 1532.[3] He wrote Utopia, published in 1516, about the political system of an imaginary, ideal island nation. More opposed the Protestant Reformation, in particular the theology of Martin Luther
Martin Luther
and William Tyndale. More also opposed the king's separation from the Catholic Church, refusing to acknowledge Henry as Supreme Head of the Church of England
England
and the annulment of his marriage to Catherine of Aragon. After refusing to take the Oath of Supremacy, he was convicted of treason and beheaded
[...More...]

"Thomas More" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

International Standard Name Identifier
The International Standard Name Identifier (ISNI) is an identifier for uniquely identifying the public identities of contributors to media content such as books, television programmes, and newspaper articles. Such an identifier consists of 16 digits. It can optionally be displayed as divided into four blocks. It was developed under the auspices of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) as Draft International Standard 27729; the valid standard was published on 15 March 2012
[...More...]

"International Standard Name Identifier" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Dionysius (journal)
Dionysius is a scholarly journal published by the Department of Classics at Dalhousie University. It was established originally in 1977, and a new series began in 1998.[1] It publishes articles on the history of ancient philosophy and theology, and has a special interest in the Aristotelian and Neoplatonic traditions.[2] It also publishes more general articles relating to literature, history, and religion. The original editors-in-chief were J.A. Doull, R.D. Crouse, and A. H. Armstrong, whose Form, Individual, and Person in Plotinus appeared in the first volume. A number of distinguished scholars were among the original editorial advisors, and many of them made contributions in due course to the journal.[according to whom?] Examples include Werner Beierwaltes' Negati Affirmatio or The World as Metaphor: A Foundation for Medieval Aesthetics from the Writings of John Scotus Eriugena and his Cusanus and Eriugena; Mary T. Clark's Augustine's Theology of the Trinity: Its Relevance; J.N
[...More...]

"Dionysius (journal)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

James Doull
James Alexander Doull (1918–2001) was a Canadian philosopher and academic who was born and lived most of his life in Nova Scotia
[...More...]

"James Doull" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Plato
Plato
Plato
(/ˈpleɪtoʊ/;[a][1] Greek: Πλάτων[a] Plátōn, pronounced [plá.tɔːn] in Classical Attic; 428/427 or 424/423[b] – 348/347 BC) was a philosopher in Classical Greece
Classical Greece
and the founder of the Academy
Academy
in Athens, the first institution of higher learning in the Western world
[...More...]

"Plato" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Virgil
Publius Vergilius Maro (Classical Latin: [ˈpuː.blɪ.ʊs wɛrˈɡɪ.lɪ.ʊs ˈma.roː]; traditional dates October 15, 70 BC – September 21, 19 BC[1]), usually called Virgil
Virgil
or Vergil /ˈvɜːrdʒɪl/ in English, was an ancient Roman poet of the Augustan period. He wrote three of the most famous poems in Latin
Latin
literature: the Eclogues
Eclogues
(or Bucolics), the Georgics, and the epic Aeneid. A number of minor poems, collected in the Appendix Vergiliana, are sometimes attributed to him.[2][3] Virgil
Virgil
is traditionally ranked as one of Rome's greatest poets. His Aeneid
Aeneid
has been considered the national epic of ancient Rome
Rome
since the time of its composition
[...More...]

"Virgil" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Halifax Urban Area
Halifax (/ˈhælɪfæks/), legally known as the Halifax Regional Municipality (HRM), is the capital of the province of Nova Scotia, Canada. The municipality had a population of 403,131 in 2016, with 316,701 in the urban area centred on Halifax Harbour.[3][4] The regional municipality consists of four former municipalities that were amalgamated in 1996: Halifax, Dartmouth, Bedford, and the Municipality of Halifax County. Halifax is a major economic centre in Atlantic Canada
Canada
with a large concentration of government services and private sector companies. Major employers and economic generators include the Department of National Defence, Dalhousie University, Saint Mary's University, the Halifax Shipyard, various levels of government, and the Port of Halifax. Agriculture, fishing, mining, forestry and natural gas extraction are major resource industries found in the rural areas of the municipality
[...More...]

"Halifax Urban Area" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Système Universitaire De Documentation
The système universitaire de documentation or SUDOC is a system used by the libraries of French universities and higher education establishments to identify, track and manage the documents in their possession. The catalog, which contains more than 10 million references, allows students and researcher to search for bibliographical and location information in over 3,400 documentation centers. It is maintained by the Bibliographic Agency for Higher Education (fr) (ABES). External links[edit]Official websiteThis article relating to library science or information science is a stub
[...More...]

"Système Universitaire De Documentation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Bibliothèque Nationale De France
The Bibliothèque nationale de France
France
(BnF, English: National Library of France"; French: [bi.bli.jɔ.tɛk na.sjɔ.nal də fʁɑ̃s]) is the national library of France, located in Paris. It is the national repository of all that is published in France
France
and also holds extensive historical collections.Contents1 History 2 New buildings 3 Mission 4 Manuscript
Manuscript
collection 5 Digital library 6 List of directors6.1 1369–1792 6.2 1792–present7 In popular culture 8 See also 9 References 10 Further reading 11 External linksHistory[edit]See also: History of the Bibliothèque nationale de France (fr)The National Library of France
France
traces its origin to the royal library founded at the Louvre Palace
Louvre Palace
by Charles V in 1368
[...More...]

"Bibliothèque Nationale De France" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

McGill University
McGill University
University
is a coeducational public research university in Montreal, Quebec, Canada
[...More...]

"McGill University" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Harvard University
Harvard University
Harvard University
is a private Ivy League
Ivy League
research university in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Established in 1636 and named for clergyman John Harvard (its first benefactor), its history, influence, and wealth have made it one of the world's most prestigious universities.[8] Harvard is the United States' oldest institution of higher learning,[9] and the Harvard Corporation
Harvard Corporation
(formally, the President and Fellows of Harvard College) is its first chartered corporation. Although never formally affiliated with any denomination, the early College primarily trained Congregational and Unitarian clergy. Its curriculum and student body were gradually secularized during the 18th century, and by the 19th century, Harvard had emerged as the central cultural establishment among Boston elites.[10][11] Following the American Civil War, President Charles W
[...More...]

"Harvard University" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Bishop's University
Coordinates: 45°22′0.16″N 71°50′43.67″W / 45.3667111°N 71.8454639°W / 45.3667111; -71.8454639Bishop's UniversityUniversité Bishop's  (French)Motto Recti cultus pectora roborant  (Latin)Motto in EnglishSound learning strengthens the spiritEstablished 1843[1]Affiliation Non-denominationalEndowment C$ 32.5 million[2]Chancellor Brian LevittPrincipal Michael GoldbloomStudents 2,756[3]Undergraduates 2,404 full-time students 352 part-time students[3]Location Sherbrooke
Sherbrooke
(Lennoxville), Quebec, CanadaCampus Rural: 5
[...More...]

"Bishop's University" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

The Divine Comedy
The Divine Comedy
Divine Comedy
(Italian: Divina Commedia [diˈviːna komˈmɛːdja]) is a long narrative poem by Dante Alighieri, begun c. 1308 and completed in 1320, a year before his death in 1321. It is widely considered to be the preeminent work in Italian literature[1] and one of the greatest works of world literature.[2] The poem's imaginative vision of the afterlife is representative of the medieval world-view as it had developed in the Western Church by the 14th century
[...More...]

"The Divine Comedy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
[...More...]

"Special" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.