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Coffered
A coffer (or coffering) in architecture is a series of sunken panels in the shape of a square, rectangle, or octagon in a ceiling, soffit or vault.[1] A series of these sunken panels was often used as decoration for a ceiling or a vault, also called caissons ('boxes"), or lacunaria ("spaces, openings"),[2] so that a coffered ceiling can be called a lacunar ceiling: the strength of the structure is in the framework of the coffers.Contents1 History 2 Asian architecture 3 See also 4 Footnotes 5 External linksHistory[edit] The stone coffers of the ancient Greeks[3] and Romans[4] are the earliest surviving examples, but a seventh-century BC Etruscan chamber tomb in the necropolis of San Giuliano, which is cut in soft tufa-like stone reproduces a ceiling with beams and cross-beams lying on them, with flat panels filling the lacunae.[5] For centuries, it was thought that wooden coffers were first made by crossing the wooden beams of a ceiling in the
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Coffer (other)
A coffer, in architecture, is a sunken panel in a ceiling, soffit or vault. Coffer
Coffer
may also refer to: Coffer
Coffer
(furniture) or chest, a lockable box for storing valuable items
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Beam (structure)
A beam is a structural element that primarily resists loads applied laterally to the beam's axis. Its mode of deflection is primarily by bending. The loads applied to the beam result in reaction forces at the beam's support points. The total effect of all the forces acting on the beam is to produce shear forces and bending moments within the beam, that in turn induce internal stresses, strains and deflections of the beam
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Ancient Chinese Wooden Architecture
Ancient Chinese wooden architecture
Ancient Chinese wooden architecture
is among the least studied of any of the world's great architectural traditions from the western point of view. Although Chinese architectural history reaches far back in time, descriptions of Chinese architecture
Chinese architecture
are often confined to the well known Forbidden City
Forbidden City
with little else explored by the West.[1]:1–5 Although common features of Chinese architecture
Chinese architecture
have been unified into a vocabulary illustrating uniquely Chinese forms and methods, until recently data has not been available
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Caisson (Asian Architecture)
The Caisson (Chinese: 藻井; pinyin: zǎojǐng; literally: "algae well"), also referred to as a caisson ceiling, or spider web ceiling,[1] in East Asian architecture is an architectural feature typically found in the ceiling of temples and palaces, usually at the centre and directly above the main throne, seat, or religious figure.[1][2] The caisson is generally a sunken panel set into the otherwise largely flat[citation needed] ceiling. It is often layered and richly decorated
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Chinese Language
Legend:   Countries identified Chinese as a primary, administrative, or native language   Countries with more than 5,000,000 Chinese speakers   Countries with more than 1,000,000 Chinese speakers   Countries with more than 500,000 Chinese speakers   Countries with more than 100,000 Chinese speakers   Major Chinese-speaking settlementsThis article contains IPA phonetic symbols. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of Unicode
Unicode
characters
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Pinyin
Hanyu Pinyin
Hanyu Pinyin
Romanization
Romanization
(simplified Chinese: 汉语拼音; traditional Chinese: 漢語拼音), often abbreviated to pinyin, is the official romanization system for Standard Chinese
Standard Chinese
in mainland China
China
and to some extent in Taiwan. It is often used to teach Standard Mandarin Chinese, which is normally written using Chinese characters. The system includes four diacritics denoting tones. Pinyin
Pinyin
without tone marks is used to spell Chinese names and words in languages written with the Latin alphabet, and also in certain computer input methods to enter Chinese characters. The pinyin system was developed in the 1950s by many linguists, including Zhou Youguang,[1] based on earlier form romanizations of Chinese
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Coving (interior Design)
Moulding (also spelled molding in the United States though usually not within the industry), also known as coving (United Kingdom, Australia), is a strip of material with various profiles used to cover transitions between surfaces or for decoration. It is traditionally made from solid milled wood or plaster, but may be of plastic or reformed wood. In classical architecture and sculpture, the molding is often carved in marble or other stones. A "plain" moulding has right-angled upper and lower edges. A "sprung" moulding has upper and lower edges that bevel towards its rear, allowing mounting between two non-parallel planes (such as a wall and a ceiling), with an open space behind.Contents1 Types 2 Use 3 See also 4 References 5 Further readingTypes[edit]Moldings from 1728 Table of architecture in the Cyclopedia[1] Decorative
Decorative
moldings have been made of wood, stone and cement
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Rotunda (architecture)
A rotunda (from Latin
Latin
rotundus) is any building with a circular ground plan, and sometimes covered by a dome. It can also refer to a round room within a building (a famous example being within the United States Capitol in Washington, D.C.). The Pantheon in Rome
Rome
is a famous rotunda. A Band Rotunda is a circular bandstand, usually with a dome.Contents1 Rotunda in Central Europe1.1 Rotunda in the Carpathian Basin2 Rotunda in the Caucasus 3 Rotunda in Asia 4 Notable rotundas4.1 Religious buildings 4.2 Buildings for entertainment 4.3 Residential buildings 4.4 Buildings for learning 4.5 Government buildings 4.6 Commercial buildings5 See also 6 References6.1 Further reading7 External linksRotunda in Central Europe[edit] The rotunda has historical and architectural value because it was widespread in medieval Central Europe
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
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Domitian
14 September 81 – 18 September 96 (15 years)Predecessor TitusSuccessor NervaBorn (51-10-24)24 October 51 RomeDied 18 September 96(96-09-18) (aged 44) RomeBurial RomeWife Domitia Longina
Domitia Longina
(70–96)Issue son (80–83)Full name Titus
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Statius
Publius Papinius Statius
Statius
(/ˈsteɪʃiəs/; c. 45 – c. 96 AD) was a Roman poet of the 1st century AD (Silver Age of Latin literature). His surviving Latin poetry includes an epic in twelve books, the Thebaid; a collection of occasional poetry, the Silvae; and an unfinished epic, the Achilleid. He is also known for his appearance as a guide in the Purgatory section of Dante's epic poem, the Divine Comedy.Contents1 Life1.1 Family background 1.2 Birth and career 1.3 Later years at Naples2 Works2.1 The Thebaid 2.2 The Silvae 2.3 The Achilleid3 Statius' influence and literary afterlife 4 Notes 5 References5.1 Editions 5.2 Studies6 External linksLife[edit] Family background[edit] Information about Statius' life is almost entirely drawn from his Silvae
Silvae
and a mention by the satirist Juvenal
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Marcus Manilius
Marcus Manilius (fl. 1st century AD) was a Roman poet, astrologer, and author of a poem in five books called Astronomica.Contents1 The Astronomica1.1 Quotations2 References 3 Editions 4 Studies 5 External linksThe Astronomica[edit] Main article: Astronomica (Manilius) The author of Astronomica is neither quoted nor mentioned by any ancient writer. Even his name is uncertain, but it was probably Marcus Manilius; in the earlier books the author is anonymous, the later give Manilius, Manlius, Mallius. The poem itself implies that the writer lived under Augustus
Augustus
or Tiberius, and that he was a citizen of and resident in Rome. According to the early 18th century classicist Richard Bentley, he was an Asiatic Greek; according to the 19th-century classicist Fridericus Jacob, an African
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Samothrace
Samothrace
Samothrace
(also Samothraki, Samothracia[3]) (Ancient Greek: Σαμοθρᾴκη, Ionic Σαμοθρηΐκη; Greek: Σαμοθράκη, [samoˈθraci]) is a Greek island in the northern Aegean Sea. It is a municipality within the Evros regional unit of Thrace. The island is 17 km (11 mi) long and is 178 km2 (69 sq mi) in size and has a population of 2,859 (2011 census). Its main industries are fishing and tourism. Resources on the island include granite and basalt. Samothrace
Samothrace
is one of the most rugged Greek islands, with Mt
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