HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

Coefficients (dining Club)
The Coefficients was a monthly dining club founded in 1902 by the Fabian campaigners Sidney and Beatrice Webb
Beatrice Webb
as a forum for British socialist reformers and imperialists of the Edwardian era.[1] The name of the dining club was a reflection of the group's focus on "efficiency".[2] Membership[edit] The Webbs proposed that the club's membership reflect the entire gamut of political beliefs, and "proposed to collect politicians from each of the parties"
[...More...]

"Coefficients (dining Club)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

British Military
The British Armed Forces,[nb 3] also known as Her Majesty's Armed Forces or the Armed Forces of the Crown, are the military services responsible for the defence of the United Kingdom, its overseas territories and the Crown dependencies. They also promote Britain's wider interests, support international peacekeeping efforts and provide humanitarian aid.[7] Since the formation of a Kingdom of Great Britain
Kingdom of Great Britain
in 1707 (later succeeded by the United Kingdom),[8] the armed forces have seen action in a number of major wars involving the world's great powers, including the Seven Years' War, the Napoleonic Wars, the Crimean War, the First World War, and the Second World War
[...More...]

"British Military" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

New Zealand
New Zealand
New Zealand
(/njuːˈziːlənd/ ( listen); Māori: Aotearoa [aɔˈtɛaɾɔa]) is an island country in the southwestern Pacific Ocean. The country geographically comprises two main landmasses—the North Island
North Island
(Te Ika-a-Māui), and the South Island
South Island
(Te Waipounamu)—and around 600 smaller islands. New Zealand
New Zealand
is situated some 1,500 kilometres (900 mi) east of Australia
Australia
across the Tasman Sea
Tasman Sea
and roughly 1,000 kilometres (600 mi) south of the Pacific island areas of New Caledonia, Fiji, and Tonga. Because of its remoteness, it was one of the last lands to be settled by humans. During its long period of isolation, New Zealand
New Zealand
developed a distinct biodiversity of animal, fungal and plant life
[...More...]

"New Zealand" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Member Of Parliament
A member of parliament (MP) is the representative of the voters to a parliament. In many countries with bicameral parliaments, this category includes specifically members of the lower house, as upper houses often have a different title
[...More...]

"Member Of Parliament" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Entente Cordiale
The Entente Cordiale
Entente Cordiale
(French pronunciation: ​[ɑ̃tɑ̃t kɔʁdjal]) was a series of agreements signed on 8 April 1904 between the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland
[...More...]

"Entente Cordiale" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Tariff Reform League
The Tariff Reform League
Tariff Reform League
(TRL) was a protectionist British pressure group formed in 1903 to protest against what they considered to be unfair foreign imports and to advocate Imperial Preference to protect British industry from foreign competition. It was well funded and included politicians, intellectuals and businessmen, and was popular with the grassroots of the Conservative Party. It was internally opposed by the Unionist Free Food League
Unionist Free Food League
(later Unionist Free Trade Club) but that had virtually disappeared as a viable force by 1910. By 1914 the Tariff Reform League
Tariff Reform League
had approximately 250,000 members.[1] It is associated with the national campaign of Joseph Chamberlain, the most outspoken and charismatic supporter of Tariff Reform
[...More...]

"Tariff Reform League" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Halford John Mackinder
Mackinder may refer to: Halford Mackinder
Halford Mackinder
(1861–1947), English geographer William Mackinder (1880–1930), British Labour Party politicianThis page lists people with the surname Mackinder
[...More...]

"Halford John Mackinder" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Joseph Chamberlain
Joseph Chamberlain
Joseph Chamberlain
(8 July 1836 – 2 July 1914) was a British statesman who was first a radical Liberal, then, after opposing home rule for Ireland, a Liberal Unionist, and eventually served as a leading imperialist in coalition with the Conservatives. He split both major British parties in the course of his career. Chamberlain made his career in Birmingham, first as a manufacturer of screws and then as a notable mayor of the city. He was a radical Liberal Party member and an opponent of the Elementary Education Act 1870. As a self-made businessman, he had never attended university and had contempt for the aristocracy. He entered the House of Commons at 39 years of age, relatively late in life compared to politicians from more privileged backgrounds. Rising to power through his influence with the Liberal grassroots organisation, he served as President of the Board of Trade in Gladstone's Second Government (1880–85)
[...More...]

"Joseph Chamberlain" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Secretary Of State For The Colonies
The Secretary of State for the Colonies
Secretary of State for the Colonies
or Colonial Secretary was the British Cabinet minister in charge of managing the United Kingdom's various colonial dependencies.Contents1 History 2 List of Secretaries of State for the Colonies2.1 Secretaries of State for the Colonies (1768–1782) 2.2 Secretaries of State for the Colonies (1854–1966)3 Secretaries from the Colonies 4 ReferencesHistory[edit] The position was first created in 1768 to deal with the increasingly troublesome North American colonies, following passage of the Townsend Acts. Previously, colonial responsibilities were held jointly by the Lords of Trade and Plantations and the Secretary of State for the Southern Department,[1] who was responsible for Southern England, Wales, Ireland, the American colonies, and relations with the Catholic and Muslim states of Europe
[...More...]

"Secretary Of State For The Colonies" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

British Library Of Political And Economic Science
The British Library of Political and Economic Science, commonly referred to as "LSE Library", is the main library of the London
London
School of Economics and Political Science (LSE). It is one of the largest libraries in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
devoted to the social sciences.[2] The Library responds to around 6,500 visits from students and staff each day. In addition, it provides a specialist international research collection, serving over 12,000 registered external users each year. It is housed in the Lionel Robbins
Lionel Robbins
Building.Contents1 Location 2 History 3 Collections 4 Redevelopment 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksLocation[edit] The library is located on the London
London
School of Economics (LSE) Campus, near Portugal Street
[...More...]

"British Library Of Political And Economic Science" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
[...More...]

"International Standard Book Number" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

H. G. Wells
Herbert George Wells[3][4] (21 September 1866 – 13 August 1946), usually referred to as H. G. Wells, was an English writer. He was prolific in many genres, writing dozens of novels, short stories, and works of social commentary, satire, biography, and autobiography, including even two books on war games. He is now best remembered for his science fiction novels and is often called a "father of science fiction", along with Jules Verne
Jules Verne
and Hugo Gernsback.[5][6][a] During his own lifetime, however, he was most prominent as a forward-looking, even prophetic social critic who devoted his literary talents to the development of a progressive vision on a global scale. A futurist, he wrote a number of utopian works and foresaw the advent of airplanes, tanks, space travel, nuclear weapons, satellite television and something resembling the World Wide Web.[7] His science fiction imagined time travel, alien invasion, invisibility, and biological engineering
[...More...]

"H. G. Wells" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

National Review (London)
The National Review
National Review
was founded in 1883 by the English writers Alfred Austin and William Courthope. It was launched as a platform for the views of the British Conservative Party, its masthead incorporating a quotation of the former Conservative Prime Minister, Benjamin Disraeli: "What is the Tory Party, unless it represents National feeling?" Under editor Leopold Maxse, the National Review
National Review
took an unfriendly attitude towards Imperial Germany
Imperial Germany
in the years leading up to World War I. The magazine was published by the Cecil Club, which became the United and Cecil Club in 1949. The magazine was renamed the National and English Review in 1950
[...More...]

"National Review (London)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
[...More...]

"Special" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Tories
A Tory
Tory
(/tɔːri/) holds a political philosophy (Toryism) based on a British version of traditionalism and conservatism, which upholds the supremacy of social order as it has evolved throughout history. The Tory
Tory
ethos has been summed up with the phrase "God, King, and Country".[1] Tories generally advocate monarchism, are usually of a high church Anglican religious heritage[2][3] and are opposed to the liberalism of the Whig faction. In Britain, the Tory
Tory
political faction originated with the Cavaliers
Cavaliers
during the English Civil War. It also had exponents in other parts of the former British Empire, such as the Loyalists of British America
British America
who opposed American secession during the American War of Independence
[...More...]

"Tories" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Liberal Imperialists
The Liberal Imperialists were a grouping within the British Liberal Party, the most prominent of whom were R. B. Haldane, H. H. Asquith, Sir Edward Grey and Lord Rosebery.[1] The Liberal Imperialists believed that under the leadership of William Ewart Gladstone the Liberal Party had succumbed to "faddists", sectional interests, and the "Celtic fringe" which prevented it from being a truly national party.[2] Furthermore, the Liberal Party should include people of all classes, along with promoting working-class MPs in the Liberal Party.[3] They also argued that the Liberals had lost the centre vote because the party had distanced itself from "the new Imperial spirit".[4] Instead, they argued for a "clean slate", that the Liberal Party must change if it is to succeed
[...More...]

"Liberal Imperialists" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.