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Code Of Hammurabi
The Code of Hammurabi
Hammurabi
is a well-preserved Babylonian code of law of ancient Mesopotamia, dated back to about 1754 BC (Middle Chronology). It is one of the oldest deciphered writings of significant length in the world. The sixth Babylonian king, Hammurabi, enacted the code, and partial copies exist on a 2.25 metre (7.5 ft) stone stele and consists of 282 laws, with scaled punishments, adjusting "an eye for an eye, a tooth for a tooth" (lex talionis)[1] as graded depending on social status, of slave versus free man or woman.[2] Nearly half of the code deals with matters of contract, establishing, for example, the wages to be paid to an ox driver or a surgeon. Other provisions set the terms of a transaction, establishing the liability of a builder for a house that collapses, for example, or property that is damaged while left in the care of another
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Israel
Coordinates: 31°N 35°E / 31°N 35°E / 31; 35State of Israelמְדִינַת יִשְׂרָאֵל (Hebrew) دَوْلَة إِسْرَائِيل (Arabic)FlagEmblemAnthem: "Hatikvah" (Hebrew for "The Hope")(pre-) 1967 border (Green Line)Capital and largest city Jerusalem
Jerusalem
(limited recognition)[fn 1] 31°47′N 35°13′E / 31.783°N 35.217°E / 31.783; 35.217Official languagesHebrew ArabicEthnic groups (2017)74.7% Jewish
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Achaemenid Empire
The Achaemenid Empire
Empire
(/əˈkiːmənɪd/ c. 550–330 BC), also called the First Persian Empire,[11] was an empire based in Western Asia, founded by Cyrus the Great. Ranging at its greatest extent from the Balkans
Balkans
and Eastern Europe
Eastern Europe
proper in the west to the Indus Valley in the east, it was larger than any previous empire in history, spanning 5.5 million square kilometers. Incorporating various peoples of different origins and faiths, it is notable for its successful model of a centralised, bureaucratic administration (through satraps under the King of Kings), for building infrastructure such as road systems and a postal system, the use of an official language across its territories, and the development of civil services and a large professional army
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Smithsonian Institution
The Smithsonian Institution
Smithsonian Institution
(/smɪθˈsoʊniən/ smith-SOH-nee-ən), established on August 10, 1846 "for the increase and diffusion of knowledge," is a group of museums and research centers administered by the Government of the United States.[1] The institution is named after its founding donor, British scientist James Smithson.[2] Originally organized as the "United States National Museum," that name ceased to exist as an administrative entity in 1967.[3] Termed "the nation's attic"[4] for its eclectic holdings of 154 million items,[2] the Institution's nineteen museums, nine research centers, and zoo include historical and architectural landmarks, mostly located in the District of Columbia.[5] Additional facilities are located in Arizona, Maryland, Massachusetts, New York City, Pittsburgh, Texas, Virginia, and Panama
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Anu
Anu
Anu
(Akkadian: 𒀭𒀭 DAN, Anu‹m› or Ilu[2]) or An (Sumerian: 𒀭 AN, from 𒀭 an "Sky, Heaven")[3] is the divine personification of the sky, supreme God, and ancestor of all the deities in ancient Mesopotamian religion. Anu
Anu
was believed to be the supreme source of all authority, for the other gods and for all mortal rulers, and he is described in one text as the one "who contains the entire universe". He is identified with the north ecliptic pole centered in the constellation Draco and, along with his sons Enlil
Enlil
and Enki, constitutes the highest divine triad personifying the three bands of constellations of the vault of the sky
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Bel (mythology)
Bel (/ˈbeɪl/; from Akkadian bēlu), signifying "lord" or "master", is a title rather than a genuine name, applied to various gods in the Mesopotamian religion
Mesopotamian religion
of Akkad, Assyria
Assyria
and Babylonia. The feminine form is Belit 'Lady, Mistress'. Bel is represented in Greek as Belos and in Latin
Latin
as Belus. Linguistically Bel is an East Semitic form cognate with Northwest Semitic
Northwest Semitic
Baal
Baal
with the same meaning. Early translators of Akkadian believed that the ideogram for the god called in Sumerian Enlil
Enlil
was to be read as Bel in Akkadian
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Shamash
Utu[a] later worshipped by East Semitic peoples as Shamash,[b] was the ancient Mesopotamian god of the sun, justice, morality, and truth, and the twin brother of the goddess Inanna, the Queen of Heaven. His main temples were in the cities of Sippar
Sippar
and Larsa. He was believed to ride through the heavens in his sun chariot and see all things that happened in the day. He was the enforcer of divine justice and was thought to aid those in distress
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Khuzestan Province
Khuzestan Province
Khuzestan Province
(Persian: استان خوزستان‎, Ostān-e Khūzestān) is one of the 31 provinces of Iran. It is in the southwest of the country, bordering Iraq
Iraq
and the Persian Gulf. Its capital is Ahvaz
Ahvaz
and it covers an area of 63,238 km2. Other major cities include, Abadan, Khorramshahr, Dezful, Andimeshk, Shush, Shushtar, Behbahan, Bandar-e Emam Khomeyni, Omidiyeh, Izeh, Baq-e-Malek, Bandar-e Mahshahr, Susangerd, Ramhormoz, Shadegan, Masjed Soleyman & Hoveyzeh
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Cyrus The Great
Persian revoltBattle of Hyrba Battle of the Persian BorderInvasion of AnatoliaBattle of Pteria Battle of Thymbra Siege of SardisInvasion of BabyloniaBattle of Opis Siege of Babylon Cyrus II of Persia
Persia
(Old Persian: 𐎤𐎢𐎽𐎢𐏁 Kūruš;[4] New Persian: کوروش Kuruš; Hebrew: כֹּרֶשׁ‬‬, Modern Kōréš, Tiberian Kōréš; c. 600 – 530 BC),[5] commonly known as Cyrus the Great [6] and also called Cyrus the Elder by the Greeks, was the founder of the Achaemenid
Achaemenid
Empire, the first Persian Empire.[7] Under his rule, the empire embraced all the previous civilized states of the ancient Near East,[7] expanded vastly and eventually conquered most of Southwest Asia and much of Central Asia
Central Asia
and the Caucasus
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Jacques De Morgan
Jean- Jacques de Morgan
Jacques de Morgan
(3 June 1857, Huisseau-sur-Cosson, Loir-et-Cher – 14 June 1924) [1] was a French mining engineer,[2] geologist, and archaeologist. He was the director of antiquities in Egypt during the 19th century,[3] and excavated in Memphis and Dashur, providing many drawings of many Egyptian pyramids. He also worked at Stonehenge, and Persepolis, and many other sites. He also went to Russian Armenia, as manager of a copper mine at Akhtala
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National Museum Of Iran
The National Museum of Iran
Iran
(Persian: موزهٔ ملی ایران‎ Mūze-ye Melli-ye Irān) is located in Tehran, Iran
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Isin
Isin
Isin
(Sumerian: 𒉌𒋛𒅔𒆠 I3-si-inki,[1] modern Arabic: Ishan al-Bahriyat) is an archaeological site in Al-Qādisiyyah Governorate, Iraq
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Presumption Of Innocence
The presumption of innocence, sometimes referred to by the Latin expression ei incumbit probatio qui dicit, non qui negat (the burden of proof is on the one who declares, not on one who denies), is the principle that one is considered innocent unless proven guilty. In many states, presumption of innocence is a legal right of the accused in a criminal trial, and it is an international human right under the UN's Universal Declaration of Human Rights, Article 11. Under the presumption of innocence, the legal burden of proof is thus on the prosecution, which must collect and present compelling evidence to the trier of fact. The trier of fact (a judge or a jury) is thus restrained and ordered by law to consider only actual evidence and testimony presented in court. The prosecution must, in most cases prove that the accused is guilty beyond reasonable doubt
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Evidence
Evidence, broadly construed, is anything presented in support of an assertion.[1] This support may be strong or weak. The strongest type of evidence is that which provides direct proof of the truth of an assertion. At the other extreme is evidence that is merely consistent with an assertion but does not rule out other, contradictory assertions, as in circumstantial evidence. In law, rules of evidence govern the types of evidence that are admissible in a legal proceeding. Types of legal evidence include testimony, documentary evidence,[2] and physical evidence.[3] The parts of a legal case which are not in controversy are known, in general, as the "facts of the case." Beyond any facts that are undisputed, a judge or jury is usually tasked with being a trier of fact for the other issues of a case. Evidence
Evidence
and rules are used to decide questions of fact that are disputed, some of which may be determined by the legal burden of proof relevant to the case
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Istanbul Archaeological Museums
The Istanbul
Istanbul
Archaeology Museums (Turkish: İstanbul
İstanbul
Arkeoloji Müzeleri) is a group of three archeological museums located in the
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Istanbul Archaeology Museums
The Istanbul
Istanbul
Archaeology Museums (Turkish: İstanbul
İstanbul
Arkeoloji Müzeleri) is a group of three archeological museums located in the
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