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Coatham
COATHAM is a place in the borough of Redcar and Cleveland
Redcar and Cleveland
and the ceremonial county of North Yorkshire
North Yorkshire
, England
England
and is now a district of Redcar. CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 Landmarks * 3 Future development * 4 Notable residents * 5 References * 6 External links HISTORY Coatham
Coatham
began as a market village in the 14th century to the smaller adjacent fishing port of Redcar
Redcar
but as their populations grew from the 1850s, the dividing space narrowed. Though Coatham
Coatham
is now only a mile-wide district in the town of Redcar, the need for definition was strong enough to warrant the western boundary being marked by a fence which ran the length of West Dyke Road and West Terrace
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Fence
A FENCE is a structure that encloses an area, typically outdoors, and is usually constructed from posts that are connected by boards, wire, rails or netting. A fence differs from a wall in not having a solid foundation along its whole length. Alternatives to fencing include a ditch (sometimes filled with water , forming a moat ). CONTENTS* 1 Types * 1.1 By function * 1.2 By construction * 2 Requirement of use * 3 Legal issues * 3.1 History * 3.2 United Kingdom
United Kingdom
* 3.3 United States
United States
* 4 Cultural value of fences * 5 See also * 6 Notes * 7 References * 8 External links TYPES Typical agricultural barbed wire fencing. Split-rail fencing common in timber-rich areas. A chain-link wire fence surrounding a field. Portable metal fences around a construction site
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Coast
A COASTLINE or a SEASHORE is the area where land meets the sea or ocean , or a line that forms the boundary between the land and the ocean or a lake . A precise line that can be called a coastline cannot be determined due to the Coastline paradox . The term coastal zone is a region where interaction of the sea and land processes occurs. Both the terms coast and coastal are often used to describe a geographic location or region; for example, New Zealand's West Coast
Coast
, or the East and West Coasts of the United States . Edinburgh for example is a city on the coast of Scotland. A pelagic coast refers to a coast which fronts the open ocean, as opposed to a more sheltered coast in a gulf or bay
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Rail Tracks
The TRACK on a railway or railroad , also known as the PERMANENT WAY, is the structure consisting of the rails, fasteners, railroad ties (sleepers, British English) and ballast (or slab track), plus the underlying subgrade . It enables trains to move by providing a dependable surface for their wheels to roll upon. For clarity it is often referred to as RAILWAY TRACK (British English and UIC terminology ) or RAILROAD TRACK (predominantly in the United States). Tracks where electric trains or electric trams run are equipped with an electrification system such as an overhead electrical power line or an additional electrified rail . The term permanent way also refers to the track in addition to lineside structures such as fences
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Grammar School
A GRAMMAR SCHOOL is one of several different types of school in the history of education in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and other English-speaking countries, originally a school teaching Latin
Latin
, but more recently an academically-oriented secondary school , differentiated in recent years from less academic Secondary Modern Schools . The original purpose of medieval grammar schools was the teaching of Latin. Over time the curriculum was broadened, first to include Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
, and later English and other European languages , natural sciences , mathematics , history , geography , and other subjects. In the late Victorian era
Victorian era
grammar schools were reorganised to provide secondary education throughout England and Wales; Scotland had developed a different system
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Ceremonial County
The CEREMONIAL COUNTIES, also referred to as the LIEUTENANCY AREAS OF ENGLAND, are areas of England
England
to which a Lord Lieutenant is appointed. Legally the areas in England, as well as in Wales and Scotland, are defined by the Lieutenancies Act 1997 as COUNTIES AND AREAS FOR THE PURPOSES OF THE LIEUTENANCIES IN GREAT BRITAIN, in contrast to the areas used for local government . They are also informally known as GEOGRAPHIC COUNTIES, as often representing more permanent features of English geography, and to distinguish them from counties of England
England
which have a present-day administrative function
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Geographic Coordinate System
A GEOGRAPHIC COORDINATE SYSTEM is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position , and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position . A common choice of coordinates is latitude , longitude and elevation . To specify a location on a two-dimensional map requires a map projection
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North East England (European Parliament Constituency)
NORTH EAST ENGLAND is a constituency of the European Parliament
European Parliament
. It currently elects 3 MEPs using the d\'Hondt method of party-list proportional representation . CONTENTS * 1 Boundaries * 2 History * 3 Returned members * 4 Election results * 4.1 2014 * 4.2 2009 * 4.3 2004 * 4.4 1999 * 5 References BOUNDARIESThe constituency corresponds to the North East England
England
region of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
, comprising the ceremonial counties of Northumberland , Tyne and Wear
Tyne and Wear
, County Durham
County Durham
and parts of North Yorkshire
North Yorkshire
. HISTORYThe constituency was formed as a result of the European Parliamentary Elections Act 1999 , replacing a number of single-member constituencies
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List Of United Kingdom Locations
A gazetteer of place names in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
showing each place's county , unitary authority or council area and its geographical coordinates
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List Of Places In Yorkshire
This is a list of cities , towns , villages and hamlets in the counties of the EAST RIDING OF YORKSHIRE , NORTH YORKSHIRE , SOUTH YORKSHIRE and WEST YORKSHIRE . See List of civil parishes in the East Riding of Yorkshire
East Riding of Yorkshire
, List of civil parishes in North Yorkshire
North Yorkshire
, List of civil parishes in South Yorkshire
Yorkshire
, List of civil parishes in West Yorkshire
West Yorkshire
for more detailed lists of civil parishes
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Victorian Architecture
VICTORIAN ARCHITECTURE is a series of architectural revival styles in the mid-to-late 19th century. Victorian refers to the reign of Queen Victoria (1837–1901), called the Victorian era , during which period the styles known as Victorian were used in construction. However, many elements of what is typically termed "Victorian" architecture did not become popular until later in Victoria's reign. The styles often included interpretations and eclectic revivals of historic styles mixed with the introduction of Middle Eastern and Asian influences. The name represents the British and French custom of naming architectural styles for a reigning monarch. Within this naming and classification scheme, it follows Georgian architecture and later Regency architecture , and was succeeded by Edwardian architecture
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Boating
BOATING is the leisurely activity of travelling by boat , or the recreational use of a boat whether powerboats , sailboats , or man-powered vessels (such as rowing and paddle boats), focused on the travel itself, as well as sports activities, such as fishing or waterskiing . It is a popular activity, and there are millions of boaters worldwide. CONTENTS * 1 Types of boats * 2 Boating
Boating
activities * 3 Anchoring * 4 Boat
Boat
storage * 5 Safety * 5.1 PFD use * 5.2 Drowning * 5.3 Carbon monoxide * 6 Licensing * 7 See also * 8 References * 9 External links TYPES OF BOATS Boating
Boating
on the Royal Military Canal at Hythe Recreational boats (sometimes called pleasure craft , especially for less sporting activities) fall into several broad categories, and additional subcategories
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Golf
GOLF is a club and ball sport in which players use various clubs to hit balls into a series of holes on a course in as few strokes as possible. Golf, unlike most ball games , cannot and does not utilize a standardized playing area, and coping with the varied terrains encountered on different courses is a key part of the game. The game at the highest level is played on a course with an arranged progression of 18 holes, though recreational courses can be smaller, usually 9 holes. Each hole on the course must contain a tee box to start from, and a putting green containing the actual hole or cup (4.25 inches in diameter). There are other standard forms of terrain in between, such as the fairway, rough (long grass), sand traps (or "bunkers"), and various hazards (water, rocks, fescue) but each hole on a course is unique in its specific layout and arrangement
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Whitbread Prize
The COSTA BOOK AWARDS are a set of annual literary awards recognising English-language books by writers based in Britain and Ireland . They were inaugurated for 1971 publications and known as the WHITBREAD BOOK AWARDS until 2006 when Costa Coffee , a subsidiary of Whitbread , took over sponsorship. The companion COSTA SHORT STORY AWARD was established in 2012. The awards are given both for high literary merit but also for works that are enjoyable reading and whose aim is to convey the enjoyment of reading to the widest possible audience. As such, they are a more populist literary prize than the Booker Prize . In 1989, controversy erupted when the judges first awarded the Best Novel prize to Alexander Stuart 's The War Zone , then withdrew the prize prior to the ceremony amid acrimony among the judges, ultimately awarding it to Lindsay Clarke 's The Chymical Wedding
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County Durham
COUNTY DURHAM (/ˈdʌrəm/ , locally /ˈdɜːrəm/ ) is a county in North East England
England
. The county town is Durham , a cathedral city . The largest settlement is Darlington
Darlington
, closely followed by Hartlepool and Stockton-on-Tees
Stockton-on-Tees
. It borders Tyne and Wear to the north east, Northumberland
Northumberland
to the north, Cumbria
Cumbria
to the west and North Yorkshire to the south. Historically , the county included southern Tyne and Wear, including Gateshead
Gateshead
and Sunderland . During the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
the county was an ecclesiastical centre; this was mainly due to the shrine of St Cuthbert being in Durham Cathedral , and the extensive powers granted to the Bishop of Durham as ruler of the County Palatine of Durham
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Unitary Authorities Of England
UNITARY AUTHORITIES OF ENGLAND are local authorities that are responsible for the provision of all local government services within a district. They are constituted under the Local Government Act 1992 , which amended the Local Government Act 1972
Local Government Act 1972
to allow the existence of counties that do not have multiple districts. They typically allow large towns to have separate local authorities from the less urbanised parts of their counties and provide a single authority for small counties where division into districts would be impractical. Unitary authorities do not cover all of England. Most were established during the 1990s and a further tranche were created in 2009 . Unitary authorities have the powers and functions that are elsewhere separately administered by councils of non-metropolitan counties and the non-metropolitan districts within them
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