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Clovis I
Clovis (Latin: Chlodovechus; reconstructed Frankish: *Hlōdowig;[1] c. 466 – 27 November 511)[2] was the first king of the Franks to unite all of the Frankish tribes under one ruler, changing the form of leadership from a group of royal chieftains to rule by a single king and ensuring that the kingship was passed down to his heirs.[3] He is considered to have been the founder of the Merovingian
Merovingian
dynasty, which ruled the Frankish kingdom for the next two centuries. Clovis was the son of Childeric I, a Merovingian
Merovingian
king of the Salian Franks, and Basina, a Thuringian princess. In 481, at the age of fifteen,[4] Clovis succeeded his father
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Latin Language
Latin
Latin
(Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: [ˈlɪŋɡʷa laˈtiːna]) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets, and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in Latium, in the Italian Peninsula.[3] Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became the dominant language, initially in Italy and subsequently throughout the Roman Empire. Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
developed into the Romance languages, such as Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, French, and Romanian. Latin, Greek and French have contributed many words to the English language
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Saint
A saint (also historically known as a hallow) is a person who is recognized as having an exceptional degree of holiness or likeness or closeness to God.[1][2] Depending on the context and denomination, the term also retains its original Christian
Christian
meaning, as any believer who is "in Christ" and in whom Christ
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Gaul
Gaul
Gaul
(Latin: Gallia) was a region of Western Europe
Western Europe
during the Iron Age that was inhabited by Celtic tribes, encompassing present day France, Luxembourg, Belgium, most of Switzerland, Northern Italy, as well as the parts of the Netherlands
Netherlands
and Germany
Germany
on the west bank of the Rhine. It covered an area of 494,000 km2 (191,000 sq mi).[1] According to the testimony of Julius Caesar, Gaul
Gaul
was divided into three parts: Gallia Celtica, Belgica and Aquitania
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Old Frankish
Frankish (reconstructed Frankish: *Frenkisk),[2] Old Franconian or Old Frankish was the West Germanic language
West Germanic language
spoken by the Franks
Franks
between the 4th and 8th century. The language itself is poorly attested, but it gave rise to numerous loanwords in Old French. Old Dutch
Old Dutch
is the term for the Old Franconian dialects that were spoken in the Low Countries, including present-day Belgium, the Netherlands, and Western parts of today's Germany, until about the 12th century when it evolved into Middle Dutch. During the Merovingian period, Frankish had significant influence on the Romance languages
Romance languages
spoken in Gaul. As a result, many modern French words and placenames (including the country name "France") have a Germanic origin
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Aquitania
Gallia
Gallia
Aquitania (Latin pronunciation: [ˈɡalːia akʷiːˈtaːnia][1]), also known as Aquitaine
Aquitaine
or Aquitaine
Aquitaine
Gaul, was a province of the Roman Empire. It lies in present-day southwest France, where it gives its name to the modern region of Aquitaine. It was bordered by the provinces of Gallia
Gallia
Lugdunensis, Gallia Narbonensis, and Hispania Tarraconensis.[2]Contents1 Tribes of Aquitania 2 Gallia
Gallia
Aquitania and Rome 3 Late Roman Empire
Roman Empire
and the Visigoths 4 See also 5 ReferencesTribes of Aquitania[edit] Fourteen Celtic tribes and twenty Aquitanian tribes occupied the northern parts of the Pyrenees
Pyrenees
and, from the country of the Cemmenus to the ocean, bounded by two rivers: the Garumna (Garonne) and the Liger (Loire)
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Germanic Name
Germanic given names are traditionally dithematic; that is, they are formed from two elements, by joining a prefix and a suffix. For example, King Æþelred's name was derived from æþele, for "noble", and ræd, for "counsel". However, there are also from an early time names which seem to be monothematic, consisting only of a single element
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Louis (given Name)
Louis (UK: /ˈluːi/ or US: /ˈluːɪs/; French pronunciation: ​[lwi]) is the French form of the Old Frankish given name Chlodowig (Modern German: Ludwig) and one of two English forms,[1] the other being Lewis (/ˈluːɪs/)
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Dutch Language
 Aruba  Belgium  Curaçao  Netherlands  Sint Maarten  Suriname Benelux European Union South American Union CaricomRegulated by Nederlandse Taalunie (Dutch Language Union)Language codesISO 639-1 nlISO 639-2 dut (B) nld (T)ISO 639-3 nld Dutch/FlemishGlottolog mode1257[4]Linguasphere 52-ACB-aDutch-speaking world (included are areas of daughter-language Afrikaans)Distribution of the Dutch language
Dutch language
and its dialects in Western EuropeThis article contains IPA phonetic symbols. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of Unicode
Unicode
characters
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Frankish Language
Frankish (reconstructed Frankish: *Frenkisk),[2] Old Franconian or Old Frankish was the West Germanic language
West Germanic language
spoken by the Franks
Franks
between the 4th and 8th century. The language itself is poorly attested, but it gave rise to numerous loanwords in Old French. Old Dutch
Old Dutch
is the term for the Old Franconian dialects that were spoken in the Low Countries, including present-day Belgium, the Netherlands, and Western parts of today's Germany, until about the 12th century when it evolved into Middle Dutch. During the Merovingian period, Frankish had significant influence on the Romance languages
Romance languages
spoken in Gaul. As a result, many modern French words and placenames (including the country name "France") have a Germanic origin
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Great Schism Of 1054
The East–West Schism, also called the Great Schism and the Schism of 1054, was the break of communion between what are now the Roman Catholic Church and Eastern Orthodox churches, which has lasted since the 11th century.[1]Contents1 Outline 2 History2.1 Centres of Christianity2.1.1 Claims of the See of Rome 2.1.2 Claims of the See of Constantinople2.2 Council of Nicaea (325) 2.3 First Council of Constantinople (381) 2.4 Chalcedon (451) 2.5 Separation of the West from the Roman Empire 2.6 Decline of three patriarchates 2.7 Council in Trullo (Quinisext, 692) 2.8 Papal supremacy and Pentarchy 2.9 Other points of conflict 2.10 Filioque and primacy issues (867–879) 2.11 Mutual excommunication of 1054 2.12 East and West since 1054 2.13 Fourth Crusade (1204) and other military conflicts 2.14 Second Council of Lyon (1272) 2.15 Council of Ferrara-Florence (1439) 2.16 Fall of Constantinople (1453) and thereafter 2.17 First Vatican Council (1870) 2.18 Nullif
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Dynasty
A dynasty (UK: /ˈdɪnəsti/, US: /ˈdaɪnəsti/) is a sequence of rulers from the same family,[1] usually in the context of a feudal or monarchical system, but sometimes also appearing in elective republics. The dynastic family or lineage may be known as a "house",[2] which may be styled as "royal", "princely", "ducal", "comital", etc., depending upon the chief or present title borne by its members. Historians periodize the histories of many sovereign states, such as Ancient Egypt, the Carolingian Empire
Carolingian Empire
and Imperial China, using a framework of successive dynasties. As such, the term "dynasty" may be used to delimit the era during which the family reigned and to describe events, trends, and artifacts of that period ("a Ming-dynasty vase")
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Lodewijk
Lodewijk (pronounced [ˈloːdəʋɛi̯k]) is the Dutch name for Louis. In specific it may refer to: In literature:Lodewijk Hartog van Banda, Dutch comic strip writer Lodewijk Paul Aalbrecht Boon, Flemish writer Lodewijk van Deyssel, late 19th century Dutch literary critic and a leading member of the Tachtigers Lodewijk Elzevir, 16th century printer and publisher of books and bibles Lodewijk de Koninck, Flemish writer Martin Lodewijk, Dutch comics writer and cartoonistIn other fields:Lodewijk Fluttert (stage name Bakermat), Dutch Dj and producer Lodewijk Asscher, Dutch politician Lodewijk van den Berg, Dutch-American chemical engineer Lodewijk De Raet, Flemish politician Lodewijk Ferdinand Dieben (better known as Lou Bandy), Dutch singer and cabaret conferencier Lodewijk van Gruuthuse (in English known as Lewis de Bruges), Flemish knight and nobleman Edward Lodewijk Van Halen, American guitarist Lodewijk Sigismund Vincent Gustaaf van Heyden (in Russian known as Logi
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Duchy Of Thuringia
The Duchy of Thuringia
Thuringia
was an eastern frontier march of the Merovingian kingdom of Austrasia, established about 631 by King Dagobert I
Dagobert I
after his troops had been defeated by the forces of the Slavic confederation of Samo
Samo
at the Battle of Wogastisburg. It was recreated in the Carolingian Empire
Carolingian Empire
and its dukes appointed by the king until it was absorbed by the Saxon dukes in 908
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Saint-Denis Basilica
Saint Denis
Denis
may refer to:Denis, a Christian saint, patron saint of ParisContents1 Places 2 Surname 3 See alsoPlaces[edit]Seine-Saint-Denis, a department just north of Paris, France Rue Saint- Denis
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Christmas Day
Christmas
Christmas
is an annual festival commemorating the birth of Jesus Christ,[8][9] observed primarily on December 25[4][10][11] as a religious and cultural celebration among billions of people around the world.[2][12][13] A feast central to the Christian
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