HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Closed-loop Controller
Control theory
Control theory
in control systems engineering deals with the control of continuously operating dynamical systems in engineered processes and machines. The objective is to develop a control model for controlling such systems using a control action in an optimum manner without delay or overshoot and ensuring control stability. To do this, a controller with the requisite corrective behaviour is required. This controller monitors the controlled process variable (PV), and compares it with the reference or set point (SP). The difference between actual and desired value of the process variable, called the error signal, or SP-PV error, is applied as feedback to generate a control action to bring the controlled process variable to the same value as the set point. Other aspects which are also studied are controllability and observability
[...More...]

"Closed-loop Controller" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Control (linguistics)
In linguistics, control is a construction in which the understood subject of a given predicate is determined by some expression in context. Stereotypical instances of control involve verbs. A superordinate verb "controls" the arguments of a subordinate, nonfinite verb. Control was intensively studied in the Government and binding framework in the 1980s, and much of the terminology from that era is still used today.[1] In the days of Transformational Grammar, control phenomena were discussed in terms of Equi-NP deletion.[2] Control is often analyzed in terms of a null pronoun called PRO. Control is also related to raising, although there are important differences between control and raising. Most if not all languages have control constructions and these constructions tend to occur frequently.Contents1 Examples 2 Control verbs vs. auxiliary verbs 3 Non-obligatory or optional control 4 Arbitrary control 5 Representing control 6 Control vs
[...More...]

"Control (linguistics)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Irmgard Flügge-Lotz
Irmgard Flügge-Lotz, née Lotz (16 July 1903 – 22 May 1974) was a German-American mathematician, aerospace engineer, and control theorist. She was a pioneer in the development of the theory of discontinuous automatic control, which has found wide application in hysteresis control systems; such applications include guidance systems, electronics, fire-control systems, and temperature regulation
[...More...]

"Irmgard Flügge-Lotz" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Lotka–Volterra Equations
The Lotka–Volterra equations, also known as the predator–prey equations, are a pair of first-order nonlinear differential equations, frequently used to describe the dynamics of biological systems in which two species interact, one as a predator and the other as prey. The populations change through time according to the pair of equations: d x d t = α x − β x y , d y d t = δ x y − γ y , displaystyle begin aligned frac dx dt &=alpha x-beta xy,\ frac dy dt &=
[...More...]

"Lotka–Volterra Equations" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Gene Expression
Gene
Gene
expression is the process by which information from a gene is used in the synthesis of a functional gene product. These products are often proteins, but in non-protein coding genes such as transfer RNA (tRNA) or small nuclear RNA
RNA
(snRNA) genes, the product is a functional RNA. The process of gene expression is used by all known life—eukaryotes (including multicellular organisms), prokaryotes (bacteria and archaea), and utilized by viruses—to generate the macromolecular machinery for life. Several steps in the gene expression process may be modulated, including the transcription, RNA
RNA
splicing, translation, and post-translational modification of a protein. Gene
Gene
regulation gives the cell control over structure and function, and is the basis for cellular differentiation, morphogenesis and the versatility and adaptability of any organism
[...More...]

"Gene Expression" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Production Theory
Production is a process of combining various material inputs and immaterial inputs (plans, know-how) in order to make something for consumption (the output). It is the act of creating output, a good or service which has value and contributes to the utility of individuals.[1] Economic well-being is created in a production process, meaning all economic activities that aim directly or indirectly to satisfy human wants and needs. The degree to which the needs are satisfied is often accepted as a measure of economic well-being. In production there are two features which explain increasing economic well-being. They are improving quality-price-ratio of goods and services and increasing incomes from growing and more efficient market production. The most important forms of production are:market production public production household productionIn order to understand the origin of the economic well-being, we must understand these three production processes
[...More...]

"Production Theory" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Centrifugal Governor
A centrifugal governor is a specific type of governor with a feedback system that controls the speed of an engine by regulating the amount of fuel (or working fluid) admitted, so as to maintain a near-constant speed, irrespective of the load or fuel-supply conditions. It uses the principle of proportional control. It was invented in 1788 by James Watt
James Watt
to control his steam engine where it regulates the admission of steam into the cylinder(s). Its widest use was on steam engines during the Steam Age in the 19th century. It is also found on internal combustion engines and variously fueled turbines, and in some modern striking clocks.Contents1 Operation1.1 Non-gravitational regulation2 History 3 Dynamic systems3.1 As an influence on cybernetics4 See also 5 ReferencesOperation[edit]Cut-away drawing of steam engine speed governor
[...More...]

"Centrifugal Governor" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Boulton & Watt Engine
The Watt steam engine
Watt steam engine
(alternatively known as the Boulton and Watt steam engine) was the first type of steam engine to make use of a separate condenser. It was a vacuum or "atmospheric" engine using steam at a pressure just above atmospheric to create a partial vacuum beneath the piston. The difference between atmospheric pressure above the piston and the partial vacuum below drove the piston down the cylinder. James Watt
James Watt
avoided the use of high pressure steam because of safety concerns.[1] Watt's design became synonymous with steam engines, due in no small part to his business partner, Matthew Boulton. The Watt steam engine, developed sporadically from 1763 to 1775, was an improvement on the design of the 1712 Newcomen steam engine
Newcomen steam engine
and was a key point in the Industrial Revolution
[...More...]

"Boulton & Watt Engine" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Self-oscillation
Self-oscillation
Self-oscillation
is the generation and maintenance of a periodic motion by a source of power that lacks any corresponding periodicity. The oscillator itself controls the phase with which the external power acts on it. Self-oscillators are therefore distinct from forced and parametric resonators, in which the power that sustains the motion must be modulated externally. In linear systems, self-oscillation appears as an instability associated with a negative damping term, which causes small perturbations to grow exponentially in amplitude. This negative damping is due to a positive feedback between the oscillation and the modulation of the external source of power. The amplitude and waveform of steady self-oscillations are determined by the nonlinear characteristics of the system
[...More...]

"Self-oscillation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Edward John Routh
Edward John Routh FRS (/raʊθ/; 20 January 1831 – 7 June 1907), was an English mathematician, noted as the outstanding coach of students preparing for the Mathematical Tripos examination of the University of Cambridge
Cambridge
in its heyday in the middle of the nineteenth century. He also did much to systematise the mathematical theory of mechanics and created several ideas critical to the development of modern control systems theory.Contents1 Biography1.1 Early life 1.2 Mathematics tutor 1.3 Private life 1.4 Honours2 Work2.1 Stability and control3 Works 4 References 5 Further reading5.1 Obituaries 5.2 About Routh6 External linksBiography[edit] Early life[edit] Routh was born of an English father and a French-Canadian mother in Quebec, at that time the British colony of Lower Canada
[...More...]

"Edward John Routh" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Routh–Hurwitz Theorem
In mathematics, the Routh–Hurwitz theorem gives a test to determine whether all roots of a given polynomial lie in the left half-plane. Polynomials with this property are called Hurwitz-stable. The Routh–Hurwitz theorem was proved in 1895, and it was named after Edward John Routh
Edward John Routh
and Adolf Hurwitz.Contents1 Notations 2 Statement 3 Routh–Hurwitz stability criterion 4 References 5 External linksNotations[edit] Let f(z) be a polynomial (with complex coefficients) of degree n with no roots on the imaginary line (i.e. the line Z = ic where i is the imaginary unit and c is a real number)
[...More...]

"Routh–Hurwitz Theorem" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Wright Brothers
Signatures      Orville WrightBorn (1871-08-19)August 19, 1871 Dayton, OhioDied January 30, 1948(1948-01-30) (aged 76) Dayton, OhioEducation 3 years high schoolOccupation Printer/publisher, bicycle retailer/manufacturer, airplane inventor/manufacturer, pilot trainerWilbur WrightBorn (1867-04-16)April 16, 1867 Millville, IndianaDied May 30, 1912(1912-05-30) (aged 45) Dayton, OhioEducation 4 years high schoolOccupation Editor, bicycle retailer/manufacturer, airplane inventor/manufacturer, pilot trainerThe Wright brothers, Orville (August 19, 1871 – January 30, 1948) and Wilbur (April 16, 1867 – May 30, 1912), were two American aviators, engineers, inventors, and aviation pioneers who are generally credited[1][2][3] with inventing, building, and flying the world's first successful airplane
[...More...]

"Wright Brothers" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

World War II
Allied victoryCollapse of Nazi Germany Fall of Japanese and Italian Empires Dissolution of the League of Nations Creation of the United Nations Emergence of the United States
United States
and the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
as superpowers Beginning of the Cold War
Cold War
(more...)ParticipantsAllied Powers Axis PowersCommanders and leadersMain Allied leaders Joseph Stalin Franklin D
[...More...]

"World War II" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Bang–bang Control
In control theory, a bang–bang controller (2 step or on–off controller), also known as a hysteresis controller, is a feedback controller that switches abruptly between two states. These controllers may be realized in terms of any element that provides hysteresis. They are often used to control a plant that accepts a binary input, for example a furnace that is either completely on or completely off. Most common residential thermostats are bang–bang controllers. The Heaviside step function
Heaviside step function
in its discrete form is an example of a bang–bang control signal
[...More...]

"Bang–bang Control" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Navigation
Navigation
Navigation
is a field of study that focuses on the process of monitoring and controlling the movement of a craft or vehicle from one place to another.[1] The field of navigation includes four general categories: land navigation, marine navigation, aeronautic navigation, and space navigation.[2] It is also the term of art used for the specialized knowledge used by navigators to perform navigation tasks
[...More...]

"Navigation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Autopilot
An autopilot is a system used to control the trajectory of an aircraft without constant 'hands-on' control by a human operator being required. Autopilots do not replace human operators, but instead they assist them in controlling the aircraft. This allows them to focus on broader aspects of operations such as monitoring the trajectory, weather and systems.[1] The autopilot system on airplanes is sometimes colloquially referred to as "George".[2]Contents1 First autopilots 2 Modern autopilots2.1 Control Wheel Steering 2.2 Computer
Computer
system details3 Stability augmentation systems 4 Autopilot
Autopilot
for ILS landings 5 Radio-controlled models 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksFirst autopilots[edit] See also: Gyroscopic
Gyroscopic
autopilot In the early days of aviation, aircraft required the continuous attention of a pilot to fly safely
[...More...]

"Autopilot" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.