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Clock Position
A CLOCK POSITION is the relative direction of an object described using the analogy of a 12-hour clock
12-hour clock
to describe angles and directions. One imagines a clock face lying either upright or flat in front of oneself, and identifies the twelve hour markings with the directions in which they point. Using this analogy, 12 o'clock means ahead or above, 3 o'clock means to the right, 6 o'clock means behind or below, and 9 o'clock means to the left. The other eight hours refer to directions that are not directly in line with the four cardinal directions. In aviation , a clock position refers to a horizontal direction; it may be supplemented with the word high or low to describe the vertical direction which is pointed towards your feet. 6 o'clock high means behind and above the horizon , while 12 o'clock low means ahead and below the horizon
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Samvatsara
SAMVATSARA (संवत्सर) is a Sanskrit
Sanskrit
term for a "year" in Vedic literature such as the Rigveda and other ancient texts. In the medieval era literature, a samvatsara refers to the "Jovian year", that is a year based on the relative position of the planet Jupiter, while the solar year is called varsha. A jovian year is not equal to a solar year based on the relative position of earth and sun. A Jovian year is defined in Indian calendars as the time Brihaspati (Jupiter) takes to transit from one constellation to the next relative to its mean motion. There are 60 samvatsara mentioned in the historic Indian calendars, and these are called Brihaspati
Brihaspati
samvatsara chakra. These are not numbered but each has been given a name. Once all 60 samvatsaras are over, the cycle starts over again
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Time
TIME (styled TIME) is an American weekly news magazine published in New York City
New York City
. It was founded in 1923 and originally run by Henry Luce . A European edition ( Time
Time
Europe, formerly known as Time
Time
Atlantic) is published in London and also covers the Middle East, Africa and, since 2003, Latin America. An Asian edition ( Time
Time
Asia) is based in Hong Kong . The South Pacific edition, which covers Australia, New Zealand and the Pacific Islands , is based in Sydney
Sydney
. In December 2008, Time discontinued publishing a Canadian advertiser edition. Time
Time
has the world's largest circulation for a weekly news magazine, and has a readership of 26 million, 20 million of which are based in the United States. In mid-2016, its circulation was 3,032,581, having fallen from 3.3 million in 2012
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Special
SPECIAL or SPECIALS may refer to: CONTENTS * 1 Music * 2 Film and television * 3 Other uses * 4 See also MUSIC * Special (album) , a 1992 album by Vesta Williams * "Special" (Garbage song) , 1998 * "Special" (Mew song) , 2005 * "Special" (Stephen Lynch song) , 2000 * The Specials
The Specials
, a British band * "Special", a song by Violent Femmes on The Blind Leading the Naked * "Special", a song on
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Millennium
A MILLENNIUM (plural MILLENNIA or MILLENNIUMS) is a period equal to 1000 years , also called kiloyears. It derives from the Latin
Latin
mille, thousand, and annus, year. It is often, but not always, related to a particular dating system . Sometimes, it is used specifically for periods of a thousand years that begin at the starting point (initial reference point) of the calendar in consideration (typically the year "1"), or in later years that are whole number multiples of a thousand years after it. The term can also refer to an interval of time beginning on any date. Frequently in the latter case (and sometimes also in the former) it may have religious or theological implications (see millenarianism ). Sometimes in use, such an interval called a "millennium" might be interpreted less precisely, i.e., not always being exactly 1000 years long. It could be, for example, 1050, etc
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Century
A CENTURY (from the Latin
Latin
centum, meaning one hundred; abbreviated C. ) is a period of 100 years . Centuries are numbered ordinally in English and many other languages. For example, "the 17th century" refers to the years from 1601 to 1700. A CENTENARY is a hundredth anniversary or a celebration of this, typically the remembrance of an event which took place a hundred years earlier. Its adjectival form is CENTENNIAL
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Decade
A DECADE is a period of ten years . The word is derived (via French and Latin) from the Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
: δεκάς (/ðɛkˈɑːs/ , transliteration=dekas), which means a group of ten. Other words for spans of years also come from Latin: biennium (2 years), triennium (3 years), quadrennium (4 years), lustrum (5 years), century (100 years), millennium (1000 years). CONTENTS * 1 Distinctions * 2 See also * 3 References * 4 External links DISTINCTIONSAlthough any period of ten years is a decade, a convenient and frequently referenced interval is based on the tens digit of a calendar year, as in using "1960s" to represent the decade from 1960 to 1969
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Far Future In Science Fiction And Popular Culture
The far future , here defined as the time beyond the 10th millennium , has been used as a setting in many works of fiction or popular scientific speculation. CONTENTS * 1 Doctor Who
Doctor Who
* 2 Dune * 3 Foundation series * 4 The Future is Wild * 5 Last and First Men and Star Maker
Star Maker
* 5.1 Last and First Men * 5.2 Star Maker
Star Maker
* 6 "The Last Question" * 7 "The Late Philip J
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International Standard Book Number
The INTERNATIONAL STANDARD BOOK NUMBER (ISBN) is a unique numeric commercial book identifier. An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book , a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007. The method of assigning an ISBN is nation-based and varies from country to country, often depending on how large the publishing industry is within a country. The initial ISBN configuration of recognition was generated in 1967 based upon the 9-digit STANDARD BOOK NUMBERING (SBN) created in 1966. The 10-digit ISBN format was developed by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and was published in 1970 as international standard ISO 2108 (the SBN code can be converted to a ten digit ISBN by prefixing it with a zero)
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System Of Measurement
A SYSTEM OF MEASUREMENT is a collection of units of measurement and rules relating them to each other. Systems of measurement have historically been important, regulated and defined for the purposes of science and commerce . Systems of measurement in modern use include the metric system , the imperial system , and United States
United States
customary units
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Horizon
The HORIZON or SKYLINE is the apparent line that separates earth from sky , the line that divides all visible directions into two categories: those that intersect the Earth's surface, and those that do not. At many locations, the true horizon is obscured by trees, buildings, mountains, etc., and the resulting intersection of earth and sky is called the visible horizon. When looking at a sea from a shore, the part of the sea closest to the horizon is called the offing. The word horizon derives from the Greek "ὁρίζων κύκλος" horizōn kyklos, "separating circle", from the verb ὁρίζω horizō, "to divide", "to separate", and that from "ὅρος" (oros), "boundary, landmark"
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Daylight Saving Time
DAYLIGHT SAVING TIME (abbreviated DST), commonly referred to as DAYLIGHT SAVINGS TIME in speech, and known as SUMMER TIME in some countries, is the practice of advancing clocks during summer months so that evening daylight lasts longer, while sacrificing normal sunrise times. Typically, regions that use daylight saving time adjust clocks forward one hour close to the start of spring and adjust them backward in the autumn to standard time. George Hudson proposed the idea of daylight saving in 1895. The German Empire
German Empire
and Austria-Hungary
Austria-Hungary
organized the first nationwide implementation, starting on April 30, 1916. Many countries have used it at various times since then, particularly since the energy crisis of the 1970s . DST is generally not observed near the equator, where sunrise times do not vary enough to justify it
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Aviation
AVIATION is the practical aspect or art of aeronautics , being the design, development, production, operation and use of aircraft , especially heavier than air aircraft. The word aviation was coined by French writer and former naval officer Gabriel La Landelle in 1863, from the verb avier (synonymous flying), itself derived from the Latin word avis ("bird") and the suffix -ation
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Port And Starboard
PORT and STARBOARD are nautical and aeronautical terms for left and right, respectively. Port is the left-hand side of a vessel or aircraft, facing forward. Starboard is the right-hand side, facing forward. Since port and starboard never change, they are unambiguous references that are not relative to the observer. The term starboard derives from the Old English steorbord, meaning the side on which the ship is steered. Before ships had rudders on their centrelines, they were steered with a steering oar at the stern of the ship and, because more people are right-handed , on the right-hand side of it. The term is cognate with the Old Norse stýri (rudder) and borð (side of a ship). Since the steering oar was on the right side of the boat, it would tie up at wharf on the other side. Hence the left side was called port. Formerly, larboard was used instead of port. This is from Middle-English ladebord and the term lade is related to the modern load
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Week
A WEEK is a time unit equal to seven days . It is the standard time period used for cycles of rest days in most parts of the world, mostly alongside—although not strictly part of—the Gregorian calendar
Gregorian calendar
. The days of the week were named after the classical planets (derived from the astrological system of planetary hours ) in the Roman era
Roman era
. In English, the names are Monday , Tuesday , Wednesday , Thursday
Thursday
, Friday , Saturday and Sunday
Sunday

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Month
A MONTH is a unit of time , used with calendars , which is approximately as long as a natural period related to the motion of the Moon
Moon
; month and Moon
Moon
are cognates . The traditional concept arose with the cycle of moon phases ; such months (lunations ) are synodic months and last approximately 29.53 days . From excavated tally sticks , researchers have deduced that people counted days in relation to the Moon's phases as early as the Paleolithic
Paleolithic
age. Synodic months, based on the Moon's orbital period with respect to the Earth- Sun
Sun
line, are still the basis of many calendars today, and are used to divide the year
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