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Clifton Webb
Webb Parmelee Hollenbeck (November 19, 1889 – October 13, 1966), known professionally as Clifton Webb, was an American actor, dancer, and singer known for his roles in such films as Laura (1944), The Razor's Edge (1946), and Sitting Pretty (1948), all three being Oscar-nominated.[1] He was known for his stage appearances in the plays of Noël Coward, notably Blithe Spirit, as well as appearances on Broadway in a number of very successful musical revues.Contents1 Biography1.1 Early life 1.2 Broadway 1.3 Laura – established as character actor 1.4 Sitting Pretty and stardom2 Personal life2.1 Death3 Complete filmography3.1 Box office ranking4 Stage work 5 Awards and nominations 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksBiography[edit] Early life[edit] Webb was born Webb Parmelee Hollenbeck in Indianapolis, Indiana
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George Gershwin
George Jacob Gershwin (/ˈɡɜːrʃ.wɪn/; September 26, 1898 – July 11, 1937) was an American composer and pianist.[1][2] Gershwin's compositions spanned both popular and classical genres, and his most popular melodies are widely known. Among his best-known works are the orchestral compositions Rhapsody in Blue
Rhapsody in Blue
(1924) and An American in Paris
Paris
(1928), as well as the contemporary opera Porgy and Bess
Porgy and Bess
(1935). Gershwin studied piano under Charles Hambitzer
Charles Hambitzer
and composition with Rubin Goldmark, Henry Cowell
Henry Cowell
and Joseph Brody. He began his career as a song plugger, but soon started composing Broadway theatre
Broadway theatre
works with his brother Ira Gershwin
Ira Gershwin
and Buddy DeSylva
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Mama (TV Series)
Mama is a weekly Maxwell House and Post Cereal-sponsored CBS Television comedy-drama series that ran from July 1, 1949 until March 17, 1957. The series was based on the memoir Mama's Bank Account by Kathryn Forbes, which was also adapted for the John Van Druten play (1944) and the subsequent film I Remember Mama (1948),[2] and told the ongoing story of a loving Norwegian family living in San Francisco in the 1910s through the eyes of the elder daughter, Katrin Hansen (Rosemary Rice). Katrin would be seen looking through the pages of the family album at the start of each episode with the opening narration:This old album makes me remember so many things in the past. San Francisco and the house on Steiner Street where I was born. It brings back memories of my cousins, aunts and uncles; all the boys and girls I grew up with. And I remember my family as we were then. My big brother Nels, my little sister Dagmar, and of course, Papa
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Century Theatre (New York City)
The Century Theatre, originally the New Theatre, was a theatre located at 62nd Street and Central Park West
Central Park West
in New York City. Opened on November 6, 1909, it was noted for its fine architecture but due to poor acoustics and an inconvenient location it was financially unsuccessful. The theatre was demolished in 1931 and replaced by the Century Apartments building.Contents1 History 2 Publications 3 Gallery 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit]New Theatre, 1909The New Theatre was once called "New York's most spectacularly unsuccessful theater" in the WPA Guide to New York City. Envisioned in 1906 by Heinrich Conried, a director of the Metropolitan Opera House, its construction was an attempt to establish a great theatre at New York free of commercialism, one that, broadly speaking, would resemble the Comédie Française
Comédie Française
of Paris
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Maxine Elliott Theatre
WOR Mutual Radio Theatre CBS
CBS
Radio Playhouse No. 5 CBS
CBS
Television Studio No. 44 (Renamed Studio 51)Broadway north from 38th St., New York City, showing the Casino and Knickerbocker Theatres, a sign pointing to Maxine Elliott's Theatre, which is out of view on 39th Street, and a sign advertising the Winter Garden Theatre, which is out of view on 50th Street. All but the Winter Garden are demolished
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Jerome Kern
Jerome David Kern (January 27, 1885 – November 11, 1945) was an American composer of musical theatre and popular music. One of the most important American theatre composers of the early 20th century, he wrote more than 700 songs, used in over 100 stage works, including such classics as "Ol' Man River", "Can't Help Lovin' Dat Man", "A Fine Romance", "Smoke Gets in Your Eyes", "All the Things You Are", "The Way You Look Tonight", "Long Ago (and Far Away)" and "Who?". He collaborated with many of the leading librettists and lyricists of his era, including George Grossmith Jr., Guy Bolton, P. G. Wodehouse, Otto Harbach, Oscar Hammerstein II, Dorothy Fields, Johnny Mercer, Ira Gershwin and E. Y
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Shubert Theatre (Broadway)
The Shubert Theatre is a Broadway theatre
Broadway theatre
located at 225 West 44th Street in Midtown Manhattan, New York City. Designed by architect Henry Beaumont Herts, it was named after Sam S. Shubert, the second oldest of the three brothers of the theatrical producing family. It shares a Venetian Renaissance facade with the adjoining Booth Theatre, which was constructed at the same time, although the two have distinctly different interiors. The two theatres are connected by a private road/sidewalk, "Shubert Alley". It opened on October 2, 1913 with Hamlet, starring Sir John Forbes-Robertson, followed by the October 21, 1913 opening of the George Bernard Shaw play, Caesar and Cleopatra, staged by the Forbes-Robertson Repertory Company.[1] The theatre's longest tenant was A Chorus Line, which ran for 6,137 performances from 1975 to 1990 and set the record for longest running show in Broadway history
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Maxine Elliott's Theatre
WOR Mutual Radio Theatre CBS Radio Playhouse No. 5 CBS Television Studio No. 44 (Renamed Studio 51)Broadway north from 38th St., New York City, showing the Casino and Knickerbocker Theatres, a sign pointing to Maxine Elliott's Theatre, which is out of view on 39th Street, and a sign advertising the Winter Garden Theatre, which is out of view on 50th Street. All but the Winter Garden are demolished
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Casino Theatre (New York, New York)
The Casino Theatre was a Broadway theatre located at 1404 Broadway, at West 39th Street in New York City. Built in 1882, it was a leading presenter of mostly musicals and operettas until it closed in 1930.[1] The theatre was the first in New York to be lit entirely by electricity, popularized the chorus line and introduced white audiences to African-American shows. It originally seated approximately 875 people, however the theatre was enlarged and rebuilt in 1905 after a fire, and then seated 1,300. It hosted a number of long-running comic operas, operettas and musical comedies, including Erminie, Florodora, The Vagabond King and The Desert Song
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Peggy Wood
Mary Margaret "Peggy" Wood (February 9, 1892 – March 18, 1978) was an American actress of stage, film, and television
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Town Topics (musical)
Ned Wayburn's Town Topics was a musical comedy revue that ran at the Century Theatre from 23 September 1915 to 20 November 1915. It was written Harry B. Smith, Thomas J. Gray and Robert B. Smith and composed by Harold Orlob. External links[edit]Town Topics at the Internet Broadway DatabaseThis musical theatre related article is a stub
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Knickerbocker Theatre (Broadway)
The Knickerbocker Theatre, previously known as Abbey's Theatre and Henry Abbey's Theatre, was a Broadway theatre
Broadway theatre
located at 1396 Broadway (West 38th Street) in New York City. It operated from 1893 to 1930. In 1906, the theatre introduced the first moving electrical sign on Broadway to advertise its productions.Contents1 History 2 Notable productions 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] The 1500-seat theatre was designed by the architect firm of J. B. McElfatrick & Co. It opened as Abbey's Theatre, named after Broadway theatre
Broadway theatre
manager and producer Henry Eugene Abbey, on November 8, 1893 with a production of the melodrama The Countess Valeska
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American Red Cross
The American Red Cross
American Red Cross
(ARC), also known as the American National Red Cross,[4] is a humanitarian organization that provides emergency assistance, disaster relief and education in the United States
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Vaudeville
Vaudeville
Vaudeville
(/ˈvɔːdvɪl, -dəvɪl/; French: [vodvil]) is a theatrical genre of variety entertainment. It was especially popular in the United States
United States
and Canada
Canada
from the early 1880s until the early 1930s. A typical vaudeville performance was made up of a series of separate, unrelated acts grouped together on a common bill. Types of acts have included popular and classical musicians, singers, dancers, comedians, trained animals, magicians, strongmen, female and male impersonators, acrobats, illustrated songs, jugglers, one-act plays or scenes from plays, athletes, lecturing celebrities, minstrels, and movies. A vaudeville performer is often referred to as a "vaudevillian". Vaudeville
Vaudeville
developed from many sources, including the concert saloon, minstrelsy, freak shows, dime museums, and literary American burlesque
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Silent Cinema
A silent film is a film with no synchronized recorded sound (and in particular, no spoken dialogue). In silent films for entertainment, dialogue is conveyed by the use of muted gestures and mime in conjunction with title cards, written indications of the plot and key dialogue lines. The idea of combining motion pictures with recorded sound is nearly as old as film itself, but because of the technical challenges involved, the introduction of synchronized dialogue became practical only in the late 1920s in film with the perfection of the Audion amplifier tube
Audion amplifier tube
and the advent of the Vitaphone
Vitaphone
system
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Humphrey Bogart
Humphrey DeForest Bogart (/ˈboʊɡɑːrt/;[1] December 25, 1899 – January 14, 1957)[2][3] was an American screen and stage actor whose performances in 1940s film noir classics such as The Maltese Falcon, Casablanca, and The Big Sleep earned him status as a cultural icon.[4][5][6] Bogart began acting in 1921 after a hitch in the U.S. Navy in World War I and little success in various jobs in finance and the production side of the theater. Gradually he became a regular in Broadway shows in the 1920s and 1930s.[7] When the stock market crash of 1929 reduced the demand for plays, Bogart turned to film. His first great success was as Duke Mantee in The Petrified Forest
The Petrified Forest
(1936), and this led to a period of typecasting as a gangster with films such as Angels with Dirty Faces (1938). Bogart's breakthrough as a leading man came in 1941 with High Sierra and The Maltese Falcon
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