HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Clifford Geertz
University of Chicago Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, New JerseyDoctoral advisor Talcott ParsonsDoctoral students George E
[...More...]

"Clifford Geertz" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

San Francisco
 CaliforniaCSA San Jose–San Francisco–OaklandMetro San Francisco–Oakland–HaywardMission June 29, 1776[1]Incorporated April 15, 1850[2]Founded by José Joaquín Moraga Francisco PalóuNamed for St
[...More...]

"San Francisco" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Environmental Archaeology
Environmental archaeology is a sub-field of archaeology and is the science of reconstructing the relationships between past societies and the environments they lived in.[1][2] The field represents an archaeological-palaeoecological approach to studying the palaeoenvironment through the methods of human palaeoecology. Reconstructing past environments and past peoples' relationships and interactions with the landscapes they inhabited provides archaeologists with insights into the origin and evolution of anthropogenic environments, and prehistoric adaptations and economic practices.[3] Environmental archaeology is commonly divided into three sub-fields:archaeobotany (the study of p
[...More...]

"Environmental Archaeology" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Archaeology
Archaeology, or archeology,[1] is the study of human activity through the recovery and analysis of material culture. The archaeological record consists of artifacts, architecture, biofacts or ecofacts, and cultural landscapes. Archaeology
Archaeology
can be considered both a social science and a branch of the humanities.[2][3] In North America, archaeology is considered a sub-field of anthropology,[4] while in Europe
Europe
archaeology is often viewed as either a discipline in its own right or a sub-field of other disciplines. Archaeologists study human prehistory and history, from the development of the first stone tools at Lomekwi
Lomekwi
in East Africa
Africa
3.3 million years ago up until recent decades. Archaeology
Archaeology
as a field is distinct from the discipline of palaeontology, the study of fossil remains
[...More...]

"Archaeology" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Biological Anthropology
Biological anthropology, also known as physical anthropology, is a scientific discipline concerned with the biological and behavioral aspects of human beings, their related non-human primates and their extinct hominin ancestors.[1] It is a subfield of anthropology that provides a biological perspective to the systematic study of human beings.Contents1 Branches 2 History 3 Notable biological anthropologists 4 See also 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksBranches[edit] As a subfield of anthropology, biological anthropology itself is further divided into several branches
[...More...]

"Biological Anthropology" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Linguistic Anthropology
Linguistic anthropology is the interdisciplinary study of how language influences social life
[...More...]

"Linguistic Anthropology" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Social Anthropology
Social anthropology
Social anthropology
or anthroposociology is the dominant constituent of anthropology throughout the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and Commonwealth and much of Europe ( France
France
in particular[1]), where it is distinguished from cultural anthropology.[2] In the United States, social anthropology is commonly subsumed within cultural anthropology (or under the relatively new designation of sociocultural anthropology).[citation needed] In contrast to cultural anthropology, culture and its continuity (including narratives, rituals, and symbolic behavior associated with them) have been traditionally seen more as the dependent 'variable' (cf. explanandum) by social anthropology, embedded in its historical and social context, including its diversity of positions and perspectives, ambiguities, conflicts, and contradictions of social life, rather than the independent (explanatory) one (cf
[...More...]

"Social Anthropology" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Aerial Archaeology
Aerial archaeology
Aerial archaeology
is the study of archaeological remains by examining them from altitude.Contents1 Details 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksDetails[edit] The advantages of gaining a good aerial view of the ground had been long appreciated by archaeologists as a high viewpoint permits a better appreciation of fine details and their relationships within the wider site context. Early investigators attempted to gain birdseye views of sites using hot air balloons, scaffolds or cameras attached to kites. Following the invention of the aeroplane and the military importance placed on aerial photography during the First and Second World Wars, archaeologists were able to more effectively use the technique to discover and record archaeological sites. Photographs may be taken either vertically, that is from directly overhead, or obliquely, meaning that they are taken at an angle
[...More...]

"Aerial Archaeology" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Aviation Archaeology
Aviation archaeology
Aviation archaeology
is a recognized sub-discipline within archaeology and underwater archaeology as a whole.[1] It is an activity practiced by both enthusiasts and academics in pursuit of finding, documenting, recovering, and preserving sites important in aviation history. For the most part, these sites are aircraft wrecks and crash sites, but also include structures and facilities related to aviation
[...More...]

"Aviation Archaeology" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Battlefield Archaeology
Battlefield archaeology is a sub-discipline of archaeology that began in North America with Dr. Douglas D. Scott's, National Park Service, metal detecting of Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument in 1983. It is not considered distinct from Military archaeology or Recceology
Recceology
(i.e., the recovery of surface finds and non-invasive site surveying). Battlefield archaeology also refers to the specific study of a particular archaeological horizon in which a military action occurred. This may include both 'bounded' battlefields where troop dispositions, numbers and the order of battle are known from textual records, and also from undocumented evidence of conflict. The discipline is distinct from military history in that it seeks to answer different questions, including the experiences of ordinary soldiers in wider political frameworks
[...More...]

"Battlefield Archaeology" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Biblical Archaeology
Outline of Bible-related topics   Bible
Bible
book    Bible
Bible
portalv t e Biblical archaeology
Biblical archaeology
involves the recovery and scientific investigation of the material remains of past cultures that can illuminate the periods and descriptions in the Bible, be they from the Old Testament
Old Testament
(Tanakh) or from the New Testament, as well as the history and cosmogony of the Judeo-Christian religions. The principal location of interest is what is known in the relevant religions as the Holy Land, which from a western perspective is also called the Middle East
[...More...]

"Biblical Archaeology" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Bioarchaeology
The term bioarchaeology was first coined by British archaeologist Grahame Clark
Grahame Clark
in 1972 as a reference to zooarchaeology, or the study of animal bones from archaeological sites. Redefined in 1977 by Jane Buikstra, bioarchaeology in the US now refers to the scientific study of human remains from archaeological sites, a discipline known in other countries as osteoarchaeology or palaeo-osteology. In England and other European countries, the term 'bioarchaeology' is borrowed to cover all biological remains from sites. Bioarchaeology was largely born from the practices of New Archaeology, which developed in the US in the 1970s as a reaction to a mainly cultural-historical approach to understanding the past. Proponents of New Archaeology
New Archaeology
advocated using processual methods to test hypotheses about the interaction between culture and biology, or a biocultural approach
[...More...]

"Bioarchaeology" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Ethnoarchaeology
Ethnoarchaeology is the ethnographic study of peoples for archaeological reasons, usually through the study of the material remains of a society (see David & Kramer 2001). Ethnoarchaeology aids archaeologists in reconstructing ancient lifeways by studying the material and non-material traditions of modern societies. Ethnoarchaeology also aids in the understanding of the way an object was made and the purpose of what it is being used for.[1] Archaeologists can then infer that ancient societies used the same techniques as their modern counterparts given a similar set of environmental circumstances. One good example of ethnoarchaeology is that of Brian Hayden (1987), whose team examined the manufacture of Mesoamerican
Mesoamerican
quern-stones, providing valuable insights into the manufacture of prehistoric quern-stones
[...More...]

"Ethnoarchaeology" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Outline Of Anthropology
The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to anthropology: Anthropology
Anthropology
– study of humanity
[...More...]

"Outline Of Anthropology" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Feminist Archaeology
Feminist archaeology employs a feminist perspective in interpreting past societies. It often focuses on gender, but also considers gender in tandem with other factors, such as sexuality, race, or class. Feminist archaeology has critiqued the uncritical application of modern, Western norms and values to past societies
[...More...]

"Feminist Archaeology" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Forensic Anthropology
Forensic anthropology
Forensic anthropology
is the application of the anatomical science of anthropology and its various subfields, including forensic archaeology and forensic taphonomy,[1] in a legal setting. A forensic anthropologist can assist in the identification of deceased individuals whose remains are decomposed, burned, mutilated or otherwise unrecognizable, as might happen in a plane crash. Forensic anthropologists are also instrumental to the investigation and documentation of genocide and mass graves. Along with forensic pathologists, forensic dentists, and homicide investigators, forensic anthropologists commonly testify in court as expert witnesses. Using physical markers present on a skeleton, a forensic anthropologist can potentially determine a victim's age, sex, stature, and ancestry
[...More...]

"Forensic Anthropology" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.