HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

Cliff Speegle
Clifton M. Speegle (November 4, 1917 – September 5, 1994) was an American football
American football
player, coach, and college athletics administrator. He served as the head football coach at Oklahoma State University–Stillwater from 1955 to 1962, compiling a record of 36–42–3. During his tenure, Oklahoma State was 0–8 in the Bedlam Series, their rivalry game against the Oklahoma Sooners. Speegle was fired in 1962
[...More...]

"Cliff Speegle" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

American Football
American football, referred to as football in the United States and Canada[citation needed] and also known as gridiron,[nb 1] is a team sport played by two teams of eleven players on a rectangular field with goalposts at each end. The offense, which is the team controlling the oval-shaped football, attempts to advance down the field by running with or passing the ball, while the defense, which is the team without control of the ball, aims to stop the offense's advance and aims to take control of the ball for themselves. The offense must advance at least ten yards in four downs, or plays, and otherwise they turn over the football to the defense; if the offense succeeds in advancing ten yards or more, they are given a new set of four downs. Points are primarily scored by advancing the ball into the opposing team's end zone for a touchdown or kicking the ball through the opponent's goalposts for a field goal
[...More...]

"American Football" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

College Football
College football
College football
is American football
American football
played by teams of student athletes fielded by American universities, colleges, and military academies, or Canadian football
Canadian football
played by teams of student athletes fielded by Canadian universities. It was through college football play that American football
American football
rules first gained popularity in the United States. Unlike most other sports in North America, no minor league farm organizations exist in American or Canadian football. Therefore, college football is generally considered to be the second tier of American football
American football
in the United States and Canadian football
Canadian football
in Canada; one step ahead of high school competition, and one step below professional competition
[...More...]

"College Football" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Pro-Football-Reference.com
Pro-Football-Reference.com is a website providing a variety of statistics for American football. It is one of the few sites that provides information on both active and retired players. The site provides statistics for teams dating back to the pre- Super Bowl
Super Bowl
days. It has statistics for quarterbacks, running backs, receivers, kickers, returners, and punters, as well as some defensive statistics, and Pro Bowl rosters. It also has each team's game-by-game results. The website is maintained by Sports Reference
Sports Reference
and Fantasy Sports Ventures maintains a minority stake in the organization.[3] The website has been used as a reliable source of information by publishers such as Bloomberg Businessweek,[4] Forbes[5] the New York Times,[6] and ESPN.[7] The company also publishes similar statistics websites for basketball, baseball, and hockey.[3] References[edit]^ "Pro-football-reference.com Site Info"
[...More...]

"Pro-Football-Reference.com" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

AP Poll
The Associated Press
Associated Press
(AP Poll) provides weekly rankings of the top 25 NCAA teams in one of three Division I college sports: football, men's basketball and women's basketball. The rankings are compiled by polling 65 sportswriters and broadcasters from across the nation.[1] Each voter provides his own ranking of the top 25 teams, and the individual rankings are then combined to produce the national ranking by giving a team 25 points for a first place vote, 24 for a second place vote, and so on down to 1 point for a twenty-fifth place vote. Ballots of the voting members in the AP Poll are made public.[2]Contents1 College football1.1 History 1.2 No. 1 vs. No
[...More...]

"AP Poll" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

1962 College Football Season
During the 20th century, the NCAA had no playoff for the major college football teams in the University Division, later known as Division I-A. The NCAA did recognize a national champion based upon the final results of "wire service" (AP and UPI) polls. The extent of that recognition came in the form of acknowledgment in the annual 'NCAA Football Guide of the "unofficial" national champions. The AP poll in 1962 consisted of the votes of 52 sportswriters, each of whom would give their opinion of the ten best teams. Under a point system of 10 points for first place, 9 for second, etc., the "overall" ranking was determined. Although the rankings were based on the collective opinion of the representative sportswriters, the teams that remained "unbeaten and untied" were generally ranked higher than those that had not. A defeat, even against a strong opponent, tended to cause a team to drop in the rankings, and a team with two or more defeats was unlikely to remain in the Top 10
[...More...]

"1962 College Football Season" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

1961 College Football Season
During the 20th century, the NCAA had no playoff for the major college football teams in the University Division, later known as Division I-A. The NCAA did recognize a national champion based upon the final results of "wire service" (AP and UPI) polls. The extent of that recognition came in the form of acknowledgment in the annual 'NCAA Football Guide of the "unofficial" national champions. The AP poll in 1961 consisted of the votes of 45 sportswriters, each of whom would give their opinion of the ten best teams. Under a point system of 10 points for first place, 9 for second, etc., the "overall" ranking was determined. Although the rankings were based on the collective opinion of the representative sportswriters, the teams that remained "unbeaten and untied" were generally ranked higher than those that had not. A defeat, even against a strong opponent, tended to cause a team to drop in the rankings, and a team with two or more defeats was unlikely to remain in the Top 10
[...More...]

"1961 College Football Season" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

1960 College Football Season
The 1960 NCAA University Division football season marked the last time that the University of Minnesota
University of Minnesota
was a national champion on the gridiron. Murray Warmath's Minnesota Gophers were not in the Top 20 in preseason polling, but received the AP Trophy at the end of the regular season while Ole Miss received the FWAA trophy. During the 20th century, the NCAA had no playoff for the major college football teams in the University Division, later known as Division I-A. The NCAA did recognize a national champion based upon the final results of "wire service" (AP and UPI) polls. The extent of that recognition came in the form of acknowledgment in the annual NCAA Football Guide of the "unofficial" national champions
[...More...]

"1960 College Football Season" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Big Eight Conference
The Big Eight Conference
Big Eight Conference
was a National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA)-affiliated Division I-A
Division I-A
college athletic association that sponsored football. It was formed in January 1907 as the Missouri Valley Intercollegiate Athletic Association (MVIAA)[2] by its charter member schools: the University of Kansas, University of Missouri,[2] University of Nebraska, and Washington University in St. Louis. Additionally, the University of Iowa
University of Iowa
was an original member of the MVIAA, while maintaining joint membership in the Western Conference (now the Big Ten Conference). The conference was dissolved in 1996
[...More...]

"Big Eight Conference" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

1959 College Football Season
The 1959 NCAA University Division football season saw Syracuse University crowned as the national champion by both final polls, the AP writers poll and the UPI coaches polls.[2][3][4][5] A major rule change widened the goal posts from 18 ft 6 in (5.64 m) to 23 ft 4 in (7.11 m). This width remained in effect for 32 seasons, until the 1991 season, when it was returned to 18½ feet. During the 20th century, the NCAA had no playoff for the major college football teams in the University Division, later known as Division I-A. The NCAA did recognize a national champion based upon the final results of "wire service" (AP and UPI) polls. The extent of that recognition came in the form of acknowledgment in the annual NCAA Football Guide of the "unofficial" national champions. The AP poll in 1959 consisted of the votes of as many as 201 sportswriters. Though not all writers voted in every poll, each would give their opinion of the twenty best teams
[...More...]

"1959 College Football Season" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Roosevelt, Oklahoma
Roosevelt is a town in Kiowa County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 248 at the 2010 census, a decline of 11.4 percent from 283 at the 2000 census.[3] The town was named for President Theodore Roosevelt.Contents1 History 2 Geography 3 Demographics 4 Notable people 5 ReferencesHistory[edit] According to the Encyclopedia of Oklahoma
Oklahoma
History and Culture, the present town of Roosevelt was originally planned by Parkersburg Development Company before the opening of the Kiowa, Comanche, and Apache Reservation in 1901. At that time, the town was known as Parkersburg. However, another town by the same name already existed. Thus, the name was changed to Roosevelt by a townsite organizer, Charlie Parker, who had served under Theodore Roosevelt in the Spanish–American War. A post office named Roosevelt was established October 31, 1901
[...More...]

"Roosevelt, Oklahoma" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

1957 College Football Season
The 1957 NCAA University Division football season saw two different national champions. Auburn University was ranked first in the AP writers' poll taken at season's end, while Ohio State University was first in the UPI coaches' poll.[2] Auburn was ineligible for a bowl game, however, having been placed on probation indefinitely by the Southeastern Conference, after having paid two high school players $500 apiece.[3] During the 20th century, the NCAA had no playoff for the major college football teams in the University Division, later known as Division I-A. The NCAA did recognize a national champion based upon the final results of "wire service" (AP and UPI) polls. The extent of that recognition came in the form of acknowledgment in the annual NCAA Football Guide of the "unofficial" national champions. The AP poll in 1957 consisted of the votes of as many as 360 sportswriters. The UPI poll was taken of a panel of 35 coaches
[...More...]

"1957 College Football Season" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

1956 College Football Season
The 1956 NCAA University Division football season saw the University of Oklahoma Sooners finish a third consecutive season unbeaten and untied to again win the national championship. The 1956 season saw the NCAA split member schools into two divisions: larger schools were part of the University Division, later known as NCAA Division I, and smaller schools were placed in the College Division, later split into NCAA Division II
NCAA Division II
and NCAA Division III. During the 20th century, the NCAA had no playoff for the major college football teams in the University Division, later known as Division I-A and now known as Division I FBS. The NCAA did recognize a national champion based upon the final results of "wire service" (AP and UPI) polls. The extent of that recognition came in the form of acknowledgment in the annual NCAA Football Guide of the "unofficial" national champions. The AP poll in 1956 consisted of the votes of as many as 198 sportswriters
[...More...]

"1956 College Football Season" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

1955 College Football Season
The 1955 NCAA football season saw the Oklahoma Sooners win the national championship after going 10-0-0. Although the final poll was taken before the postseason bowl games, Oklahoma played against the nation's other unbeaten and untied (10-0-0) team, the Maryland Terrapins, at the Orange Bowl in Miami, and won 20-6. During the 20th century, the NCAA had no playoff for the college football teams that would later be described as "Division I-A". The NCAA did recognize a national champion based upon the final results of "wire service" (AP and UPI) polls. The extent of that recognition came in the form of acknowledgment in the annual NCAA Football Guide of the "unofficial" national champions. The AP poll in 1955 consisted of the votes of as many as 391 sportswriters.[2] Though not all writers voted in every poll, each would give their opinion of the twenty best teams. Under a point system of 20 points for first place, 19 for second, etc., the "overall" ranking was determined
[...More...]

"1955 College Football Season" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Missouri Valley Conference
The Missouri Valley Conference
Missouri Valley Conference
(also called MVC or simply "The Valley") is the second-oldest collegiate athletic conference in the United States. Currently, its members are located in the midwestern United States. The conference participates in the NCAA's Division I.Contents1 History 2 Member schools2.1 Current members 2.2 Affiliate members 2.3 Former members2.3.1 Former full members 2.3.2 Former affiliate members2.4 Membership timeline3 Commissioners 4 Sports4.1 Men's sponsored sports by school 4.2 Women's sponsored sports by school5 Facilities 6 Basketball tournament champions by year 7 National team titles by institution 8 Men's basketball attendance 9 Football champions by year 10 See also 11 References 12 External linksHistory[edit] The MVC was founded in 1907 as the Missouri Valley Intercollegiate Athletic Association or MVIAA, 12 years after the Big Ten, the only Division I conference that is older
[...More...]

"Missouri Valley Conference" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

University Of Oklahoma
The University of Oklahoma
Oklahoma
(OU) is a coeducational public research university in Norman, Oklahoma. Founded in 1890, it had existed in Oklahoma
Oklahoma
Territory near Indian Territory
Indian Territory
for 17 years before the two became the state of Oklahoma. In Fall 2016 the university had 31,250 students enrolled,[4] most at its main campus in Norman. Employing nearly 3,000 faculty members,[3] the school offers 152 baccalaureate programs, 160 master's programs, 75 doctorate programs, and 20 majors at the first professional level.[6][7] David Lyle Boren, a former U.S. Senator and Oklahoma
Oklahoma
Governor, has served as the university's president since 1994. The school is ranked first among public universities in enrollment of National Merit Scholars and among the top ten in the graduation of Rhodes Scholars.[6] US News & World Report ranks OU in the top 50 (No
[...More...]

"University Of Oklahoma" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.