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Cleobury Mortimer
Cleobury Mortimer
Cleobury Mortimer
is a market town and civil parish in Shropshire, England, which had a population of 3,036 at the 2011 census.[2] One of the smallest towns in Shropshire, it was granted its market charter in 1253.[3] The town is usually referred to simply as Cleobury. Several pronunciations of the town's name are in use. In Cleobury itself "Clib-bree" is commonly used, while in surrounding areas variations such as "Cleb-bree" and "Clee-bree" are used.[citation needed]Contents1 History 2 Geography 3 Governance 4 Landmarks and amenities 5 Brewery 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] The name is believed to derive from the contraction of the Old English clifu meaning a steep place and bury meaning fortified settlement. Mortimer comes from Ranulph de Mortimer of Normandy
Normandy
to whom the land was granted after the Norman conquest
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Ludlow (UK Parliament Constituency)
In modern politics and history, a parliament is a legislative, elected body of government. Generally, a modern parliament has three functions: representing the electorate, making laws, and overseeing the government via hearings and inquiries. The term is similar to the idea of a senate, synod or congress, and is commonly used in countries that are current or former monarchies, a form of government with a monarch as the head. Some contexts restrict the use of the word parliament to parliamentary systems, although it is also used to describe the legislature in some presidential systems (e.g. the French parliament), even where it is not in the official name. Historically, parliaments included various kinds of deliberative, consultative, and judicial assemblies, e.g
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Normandy
Normandy (/ˈnɔːrməndi/; French: Normandie, pronounced [nɔʁmɑ̃di] ( listen), Norman: Normaundie, from Old French Normanz, plural of Normant, originally from the word for "northman" in several Scandinavian languages)[2] is one of the 18 regions of France, roughly corresponding to the historical Duchy of Normandy. Administratively, Normandy is divided into five départements: Calvados, Eure, Manche, Orne, and Seine-Maritime. It covers 30,627 square kilometres (11,825 sq mi),[3] comprising roughly 5% of the territory of metropolitan France. Its population of 3.37 million accounts for around 5% of the population of France. Normans is the name given to the inhabitants of Normandy,[1] and the region is the homeland of the Norman language. The historical region of Normandy comprised the present-day region of Normandy, as well as small areas now part of the départements of Mayenne and Sarthe
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List Of United Kingdom Locations
A gazetteer of place names in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
showing each place's county, unitary authority or council area and its geographical coordinates.A B C D E F G H I, J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X–ZSee also External linksThe United KingdomLocation names beginning with ALocation names beginning with Aa–Ak Location names beginning with Al Location names beginning with Am–Ar Location names beginning with As–AzLocation names beginning with BLocation names beginning with Bab–Bal Location names beginning with Bam
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List Of Places In England
Here is a list of places, divided by ceremonial county of England.Northumberland Durham Lancashire Cheshire Derbs. Notts. Lincolnshire Leics. Staffs. Shropshire Warks. Northants. Norfolk Suffolk Essex Herts. Beds. Bucks. Oxon. Glos. Somerset Wiltshire Berkshire Kent Surrey Hampshire Dorset Devon Cornwall Heref. Worcs. Bristol East Riding of Yorkshire Rutland Cambs. Greater London Tyne & Wear Cumbria North Yorkshire South Yorks. West Yorkshire Greater Manc. Merseyside East Sussex West Sussex Isle of Wight West MidlandsSee also[edit]Toponymy of Great Britain Toponymical list of counties of the United Kingdom List of generic forms in British place names List of places in the United Kingdom Subdivisions of the United Kingdom List of places in Northern Ireland List of places in Scotland List of places in Wales List of cities in the United Kingdom List of towns in Englandv t eList of places in EnglandBedfordshire Berkshire Bristol Buckinghamshire
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William Langland
William Langland (/ˈlæŋlənd/; Latin: Willielmus de Langland; c. 1332 – c. 1386) is the presumed author of a work of Middle English alliterative verse generally known as Piers Plowman, an allegory with a complex variety of religious themes. The poem translated the language and concepts of the cloister into symbols and images that could be understood by a layman.Contents1 Life 2 Attribution 3 See also 4 References 5 Sources 6 External linksLife[edit] Very little is known of Langland himself. It seems that he was born in the West Midlands of England
England
in 1330. The narrator in Piers Plowman receives his first vision while sleeping in the Malvern Hills
Malvern Hills
(between Herefordshire
Herefordshire
and Worcestershire), which suggests some connection to the area
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Market Town
Market town
Market town
or market right is a legal term, originating in the Middle Ages, for a European settlement that has the right to host markets, distinguishing it from a village and city. A town may be correctly described as a "market town" or as having "market rights", even if it no longer holds a market, provided the legal right to do so still exists.Contents1 Brief history 2 Czech Republic 3 German-language area 4 Hungary 5 Norway 6 United Kingdom and Ireland6.1 England
England
and Wales 6.2 Ireland 6.3 Scotland7 In art and literature 8 See also 9 References 10 Further reading 11 External linksBrief history[edit] The primary purpose of a market town is the provision of goods and services to the surrounding locality.[1] Although market towns were known in antiquity, their number increased rapidly from the 12th century
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Market Charter
Market town
Market town
or market right is a legal term, originating in the Middle Ages, for a European settlement that has the right to host markets, distinguishing it from a village and city. A town may be correctly described as a "market town" or as having "market rights", even if it no longer holds a market, provided the legal right to do so still exists.Contents1 Brief history 2 Czech Republic 3 German-language area 4 Hungary 5 Norway 6 United Kingdom and Ireland6.1 England
England
and Wales 6.2 Ireland 6.3 Scotland7 In art and literature 8 See also 9 References 10 Further reading 11 External linksBrief history[edit] The primary purpose of a market town is the provision of goods and services to the surrounding locality.[1] Although market towns were known in antiquity, their number increased rapidly from the 12th century
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Old English
Old English
Old English
(Ænglisc, Anglisc, Englisc), or Anglo-Saxon,[2] is the earliest historical form of the English language, spoken in England and southern and eastern Scotland
Scotland
in the early Middle Ages. It was brought to Great Britain
Great Britain
by Anglo-Saxon settlers probably in the mid-5th century, and the first Old English
Old English
literary works date from the mid-7th century. After the Norman conquest
Norman conquest
of 1066, English was replaced, for a time, as the language of the upper classes by Anglo-Norman, a relative of French
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Ranulph De Mortimer
Ranulph I de Mortimer
Mortimer
(Ralf, Ralph, Raoul de Mortemer) (born before c.1070–died in/after 1104) was a Marcher Lord from the Montgomery lands in the Welsh Marches
Welsh Marches
(border lands between Wales
Wales
and England). In England, he was Lord of Wigmore in Herefordshire. In Normandy, he was the Seigneur of St. Victor-en-Caux. Ranulph was the founder of the English House of Mortimer
Mortimer
of Wigmore. He acquired Wigmore Castle
Wigmore Castle
after William Fitz Osbern's son Roger de Breteuil joined the Revolt of the Earls of 1075
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Norman Conquest
The Norman conquest of England
England
(in Britain, often called the Norman Conquest or the Conquest) was the 11th-century invasion and occupation of England
England
by an army of Norman, Breton, and French soldiers led by Duke William II of Normandy, later styled William the Conqueror. William's claim to the English throne derived from his familial relationship with the childless Anglo-Saxon King Edward the Confessor, who may have encouraged William's hopes for the throne. Edward died in January 1066 and was succeeded by his brother-in-law Harold Godwinson. The Norwegian king Harald Hardrada
Harald Hardrada
invaded northern England
England
in September 1066 and was victorious at the Battle of Fulford, but Harold defeated and killed him at the Battle of Stamford Bridge
Battle of Stamford Bridge
on 25 September. Within days, William landed in southern England
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List Of United Kingdom Parliament Constituencies
There are 650 constituencies in the United Kingdom, each electing a single Member of Parliament to the House of Commons ordinarily every five years. Voting
Voting
last took place in all 650 of those constituencies at the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
general election on 8 June 2017, and these results have been counted and verified. The election on 8 June 2017 elected 650 constituencies. 317 are held by the Conservative Party, 262 are held by the Labour Party, 35 are held by the Scottish National Party, 12 are held by the Liberal Democrats and 10 are held by the Democratic Unionist Party, with the balance held by various smaller parties, none of which have more than 8 seats, plus four unaffiliated MPs
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Marcher Lord
A Marcher Lord (Welsh: Barwn y Mers) was a noble appointed by the King of England to guard the border (known as the Welsh Marches) between England and Wales. A Marcher Lord is the English equivalent of a margrave (in the Holy Roman empire) or a marquis (in France)
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Welsh Marches
The Welsh Marches (Welsh: Y Mers) is an imprecisely defined area along and around the border between England and Wales
Wales
in the United Kingdom. The precise meaning of the term has varied at different periods. Historically, the English term Welsh March (in Medieval Latin Marchia Walliae)[1] was originally used in the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
to denote the marches between England and the Principality of Wales, in which Marcher lords had specific rights, exercised to some extent independently of the king of England
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Middle Ages
In the history of Europe, the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
(or Medieval Period) lasted from the 5th to the 15th century. It began with the fall of the Western Roman Empire
Roman Empire
and merged into the Renaissance
Renaissance
and the Age of Discovery. The Middle Ages
Middle Ages
is the middle period of the three traditional divisions of Western history: classical antiquity, the medieval period, and the modern period. The medieval period is itself subdivided into the Early, High, and Late Middle Ages. Population decline, counterurbanisation, invasion, and movement of peoples, which had begun in Late Antiquity, continued in the Early Middle Ages. The large-scale movements of the Migration Period, including various Germanic peoples, formed new kingdoms in what remained of the Western Roman Empire
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