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Claudius
Claudius
Claudius
(/ˈklɔːdiəs/; Latin: Tiberius
Tiberius
Claudius
Claudius
Caesar Augustus Germanicus;[1][2] 1 August 10 BC – 13 October 54 AD) was Roman emperor from 41 to 54. A member of the Julio-Claudian dynasty, he was the son of Drusus and Antonia Minor. He was born at Lugdunum
Lugdunum
in Gaul, the first (and until Trajan, the only) Roman Emperor
Roman Emperor
to be born outside Italy. Because he was afflicted with a limp and slight deafness due to sickness at a young age, his family ostracized him and excluded him from public office until his consulship, shared with his nephew Caligula
Caligula
in 37. Claudius' infirmity probably saved him from the fate of many other nobles during the purges of Tiberius's and Caligula's reigns; potential enemies did not see him as a serious threat
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Dynasty
A dynasty (UK: /ˈdɪnəsti/, US: /ˈdaɪnəsti/) is a sequence of rulers from the same family,[1] usually in the context of a feudal or monarchical system, but sometimes also appearing in elective republics. The dynastic family or lineage may be known as a "house",[2] which may be styled as "royal", "princely", "ducal", "comital", etc., depending upon the chief or present title borne by its members. Historians periodize the histories of many sovereign states, such as Ancient Egypt, the Carolingian Empire
Carolingian Empire
and Imperial China, using a framework of successive dynasties. As such, the term "dynasty" may be used to delimit the era during which the family reigned and to describe events, trends, and artifacts of that period ("a Ming-dynasty vase")
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Gaul
Gaul
Gaul
(Latin: Gallia) was a region of Western Europe
Western Europe
during the Iron Age that was inhabited by Celtic tribes, encompassing present day France, Luxembourg, Belgium, most of Switzerland, Northern Italy, as well as the parts of the Netherlands
Netherlands
and Germany
Germany
on the west bank of the Rhine. It covered an area of 494,000 km2 (191,000 sq mi).[1] According to the testimony of Julius Caesar, Gaul
Gaul
was divided into three parts: Gallia Celtica, Belgica and Aquitania
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Year Of The Four Emperors
The Year of the Four Emperors, 69 AD, was a year in the history of the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
in which four emperors ruled in succession: Galba, Otho, Vitellius, and Vespasian. The suicide of the emperor Nero
Nero
in 68 was followed by a brief period of civil war, the first Roman civil war since Mark Antony's death in 30 BC. Between June of 68 and December of 69 Galba, Otho, and Vitellius
Vitellius
successively rose and fell before the July 69 accession of Vespasian, who founded the Flavian dynasty
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Roman Republic
The Roman Republic
Republic
(Latin: Res publica Romana; Classical Latin: [ˈreːs ˈpuːb.lɪ.ka roːˈmaː.na]) was the era of classical Roman civilization beginning with the overthrow of the Roman Kingdom, traditionally dated to 509 BC, and ending in 27 BC with the establishment of the Roman Empire. It was during this period that Rome's control expanded from the city's immediate surroundings to hegemony over the entire Mediterranean
Mediterranean
world. Roman government was headed by two consuls, elected annually by the citizens and advised by a senate composed of appointed magistrates. As Roman society was very hierarchical by modern standards, the evolution of the Roman government was heavily influenced by the struggle between the patricians, Rome's land-holding aristocracy, who traced their ancestry to the founding of Rome, and the plebeians, the far more numerous citizen-commoners
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Julia Antonia
Julia
Julia
is usually a woman's given name. It is a Latinate feminine form of the name Julio and Julius. Julius
Julius
was a Roman family, derived from a founder Julus, the son of Aeneas
Aeneas
and Creusa in Roman mythology, although the name's etymology may possibly derive from Greek ἴουλος (ioulos) "downy-[haired, bearded]"[citation needed] or alternatively from the name of the Roman god Jupiter.[citation needed] Like its male counterpart, the given name Julia
Julia
had been in use throughout Late Antiquity
Late Antiquity
(e.g. Julia
Julia
of Corsica) but became rare during the Middle Ages, and was revived only with the Italian Renaissance. It became common in the English-speaking world only in the 18th century
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Julia Minor (sister Of Caesar)
Julia, also known as Julia Minor and Julia the Younger, (101–51 BC) was the second of two daughters of Gaius Julius Caesar
Julius Caesar
and Aurelia Cotta. She is best known as the sister of the dictator Gaius Julius Caesar, and the maternal grandmother of Augustus.Contents1 Siblings 2 Marriage and offspring 3 Death 4 Sources 5 Footnotes 6 ReferencesSiblings[edit] Julia and her siblings were born and raised at Rome. Because Roman daughters typically received praenomina only if they had several elder sisters, the elder sister came to be known as "Julia Major", and the younger as "Julia Minor", when it was necessary to distinguish between them.[i] It is not known if it was the elder or the younger of the dictator's sisters who gave evidence against Publius Clodius Pulcher when he was impeached for impiety in 61 BC. Julia and her mother gave the legal courts a detailed account of the affair he had with Pompeia, Julius Caesar's wife
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Latin Language
Latin
Latin
(Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: [ˈlɪŋɡʷa laˈtiːna]) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in the area around Rome, known as Latium.[4] Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became the dominant language in Italy, and subsequently throughout the western Roman Empire. Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
developed into the Romance languages, such as Italian, French, Portuguese, Romanian, and Spanish. Latin, Greek and French have contributed many words to the English language
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Naples National Archaeological Museum
The National Archaeological Museum of Naples
Naples
(Italian: Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Napoli, sometimes abbreviated to MANN) is an important Italian archaeological museum, particularly for ancient Roman remains. Its collection includes works from Greek, Roman and Renaissance
Renaissance
times, and especially Roman artifacts from nearby Pompeii, Stabiae
Stabiae
and Herculaneum. It was formerly the Real Museo Borbonico ("royal Bourbon museum").Contents1 Building 2 Collections2.1 Marbles 2.2 Bronzes from the Villa of the Papyri 2.3 Mosaics 2.4 Egyptian Collection 2.5 Secret Cabinet3 Gallery 4 References 5 External linksBuilding[edit] The building was built as a cavalry barracks in 1585. From 1616 to 1777 it was the seat of the University of Naples
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Italy (Roman Empire)
Italia was the name of the Italian Peninsula
Italian Peninsula
during the Roman era. It was not a province, but the territory of the city of Rome, thus having a special status.[1] Italy and its borders expanded over time, until Augustus
Augustus
finally organized it as an administrative division consisting of eleven regions (from the Alps
Alps
to the Ionian Sea). The islands of Corsica, Sardinia, Sicily
Sicily
and Malta
Malta
were added to Italy by Diocletian in 292 AD. Roman Italy
Roman Italy
remained united until the sixth century, when it was divided between the Byzantine Empire
Byzantine Empire
and territories of the Germanic peoples
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Roman Senate
The Roman Senate
Senate
(Latin: Senatus Romanus; Italian: Senato Romano) was a political institution in ancient Rome. It was one of the most enduring institutions in Roman history, being established in the first days of the city (traditionally founded in 753 BC). It survived the overthrow of the kings in 509 BC, the fall of the Roman Republic
Roman Republic
in the 1st century BC, the division of the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
in 395 AD, the fall of the Western Roman Empire
Roman Empire
in 476 AD, and the barbarian rule of Rome
Rome
in the 5th, 6th, and 7th centuries. During the days of the kingdom, it was little more than an advisory council to the king
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Italia (Roman Empire)
Italia was the name of the Italian Peninsula
Italian Peninsula
during the Roman era. It was not a province, but the territory of the city of Rome, thus having a special status.[1] Italy and its borders expanded over time, until Augustus
Augustus
finally organized it as an administrative division consisting of eleven regions (from the Alps
Alps
to the Ionian Sea). The islands of Corsica, Sardinia, Sicily
Sicily
and Malta
Malta
were added to Italy by Diocletian in 292 AD. Roman Italy
Roman Italy
remained united until the sixth century, when it was divided between the Byzantine Empire
Byzantine Empire
and territories of the Germanic peoples
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Tiberius (praenomen)
Tiberius
Tiberius
(/taɪˈbɪəriəs/; Latin pronunciation: [tɪˈbɛɾɪ.ʊs]) is a Latin praenomen, or personal name, which was used throughout Roman history. Although not especially common, it was used by both patrician and plebeian families. The feminine form is Tiberia. The name is usually abbreviated Ti., but occasionally Tib.[1] For most of Roman history, Tiberius
Tiberius
was about the twelfth or thirteenth most-common praenomen. It was not used by most families, but was favored by several, including the great patrician houses of the Aemilii, Claudii, and Sempronii
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Roman Consul
A consul held the highest elected political office of the Roman Republic (509 to 27 BC), and ancient Romans considered the consulship the highest level of the cursus honorum (an ascending sequence of public offices to which politicians aspired). Each year, the citizens of Rome
Rome
elected two consuls to serve jointly for a one-year term. The consuls alternated in holding imperium each month, and a consul's imperium extended over Rome, Italy, and the provinces
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Lyon, France
Centre: Parc de la Tête d'Or, Confluence district and the Vieux Lyon. Bottom: Pont Lafayette, Part-Dieu district with the Place Bellecour
Place Bellecour
in foreground during Festival of Lights.FlagCoat of armsMotto(s): Avant, avant, Lion le melhor. (Old Franco-Provençal: Forward, forward, Lyon
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Gaius Octavius (praetor 61 BC)
Gaius Octavius[1] (about 100 – 59 BC) was a Roman politician. He was an ancestor to the Roman Emperors of the Julio-Claudian dynasty. He was the father of the Emperor Augustus, step-grandfather of the Emperor Tiberius, great-grandfather of the Emperor Claudius, great-great grandfather of the Emperor Caligula, and great-great-great grandfather of the Emperor Nero. Hailing from Velitrae, he was a descendant of an old and wealthy equestrian branch of the gens Octavia. Despite being from a wealthy family, his family was plebeian, rather than patrician. As a novus homo ("new man"), he was not of a senatorial family. His grandfather, Gaius Octavius, fought as a military tribune in Sicily during the Second Punic War. His father, Gaius Octavius, was a municipal magistrate who lived to an advanced age.Contents1 Personal life 2 Political career 3 Family tree of the Octavii Rufi 4 See also 5 Footnotes 6 SourcesPersonal life[edit] Octavius' first wife was named Ancharia
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