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Clark County, Washington
Clark County is a county in the southwestern part of the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Washington. As of the 2010 census, the population was 425,363,[1] making it Washington's fifth-most populous county. Its county seat and largest city is Vancouver.[2] It was the first county in Washington, named after William Clark of the Lewis and Clark Expedition
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Ecological Succession
Ecological succession
Ecological succession
is the process of change in the species structure of an ecological community over time. The time scale can be decades (for example, after a wildfire), or even millions of years after a mass extinction.[1] The community begins with relatively few pioneering plants and animals and develops through increasing complexity until it becomes stable or self-perpetuating as a climax community. The "engine" of succession, the cause of ecosystem change, is the impact of established species upon their own environments. A consequence of living is the sometimes subtle and sometimes overt alteration of one's own environment.[2] It is a phenomenon or process by which an ecological community undergoes more or less orderly and predictable changes following a disturbance or the initial colonization of a new habitat
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Pacific Coast Range
The Pacific Coast Ranges
Coast Ranges
(officially gazetted as the Pacific Mountain System[1] in the United States
United States
but referred to as the Pacific Coast Ranges),[2] are the s
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Clark, Washington
Coordinates: 47°55′36″N 118°41′23″W / 47.9268°N 118.6897°W / 47.9268; -118.6897Clark Keller FerryThe Keller FerryCountry United StatesState WashingtonCounty Lincoln CountyNamed for Todd ClarkPopulation • Estimate (2010)[1] 67Time zone Pacific (PST) (UTC-8) • Summer (DST) PDT (UTC-7)ZIP code 99185Area code(s) 509GNIS feature ID 2786072[2]Clark (also known as Keller Ferry) is an unincorporated community at the bottom of the Hellgate Canyon in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Washington. Most buildings in the community are grouped around the Keller Ferry Campground at the south side of the Keller Ferry
Keller Ferry
crossing. There are several businesses, including a car repair shop and a convenience store. The community is located on Lake Roosevelt, just south of the Lake Roosevelt National Recreation Area
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British Columbia
British Columbia
British Columbia
(BC; French: Colombie-Britannique) is the westernmost province of Canada, located between the Pacific Ocean
Pacific Ocean
and the Rocky Mountains. With an estimated population of 4.8 million as of 2017, it is Canada's third-most populous province. The first British settlement in the area was Fort Victoria, established in 1843, which gave rise to the City of Victoria, at first the capital of the separate Colony of Vancouver
Vancouver
Island. Subsequently, on the mainland, the Colony of British Columbia (1858–1866)
Colony of British Columbia (1858–1866)
was founded by Richard Clement Moody[5] and the Royal Engineers, Columbia Detachment, in response to the Fraser Canyon
Fraser Canyon
Gold Rush
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James K. Polk
James Knox Polk (November 2, 1795 – June 15, 1849) was an American politician who served as the 11th President of the United States (1845–1849). He previously was Speaker of the House of Representatives (1835–1839) and Governor of Tennessee
Governor of Tennessee
(1839–1841). A protégé of Andrew Jackson, he was a member of the Democratic Party and an advocate of Jacksonian democracy. During Polk's presidency, the United States expanded significantly with the annexation of the Republic of Texas, the Oregon Territory, and the Mexican Cession following the American victory in the Mexican–American War. After building a successful law practice in Tennessee, Polk was elected to the state legislature (1823) and then to the United States House of Representatives in 1825, becoming a strong supporter of Jackson. After serving as chairman of the Ways and Means Committee, he became Speaker in 1835, the only president to have been Speaker
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U.S. Census Bureau
The United States
United States
Census
Census
Bureau (USCB; officially the Bureau of the Census, as defined in Title 13 U.S.C. § 11) is a principal agency of the U.S. Federal Statistical System, responsible for producing data about the American people and economy. The Census Bureau is part of the U.S. Department of Commerce
Department of Commerce
and its director is appointed by the President of the United States. The Census
Census
Bureau's primary mission is conducting the U.S. Census every ten years, which allocates the seats of the U.S
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Lewis River (Washington)
Lewis
Lewis
(Scottish Gaelic: Leòdhas, pronounced [ʎɔː.əs̪], also Isle of Lewis) is the northern part of Lewis
Lewis
and Harris, the largest island of the Western Isles
Western Isles
or Outer Hebrides
Outer Hebrides
archipelago in Scotland. The total area of Lewis
Lewis
is 683 square miles (1,770 km2).[1] As both parts of the island are frequently referred to as if they were separate islands, Lewis
Lewis
is known as the Isle of Lewis. Lewis
Lewis
is, in general, the lower-lying part of the island: the other part, Harris, is more mountainous. Due to its flatter, more fertile land, Lewis
Lewis
contains three-quarters of the population of the Western Isles, and the largest settlement, Stornoway
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Willamette Valley
The Willamette Valley
Willamette Valley
(/wɪˈlæmɪt/) is a 150-mile (240 km) long valley in the Pacific Northwest
Pacific Northwest
region of the United States. The Willamette River
Willamette River
flows the entire length of the valley, and it is surrounded by mountains on three sides – the Cascade Range
Cascade Range
to the east, the Oregon
Oregon
Coast Range to the west, and the Calapooya Mountains to the south. It forms the cultural and political heart of Oregon, and is home to approximately 70 percent of its population[1] including its six largest cities: Portland, Eugene, Salem, the state capital, and the cities of Gresham, Hillsboro and Beaverton in the Portland metropolitan area
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Volcanic
A volcano is a rupture in the crust of a planetary-mass object, such as Earth, that allows hot lava, volcanic ash, and gases to escape from a magma chamber below the surface. Earth's volcanoes occur because its crust is broken into 17 major, rigid tectonic plates that float on a hotter, softer layer in its mantle.[1] Therefore, on Earth, volcanoes are generally found where tectonic plates are diverging or converging, and most are found underwater. For example, a mid-oceanic ridge, such as the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, has volcanoes caused by divergent tectonic plates whereas the Pacific Ring of Fire
Pacific Ring of Fire
has volcanoes caused by convergent tectonic plates
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Cascade Range
The Cascade Range
Cascade Range
or Cascades is a major mountain range of western North America, extending from southern British Columbia
British Columbia
through Washington and Oregon
Oregon
to Northern California. It includes both non-volcanic mountains, such as the North Cascades, and the notable volcanoes known as the High Cascades. The small part of the range in British Columbia
British Columbia
is referred to as the Canadian Cascades or, locally, as the Cascade Mountains. The latter term is also sometimes used by Washington residents to refer to the Washington section of the Cascades in addition to North Cascades, the more usual U.S. term, as in North Cascades
North Cascades
National Park
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Rocky Mountains
The Rocky Mountains, commonly known as the Rockies, are a major mountain range in western North America. The Rocky Mountains
Rocky Mountains
stretch more than 3,000 miles (4,800 km) from the northernmost part of British Columbia, in western Canada, to New Mexico, in the Southwestern United States. Within the North American Cordillera, the Rockies are somewhat distinct from the Pacific Coast Ranges
Pacific Coast Ranges
and the Cascade Range
Cascade Range
and Sierra Nevada, which all lie further to the west. The Rocky Mountains
Rocky Mountains
were initially formed from 80 million to 55 million years ago during the Laramide orogeny, in which a number of plates began to slide underneath the North American plate. The angle of subduction was shallow, resulting in a broad belt of mountains running down western North America
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Glaciation
A glacial period (alternatively glacial or glaciation) is an interval of time (thousands of years) within an ice age that is marked by colder temperatures and glacier advances. Interglacials, on the other hand, are periods of warmer climate between glacial periods. The last glacial period ended about 15,000 years ago.[1] The Holocene
Holocene
epoch is the current interglacial. A time when there are no glaciers on Earth is considered a greenhouse climate state.[2][3][4]Look up glaciation in Wiktionary, the free dictionary.Contents1 Quaternary ice age 2 Last glacial period 3 Next glacial period 4 See also 5 ReferencesQuaternary ice age[edit] Main articles: Quaternary glaciation
Quaternary glaciation
and timeline of glaciationGlacial and interglacial cycles as represented by atmospheric CO2, measured from ice core samples going back 800,000 years. The stage names are part of the North American and the European Alpine subdivisions
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Andisols
In USDA soil taxonomy, andisols are soils formed in volcanic ash and defined as soils containing high proportions of glass and amorphous colloidal materials, including allophane, imogolite and ferrihydrite.[1] In the FAO soil classification, andisols are known as andosols.[2] Because they are generally quite young, andisols typically are very fertile except in cases where phosphorus is easily fixed (this sometimes occurs in the tropics). They can usually support intensive cropping, with areas used for wet rice in Java
Java
supporting some of the densest populations in the world. Other andisol areas support crops of fruit, maize, tea, coffee or tobacco. In the Pacific Northwest
Pacific Northwest
USA, andisols support very productive forests. Andisols occupy about 1% of the global ice-free land area
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Mollisols
Mollisols are a soil order in USDA soil taxonomy. Mollisols form in semi-arid to semi-humid areas, typically under a grassland cover. They are most commonly found in the mid-latitudes, namely in North America, mostly east of the Rocky Mountains, in South America
South America
in Argentina (Pampas) and Brazil, and in Asia
Asia
in Mongolia
Mongolia
and the Russian Steppes. Their parent material is typically base-rich and calcareous and include limestone, loess, or wind-blown sand. The main processes that lead to the formation of grassland Mollisols are melanisation, decomposition, humification and pedoturbation. Mollisols have deep, high organic matter, nutrient-enriched surface soil (A horizon), typically between 60–80 cm in depth. This fertile surface horizon, known as a mollic epipedon, is the defining diagnostic feature of Mollisols
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Lake Missoula
Lake Missoula
Lake Missoula
was a prehistoric proglacial lake in western Montana that existed periodically at the end of the last ice age between 15,000 and 13,000 years ago. The lake measured about 7,770 square kilometres (3,000 sq mi) and contained about 2,100 cubic kilometres (500 cu mi) of water, half the volume of Lake Michigan.[1] The Glacial Lake Missoula
Glacial Lake Missoula
National Natural Landmark
National Natural Landmark
is located about 110 kilometres (68 mi) northwest of Missoula, Montana, at the north end of the Camas Prairie Valley, just east of Montana
Montana
Highway 382 and Macfarlane Ranch
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