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Claire Trevor
Claire Trevor (born Claire Wemlinger; March 8, 1910 – April 8, 2000) was an American actress. She appeared in over 60 films, winning the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress for her role in Key Largo, and earning nominations for her roles in The High and the Mighty and Dead End
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Brooklyn, New York
Brooklyn (/ˈbrʊklɪn/) is the most populous borough of New York City, with a census-estimated 2,648,771 residents in 2017. It borders the borough of Queens at the southwestern end of the same Long Island, and has several bridge connections to the nearby boroughs of Staten Island and Manhattan. Since 1896, the borough has been coterminous with Kings County, the most populous county in the U.S
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Columbia University
Columbia University (Columbia; officially Columbia University in the City of New York), established in 1754, is a private Ivy League research university in Upper Manhattan, New York City. Columbia contains the oldest college in the state of New York and is the fifth chartered institution of higher learning in the United States, making it one of nine colonial colleges founded prior to the United States Declaration of Independence">Declaration of Independence. It was established as King's College by royal charter of George II of Great Britain and renamed Columbia College in 1784 following the American Revolutionary War. The college has produced numerous distinguished alumni
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Mark Hellinger
Mark Hellinger (March 21, 1903 - December 21, 1947) was an American journalist, theatre columnist and film producer.

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Symbols of Newport Beach
Flower Bougainvillea
Tree Coral tree
Newport Beach is a seaside city in Orange County, California, United States. Its population was 85,287 at the 2010 census
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Lawrence Tierney
Lawrence James Tierney (March 15, 1919 – February 26, 2002) was an American actor known for his many screen portrayals of mobsters and tough guys, roles that mirrored his own frequent brushes with the law. In 2005, New York Times critic David Kehr observed that "the hulking Tierney was not so much an actor as a frightening force of nature".

Born To Kill (1947 Film)
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Sylvia Sidney
Sylvia Sidney (born Sophia Kosow; August 8, 1910 – July 1, 1999) was an American actress of stage, screen and film, with a career spanning over 70 years, who first rose to prominence in dozens of leading roles in the 1930s. Sidney later on came to be best known for her role as The Maitlands' afterlife case worker, Juno, in Tim Burton's 1988 hit comedy film Beetlejuice. She won a Saturn Award as Best Supporting Actress for her performance
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Broadway Theater
Broadway theatre, commonly known as Broadway, refers to the theatrical performances presented in the 41 professional theatres with 500 or more seats located in the Theater District and Lincoln Center along Broadway, in Midtown Manhattan, New York City. Along with London's West End theatre, Broadway theatre is widely considered to represent the highest level of commercial theatre in the English-speaking world. The Theater District is a popular Tourism in New York City">tourist attraction in New York City. According to The Broadway League, for the 2016–2017 season (which ended May 21, 2017), total attendance was 13,270,343 and Broadway shows had US$1,449,399,149 in grosses, with attendance down 0.4%, grosses up 5.5%, and playing weeks down 4.1%. The great majority of Broadway shows are musicals
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Summer Stock Theatre
Summer stock theatre is any theatre that presents stage productions only in the summer. The name combines the season with the tradition of staging shows by a resident company, reusing stock scenery and costumes. Summer stock theatres frequently take advantage of seasonal weather by having their productions outdoors or under tents set up temporarily for their use. Some smaller theatres still continue this tradition, and a few summer stock theatres have become highly regarded by both patrons as well as performers and designers. Equity status and pay for actors in these theatres varies greatly
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Vitaphone
Vitaphone was a sound film system used for feature films and nearly 1,000 short subjects made by Warner Bros. and its sister studio First National from 1926 to 1931. Vitaphone was the last major analog sound-on-disc system and the only one which was widely used and commercially successful. The soundtrack was not printed on the film itself, but issued separately on phonograph records. The discs, recorded at ​33 1--->⁄3 rpm (a speed first used for this system) and typically 16 inches (41 cm) in diameter, would be played on a turntable physically coupled to the projector motor while the film was being projected, achieving a frequency response of 4300 Hz. Many early talkies, such as The Jazz Singer (1927), used the Vitaphone system
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Emmy
An Emmy Award, or simply Emmy, is an American award that recognizes excellence in the television industry, and is the equivalent of an Academy Award (for film), the Tony Award (for theatre), and the Grammy Award (for music). Because Emmys are given in various sectors of the American television industry, they are presented in different annual ceremonies held throughout the year. The two events that receive the most media coverage are the Primetime Emmy Awards and the Daytime Emmy Awards, which recognize outstanding work in American primetime and daytime entertainment programming, respectively. Other notable Emmy Award ceremonies are those honoring national sports programming, national news and documentary shows, national business and financial reporting, and technological and engineering achievements in television, including the Primetime Engineering Emmy Awards
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Western Films
The Western is a genre of various arts which tell stories set primarily in the later half of the 19th century in the American Old West, often centering on the life of a nomadic cowboy or gunfighter armed with a revolver and a rifle who rides a horse. Cowboys and gunslingers typically wear Stetson hats, bandannas, spurs, cowboy boots and buckskins. Other characters include Native Americans, bandits, lawmen, bounty hunters, outlaws, soldiers (especially mounted cavalry), settlers, both farmers and ranchers, and townsfolk. Westerns often stress the harshness of the wilderness and frequently set the action in an arid, desolate landscape of deserts and mountains
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Fred MacMurray
Frederick Martin MacMurray (August 30, 1908 – November 5, 1991) was an American actor who appeared in more than 100 movies and a successful television series during a career that spanned nearly a half-century, from 1930 to the 1970s. MacMurray is best known for his role in the 1944 film noir Double Indemnity directed by Billy Wilder, in which he starred with Barbara Stanwyck. Later in his career, he performed in numerous Disney films, including The Absent-Minded Professor and The Shaggy Dog
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Larchmont, New York
Larchmont is a village located within the Town of Mamaroneck in Westchester County, New York, approximately 18 miles (29 km) northeast of Midtown Manhattan
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Fifth Avenue
Fifth Avenue is a major thoroughfare in the borough of Manhattan in New York City, United States. It stretches from West 143rd Street in Harlem to Waverly Place (Manhattan)">Washington Square North at Washington Square Park in Greenwich Village
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