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Clément Marot
Clément Marot
Clément Marot
(23 November 1496 – 12 September 1544) was a French poet of the Renaissance
Renaissance
period.[1]Clément Marot.Contents1 Biography1.1 Youth 1.2 At the French court 1.3 In Paris 1.4 In Ferrara 1.5 Back in Paris 1.6 Later life2 Editions 3 Influence 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] Youth[edit] Marot was born at Cahors, the capital of the province of Quercy, some time during the winter of 1496-1497. His father, Jean Marot (c. 1463-1523), whose more correct name appears to have been des Mares, Marais or Marets, was a Norman from the Caen
Caen
region and was also a poet. Jean held the post of escripvain (a cross between poet laureate and historiographer) to Anne of Brittany, Queen of France. Clément was the child of his second wife
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Renaissance
The Renaissance
Renaissance
(UK: /rɪˈneɪsəns/, US: /rɛnəˈsɑːns/)[1] is a period in European history, covering the span between the 14th and 17th centuries. It is an extension of the Middle Ages, and is bridged by the Age of Enlightenment
Age of Enlightenment
to modern history. It grew in fragments, with the very first traces found seemingly in Italy, coming to cover much of Europe, for some scholars marking the beginning of the modern age. The intellectual basis of the Renaissance
Renaissance
was its own invented version of humanism, derived from the concept of Roman Humanitas and the rediscovery of classical Greek philosophy, such as that of Protagoras, who said that "Man is the measure of all things." This new thinking became manifest in art, architecture, politics, science and literature
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Ercole D'Este
Ercole I d'Este, KG (26 October 1431 – 15 June 1505) was Duke of Ferrara
Ferrara
from 1471 until 1505. He was a member of the House of Este. He was nicknamed North Wind and The Diamond.[1]Contents1 Biography 2 Family and issue 3 See also 4 References 5 Footnotes 6 External linksBiography[edit] Ercole was born in 1431 in Ferrara
Ferrara
to Nicolò III and Ricciarda da Saluzzo
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Diane De Poitiers
Diane de Poitiers
Diane de Poitiers
(3 September 1499 – 25 April 1566) was a French noblewoman and a prominent courtier at the courts of king Francis I and his son, King Henry II of France. She became notorious as King Henry's chief mistress and in this role she wielded much influence and power at the French Court, which continued until Henry was mortally wounded in a tournament accident
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Cahors
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Cahors
Cahors
(French pronunciation: ​[kaɔʁ]; Occitan: Caors [kaˈurs, ˈkɔws, ˈkɔw]) is the capital of the Lot department in south-western France. Its site is dramatic, being contained on three sides within a U-shaped bend in the River Lot known as the presqu'île ("peninsula")
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Heresy
Heresy
Heresy
(/ˈhɛrəsi/) is any belief or theory that is strongly at variance with established beliefs or customs, in particular the accepted beliefs of a church or religious organization
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Prelate
A prelate is a high-ranking member of the clergy who is an ordinary or who ranks in precedence with ordinaries. The word derives from the Latin
Latin
prælatus, the past participle of præferre, which means "carry before", "be set above or over" or "prefer"; hence, a prelate is one set over others. The archetypal prelate is a bishop, whose prelature is his particular church. All other prelates, including the regular prelates such as abbots and major superiors, are based upon this original model of prelacy.Contents1 Related terminology 2 Territorial prelatures 3 Personal prelatures 4 Controversies Surrounding Retired Prelates 5 See also 6 ReferencesRelated terminology[edit] In a general sense, a prelate in the Catholic Church and other Christian churches is a bishop or another ecclesiastical person having ordinary authority over a jurisdiction equivalent to a diocese or a similar jurisdiction (e.g
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Easter
Easter,[nb 1] also called Pascha (Greek, Latin)[nb 2] or Resurrection Sunday,[3][4] is a festival and holiday celebrating the resurrection of Jesus
Jesus
from the dead, described in the New Testament
New Testament
as having occurred on the third day of his burial after his crucifixion by the Romans at Calvary
Calvary
c
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Étienne Dolet
Étienne Dolet
Étienne Dolet
(French: [dɔlɛ]; 3 August 1509 – 3 August 1546) was a French scholar, translator and printer. Dolet was a controversial figure throughout his lifetime. His early attacks upon the Inquisition, the city council and other authorities in Toulouse, together with his later publications in Lyon
Lyon
treating of theological subjects, roused the French Inquisition
Inquisition
to monitor his activities closely
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Protestant Reformation
The Reformation, or, more fully, the Protestant
Protestant
Reformation, was a schism in Western Christianity
Christianity
initiated by Martin Luther
Martin Luther
and continued by John Calvin, Huldrych Zwingli, Jacobus Arminius
Jacobus Arminius
and other Protestant Reformers
Protestant Reformers
in 16th-century Europe. It is usually considered to have started with the publication of the Ninety-five Theses
Ninety-five Theses
by Martin Luther
Martin Luther
in 1517 and lasted until the end of the Thirty Years' War in 1648. Although there had been earlier attempts to reform the Catholic Church – such as those of Jan Hus, Peter Waldo, John Wycliffe, and Girolamo Savonarola – Luther is widely acknowledged to have started the Reformation
Reformation
with the Ninety-five Theses
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Thomas Sébillet
Thomas Sébillet (1512–1589) was a French jurist, an essayist and a neo-Platonist grammarian.[1] He is now remembered for his Art Poétique (Poetic Art) from 1548, on French verse. He was strongly contradicted later by Joachim du Bellay, whose art poétique became normative. This "decapitation of richesse" lead to a centralisation of language, too (additionally to the concentration of political power). Equally advocate in Parliament, he was a favourite of Michel de l'Hospital, Étienne Pasquier
Étienne Pasquier
and Pierre de l'Estoile.[1] Works[edit]Art poetique franc̜ois. Pour l'instruction dés jeunes studieus, & encor peu avancéz en la pöesie franc̜oise (1548) Online text (in French) La Louenge des femmes, invention extraite du commentaire de Pantagruel, sur l'Androgyne de Platon (1551) Online text (in French) Contramours. L'antéros ou contr amour, de Messire Baptiste Fulgose, jadis duc de Gennes
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Ferrara
Ferrara
Ferrara
([ferˈraːra]  listen (help·info); Emilian: Frara) is a town and comune in Emilia-Romagna, northern Italy, capital of the Province of Ferrara. In 2016 it had 132,009 inhabitants.[1] It is situated 44 kilometres (27 miles) northeast of Bologna, on the Po di Volano, a branch channel of the main stream of the Po River, located 5 km (3 miles) north. The town has broad streets and numerous palaces dating from the Renaissance, when it hosted the court of the House of Este
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Field Of The Cloth Of Gold
The Field of the Cloth of Gold
Field of the Cloth of Gold
(French: Camp du Drap d'Or) was a site in Balinghem – between Ardres
Ardres
in France and Guînes
Guînes
in the then-English Pale of Calais – that hosted a summit from 7 to 24 June 1520, between King Henry VIII of England
Henry VIII of England
and King Francis I of France. The summit was arranged to increase the bond of friendship between the two kings following the Anglo-French treaty of 1514. These two monarchs would meet again in 1532 to arrange Francis's assistance in pressuring Pope Clement VII
Pope Clement VII
to pronounce Henry's first marriage as illegitimate
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Venice
Venice
Venice
(/ˈvɛnɪs/, VEN-iss; Italian: Venezia, [veˈnɛttsja] ( listen); Venetian: Venesia, [veˈnɛsja]) is a city in northeastern Italy
Italy
and the capital of the Veneto
Veneto
region. It is situated across a group of 118 small islands[1] that are separated by canals and linked by bridges, of which there are 400.[2][3] The islands are located in the shallow Venetian Lagoon, an enclosed bay that lies between the mouths of the Po and the Piave Rivers. Parts of Venice
Venice
are renowned for the beauty of their settings, their architecture, and artwork.[2] The lagoon and a part of the city are listed as a World Heritage Site.[2] In 2014, 264,579 people resided in Comune
Comune
di Venezia, of whom around 55,000 live in the historic city of Venice
Venice
(Centro storico)
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Pope Paul III
Pope
Pope
Paul III (Latin: Paulus III; 29 February 1468 – 10 November 1549), born Alessandro Farnese, was Pope
Pope
from 13 October 1534 to his death in 1549. He came to the papal throne in an era following the sack of Rome
Rome
in 1527 and rife with uncertainties in the Catholic Church
Catholic Church
following the Protestant Reformation. During his pontificate, and in the spirit of the Counter-Reformation, new Catholic religious orders and societies, such as the Jesuits, the Barnabites, and the Congregation of the Oratory, attracted a popular following. He convened the Council of Trent
Council of Trent
in 1545. He was a significant patron of the arts and employed nepotism to advance the power and fortunes of his family
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Protestants
Protestantism
Protestantism
is the second largest form of Christianity
Christianity
with collectively more than 900 million adherents worldwide or nearly 40% of all Christians.[1][2][3][a] It or
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