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Clément-Talbot
Clément-Talbot
Clément-Talbot
Limited was a British motor vehicle manufacturer with its works in Ladbroke Grove, North Kensington, London, founded in 1902. It was renamed Sunbeam-Talbot
Sunbeam-Talbot
Limited in 1938. The new business's capital was arranged by the Earl of Shrewsbury and Talbot, shareholders included automobile manufacturer, Adolphe Clément, along with Baron A. Lucas and Emile Lamberjack[note 1] all of France.[1][page needed] The shareholders sold it in late 1919 to the company that became S T D Motors. It kept its separate identity making cars designed specially for it or by its employees until 1934. After S T D's financial collapse it was bought by the Rootes brothers
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Talbot (dog)
The Talbot was a type of white hunting dog. It is now extinct and has been credited with being an ancestor of the modern beagle[1] and bloodhound.[2] The term talbot is used in heraldry to refer to a good-mannered hunting dog.Contents1 History 2 Cultural legacy 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit]Carter of Castle Martin Crest: a talbot standing above a crownThe breed has been said to have originated in Normandy, perhaps to have been the white St. Hubert Hound, and to have been brought to England
England
by William the Conqueror, but this is not supported by evidence
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HM Prison Wormwood Scrubs
Coordinates: 51°31′0″N 0°14′25″W / 51.51667°N 0.24028°W / 51.51667; -0.24028Her Majesty's Prison
Prison
Wormwood ScrubsEntrance to Wormwood Scrubs
Wormwood Scrubs
PrisonLocation Wormwood Scrubs, LondonSecurity class Adult Male/ Category BPopulation 1,279 (as of 22 December 2015)Opened 1874–75Managed by HM Prison
Prison
ServicesGovernor Steve BradfordWebsite Wormwood Scrubs
Wormwood Scrubs
at justice.gov.ukHM Prison
Prison
Wormwood Scrubs
Wormwood Scrubs
(informally "The Scrubs") is a Category B men's prison located in the Wormwood Scrubs
Wormwood Scrubs
area of the London
London
Borough of Hammersmith and Fulham, in inner West London, England
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Special
Special
Special
or the specials or variation, may refer to:.mw-parser-output .tocright float:right;clear:right;width:auto;background:none;padding:.5em 0 .8em 1.4em;margin-bottom:.5em .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-left clear:left .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-both clear:both .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-none clear:none Contents1 Policing 2 Literature 3 Film and television 4 Music4.1 Albums 4.2 Songs5 Computing 6 Other uses 7 See alsoPolicing[edit] Specials, Ulster
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International Standard Book Number
The International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a numeric commercial book identifier which is intended to be unique.[a][b] Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each separate edition and variation (except reprintings) of a publication. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book will each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is ten digits long if assigned before 2007, and thirteen digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007. The method of assigning an ISBN is nation-specific and varies between countries, often depending on how large the publishing industry is within a country. The initial ISBN identification format was devised in 1967, based upon the 9-digit Standard Book
Book
Numbering (SBN) created in 1966
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Simca
Simca
Simca
(Société Industrielle de Mécanique et Carrosserie Automobile; Mechanical and Automotive Body Manufacturing Company) was a French automaker, founded in November 1934 by Fiat
Fiat
and directed from July 1935 to May 1963 by Italian Henri Théodore Pigozzi. Simca
Simca
was affiliated with Fiat
Fiat
and, after Simca
Simca
bought Ford's French activities, became increasingly controlled by the Chrysler
Chrysler
Group. In 1970, Simca became a subsidiary and brand of Chrysler
Chrysler
Europe, ending its period as an independent company. Simca
Simca
disappeared in 1978, when Chrysler divested its European operations to another French automaker, PSA Peugeot
Peugeot
Citroën
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Suresnes
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Suresnes
Suresnes
(French pronunciation: ​[sy.ʁɛn]) is a commune in the western suburbs of Paris, France. It is located 9.3 km (5.8 mi) from the center of Paris. The nearest communes are Neuilly-sur-Seine, Puteaux, Rueil-Malmaison, Saint-Cloud
Saint-Cloud
and Boulogne-Billancourt
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W & G Du Cros
W & G Du Cros Limited also well-known as W & G was a business established in 1901 as a motor importers and dealership by Harvey Du Cros, founder of the pneumatic tyre industry also founder and head of the Dunlop Rubber
Dunlop Rubber
Company and a major investor in businesses connected to the automobile
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Armistice Of 11 November 1918
The Armistice
Armistice
of 11 November 1918 was the armistice that ended fighting on land, sea and air in World War I
World War I
between the Allies and their last opponent, Germany. Previous armistices had eliminated Bulgaria, the Ottoman Empire
Ottoman Empire
and the Austro-Hungarian Empire. Also known as the Armistice
Armistice
of Compiègne from the place where it was signed, it came into force at 11 a.m
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Fiscal Horsepower
The tax horsepower or taxable horsepower was an early system by which taxation rates for automobiles were reckoned in some European countries, such as Britain, Belgium, Germany, France, and Italy; some US states like Illinois
Illinois
charged license plate purchase and renewal fees for passenger automobiles based on taxable horsepower. The tax horsepower rating was computed not from actual engine power but by a simple mathematical formula based on cylinder dimensions
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Stained Glass
The term stained glass can refer to coloured glass as a material or to works created from it. Throughout its thousand-year history, the term has been applied almost exclusively to the windows of churches, mosques and other significant buildings. Although traditionally made in flat panels and used as windows, the creations of modern stained glass artists also include three-dimensional structures and sculpture. Modern vernacular usage has often extended the term "stained glass" to include domestic leadlight and objets d'art created from came glasswork exemplified in the famous lamps of Louis Comfort Tiffany. As a material stained glass is glass that has been coloured by adding metallic salts during its manufacture. The coloured glass is crafted into stained glass windows in which small pieces of glass are arranged to form patterns or pictures, held together (traditionally) by strips of lead and supported by a rigid frame
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Fresco
Fresco
Fresco
(plural frescos or frescoes) is a technique of mural painting executed upon freshly laid, or wet lime plaster. Water
Water
is used as the vehicle for the dry-powder pigment to merge with the plaster, and with the setting of the plaster, the painting becomes an integral part of the wall. The word fresco (Italian: affresco) is derived from the Italian adjective fresco meaning "fresh", and may thus be contrasted with fresco-secco or secco mural painting techniques, which are applied to dried plaster, to supplement painting in fresco
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Gilding
The term gilding covers a number of decorative techniques for applying fine gold leaf or powder to solid surfaces such as wood, stone, or metal to give a thin coating of gold. A gilded object is also described as "gilt". Where metal is gilded, it was traditionally silver in the West, to make silver-gilt (or vermeil) objects, but gilt-bronze is commonly used in China, and also called ormolu if it is Western. Methods of gilding include hand application and glueing, chemical gilding, and electroplating, the last also called gold plating.[1] Parcel-gilt (partial gilt) objects are only gilded over part of their surfaces
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Ionic Order
The Ionic order
Ionic order
forms one of the three classical orders of classical architecture, the other two canonic orders being the Doric and the Corinthian. There are two lesser orders: the Tuscan (a plainer Doric), and the rich variant of Corinthian called the composite order, both added by 16th-century Italian architectural writers, based on Roman practice. Of the three canonic orders, the Ionic order
Ionic order
has the narrowest columns. The Ionic capital is characterized by the use of volutes
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Kensal Green Cemetery
Kensal Green
Kensal Green
Cemetery is in Kensal Green
Kensal Green
in the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea in London, England. Inspired by Père Lachaise Cemetery in Paris, it was founded by the barrister George Frederick Carden.[1] The cemetery opened in 1833 and comprises 72 acres of grounds, including two conservation areas, adjoining a canal. The cemetery is home to at least 33 species of bird and other wildlife. This distinctive cemetery has memorials ranging from large mausoleums housing the rich and famous to many distinctive smaller graves and includes special areas dedicated to the very young. It has three chapels, and serves all faiths.[2] The cemetery was immortalised in the lines of G. K
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Great Western Railway
The Great Western Railway
Great Western Railway
(GWR) was a British railway company that linked London
London
with the south-west and west of England, the Midlands, and most of Wales. It was founded in 1833, received its enabling Act of Parliament on 31 August 1835 and ran its first trains in 1838. It was engineered by Isambard Kingdom Brunel, who chose a broad gauge of 7 ft (2,134 mm)—later slightly widened to 7 ft 1⁄4 in (2,140 mm)—but, from 1854, a series of amalgamations saw it also operate 4 ft 8 1⁄2 in (1,435 mm) standard-gauge trains; the last broad-gauge services were operated in 1892
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