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Civil Rights Act Of 1960
The Civil Rights Act of 1960
Civil Rights Act of 1960
(Pub.L. 86–449, 74 Stat. 89, enacted May 6, 1960) was a United States federal law
United States federal law
that established federal inspection of local voter registration polls and introduced penalties for anyone who obstructed someone's attempt to register to vote. It was designed to deal with discriminatory laws and practices in the segregated South, by which blacks and Mexican Texans had been effectively disfranchised since the late 19th and start of the 20th century. It extended the life of the Civil Rights Commission, previously limited to two years, to oversee registration and voting practices
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Acronym
An acronym is a word or name formed as an abbreviation from the initial components in a phrase or a word, usually individual letters (as in NATO
NATO
or laser) and sometimes syllables (as in Benelux). There are no universal standards of the multiple names for such abbreviations and of their orthographic styling. In English and most other languages, such abbreviations historically had limited use, but they became much more common in the 20th century
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United States Senate Committee On The Judiciary
The United States Senate
United States Senate
Committee on the Judiciary, informally the Senate Judiciary Committee, is a standing committee of 21 U.S. Senators whose role is to oversee of the Department of Justice (DOJ), consider executive nominations, and review pending legislation.[1][2] The Judiciary Committee's oversight of the DOJ includes all of the agencies under the DOJ's jurisdiction, such as the FBI
FBI
and the Department of Homeland Security
Department of Homeland Security
(DHS). The Committee considers presidential nominations for positions in the DOJ, the Office of National Drug Control Policy, the State Justice Institute, and certain positions in the Department of Commerce
Department of Commerce
and DHS. It is also in charge of holding hearings and investigating judicial nominations to the Supreme Court, the U.S. court of appeals, the U.S
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Federal Bureau Of Investigation
The Federal Bureau of Investigation
Bureau of Investigation
(FBI), formerly the Bureau of Investigation (BOI), is the domestic intelligence and security service of the United States, and its principal federal law enforcement agency. Operating under the jurisdiction of the US Department of Justice, the FBI is also a member of the U.S. Intelligence Community and reports to/ both the Attorney General and the Director of National Intelligence.[3] A leading U.S. counter-terrorism, counterintelligence, and criminal investigative organization, the FBI has jurisdiction over violations of more than 200 categories of federal crimes.[4][5] Although many of the FBI's functions are unique, its activities in support of national security are comparable to those of the British MI5
MI5
and the Russian FSB
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Attorney General
In most common law jurisdictions, the attorney general (sometimes abbreviated as AG) or attorney-general (plural: attorneys general (traditional) or attorney generals)[1][2][3] is the main legal advisor to the government, and in some jurisdictions, they may also have executive responsibility for law enforcement, prosecutions or even responsibility for legal affairs generally
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United States Armed Forces
Gen Joseph Dunford, USMCVice Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen Paul J. Selva, USAF Senior Enlisted Advisor
Senior Enlisted Advisor
to the Chairman CSM John W. Troxell, USAManpowerMilitary age 17 with parental consent, 18 for voluntary service
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Equal Employment Opportunity Commission
The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) is a federal agency that administers and enforces civil rights laws against workplace discrimination. The EEOC investigates discrimination complaints based on an individual's race, children, national origin, religion, sex, age, disability, sexual orientation, gender identity, genetic information, and retaliation for reporting, participating in, and/or opposing a discriminatory practice.[3]Contents1 History 2 Staffing, workload, and backlog 3 Race and ethnicity 4 Investigative compliance policy 5 Increase in disability-based charges 6 Home Depot disability discrimination suit 7 2012 profile 8 Criticism 9 Commissioners 10 Chairs 11 See also 12 References 13 External linksHistory[edit] On March 6, 1963, President John F
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United States House Of Representatives
Majority (238)     Republican (238)Minority (193)     Democratic (193)Vacant (4)     Vacant (4)Length of termTwo yearsElectionsVoting systemFirst-past-the-post in most states; nonpartisan blanket primary with a majoritarian second round in 3 statesLast electionNovember 8, 2016Next electionNovember 6, 2018Redistricting State legislatures or redistricting commissions, varies by stateMeeting placeHouse of Representatives chamber United States
United States

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House Judiciary Committee
The U.S. House Committee on the Judiciary, also called the House Judiciary Committee, is a standing committee of the United States House of Representatives. It is charged with overseeing the administration of justice within the federal courts, administrative agencies and Federal law enforcement entities. The Judiciary Committee is also the committee responsible for impeachments of federal officials. Because of the legal nature of its oversight, committee members usually have a legal background, but this is not required. In the 115th Congress, the chairman of the committee is Republican Bob Goodlatte of Virginia, and the ranking minority member was Democrat John Conyers
John Conyers
of Michigan. On November 26, 2017, Conyers stepped down from his position as ranking member, while he faces an ethics investigation.[1] On November 28, 2017, Jerrold Nadler
Jerrold Nadler
of New York was named as acting ranking member
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United States House Committee On Rules
The Committee on Rules, or (more commonly) Rules Committee, is a committee of the United States House of Representatives. Rather than being responsible for a specific area of policy, as most other committees are, it is in charge of determining under what rule other bills will come to the floor
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Robert Kastenmeier
Robert William Kastenmeier (January 24, 1924 – March 20, 2015) was a United States politician. He represented Wisconsin in the United States House of Representatives from 1959 to 1991, and was a member of the Democratic Party.[1][2]Contents1 Biography1.1 Education 1.2 Military service 1.3 Political career2 References 3 Further reading 4 External linksBiography[edit] Education[edit] Kastenmeier was born in Beaver Dam, Dodge County, Wisconsin, where he attended public school. He continued his education at Carleton College and at the University of Wisconsin Law School, where he received his LL.B. in 1952. After being admitted to the bar, he began the practice of law in Watertown, Wisconsin.[3] Military service[edit] He entered the Army as a private in February 1943 and served in the Philippines. He was discharged on August 15, 1946 as a first lieutenant
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Explosives
An explosive material, also called an explosive, is a reactive substance that contains a great amount of potential energy that can produce an explosion if released suddenly, usually accompanied by the production of light, heat, sound, and pressure. An explosive charge is a measured quantity of explosive material, which may be composed of a single ingredient or a combination of two or more. The potential energy stored in an explosive material may, for example, bechemical energy, such as nitroglycerin or grain dust pressurized gas, such as a gas cylinder or aerosol can nuclear energy, such as in the fissile isotopes uranium-235 and plutonium-239 Explosive
Explosive
materials may be categorized by the speed at which they expand. Materials that detonate (the front of the chemical reaction moves faster through the material than the speed of sound) are said to be "high explosives" and materials that deflagrate are said to be "low explosives"
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Fifteenth Amendment To The United States Constitution
The Fifteenth Amendment (Amendment XV) to the United States Constitution prohibits the federal and state governments from denying a citizen the right to vote based on that citizen's "race, color, or previous condition of servitude". It was ratified on February 3, 1870, as the third and last of the Reconstruction Amendments. In the final years of the American Civil War
American Civil War
and the Reconstruction Era that followed, Congress repeatedly debated the rights of the millions of black former slaves. By 1869, amendments had been passed to abolish slavery and provide citizenship and equal protection under the laws, but the election of Ulysses S. Grant
Ulysses S. Grant
to the presidency in 1868 convinced a majority of Republicans that protecting the franchise of black male voters was important for the party's future
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Poll Tax (United States)
A poll tax is a tax levied as a fixed sum on every liable individual. Although often associated with states of the former Confederacy, poll taxes were also in place in some northern and western states, including California, Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Hampshire, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Vermont
Vermont
and Wisconsin.[1] Poll taxes had been a major source of government funding among the colonies which formed the United States. Poll taxes made up from one-third to one-half of the tax revenue of colonial Massachusetts. Various privileges of citizenship, including voter registration or issuance of driving licenses and resident hunting and fishing licenses, were conditioned on payment of poll taxes to encourage collection of this tax revenue
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Puerto Rico
Coordinates: 18°12′N 66°30′W / 18.2°N 66.5°W / 18.2; -66.5Commonwealth of Puerto Rico Estado Libre Asociado de Puerto Rico  (Spanish)FlagCoat of armsMotto: "Joannes est nomen ejus" (Latin) "John is his name"Anthem: "La Borinqueña"[a] "The Borinquenian""The Star-Spangled Banner"Great SealStatus Unincorporated territoryCapital and largest city San Juan 18°27′N 66°6′W / 18.450°N 66.100°W / 18.450; -66.100Official languages Spanish English[1]Common languages94.7% Spanish[2]5.3% EnglishEthnic groups75.8% White12.4% Black3.3% Two or more races0.5% American Indian & Alaskan Native0.2% Asian<0.1% Pacific Islander7.8% Other[3]DemonymPuerto Rican (formal) American (since 1917) Boricua (colloquial)Country  United StatesGovernment Commonwealth[b
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African-Americans
Origins of the civil rights movement
Origins of the civil rights movement
· Civil rights movement
Civil rights movement
· Black Power movementPost–civil rights era New Great MigrationCultureStudies Art Business history Black conductors Black mecca Black sc
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