HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Circular Error Probable
In the military science of ballistics, circular error probable (CEP) (also circular error probability or circle of equal probability[1]) is a measure of a weapon system's precision. It is defined as the radius of a circle, centered on the mean, whose boundary is expected to include the landing points of 50% of the rounds.[2][3] That is, if a given bomb design has a CEP of 100 metres (330 ft), when 100 are targeted at the same point, 50 will fall within a 100 m circle around their average impact point. (The distance between the target point and the average impact point is referred to as bias.)Contents1 Concept 2 Conversion between CEP, DRMS, 2DRMS, and R95 3 Use in popular culture 4 See also 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksConcept[edit]20 hits distribution exampleThe original concept of CEP was based on a circular bivariate normal distribution (CBN) with CEP as a parameter of the CBN just as μ and σ are parameters of the normal distribution
[...More...]

"Circular Error Probable" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Pendulum
A pendulum is a weight suspended from a pivot so that it can swing freely.[1] When a pendulum is displaced sideways from its resting, equilibrium position, it is subject to a restoring force due to gravity that will accelerate it back toward the equilibrium position. When released, the restoring force acting on the pendulum's mass causes it to oscillate about the equilibrium position, swinging back and forth. The time for one complete cycle, a left swing and a right swing, is called the period
[...More...]

"Pendulum" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Covariance
In probability theory and statistics, covariance is a measure of the joint variability of two random variables.[1] If the greater values of one variable mainly correspond with the greater values of the other variable, and the same holds for the lesser values, (i.e., the variables tend to show similar behavior), the covariance is positive.[2] In the opposite case, when the greater values of one variable mainly correspond to the lesser values of the other, (i.e., the variables tend to show opposite behavior), the covariance is negative. The sign of the covariance therefore shows the tendency in the linear relationship between the variables. The magnitude of the covariance is not easy to interpret because it is not normalized and hence depends on the magnitudes of the variables
[...More...]

"Covariance" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
[...More...]

"Special" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
[...More...]

"International Standard Book Number" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

MIT Press
The MIT Press
MIT Press
is a university press affiliated with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge, Massachusetts
Cambridge, Massachusetts
(United States).Contents1 History 2 Business 3 Retail outlet 4 Logo 5 List of journals published by the MIT Press 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] The MIT Press
MIT Press
traces its origins back to 1926 when MIT published under its own name a lecture series entitled Problems of Atomic Dynamics given by the visiting German physicist and later Nobel Prize
Nobel Prize
winner, Max Born. Six years later, MIT's publishing operations were first formally instituted by the creation of an imprint called Technology Press in 1932. This imprint was founded by James R. Killian, Jr., at the time editor of MIT's alumni magazine and later to become MIT president
[...More...]

"MIT Press" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Donald Angus Mackenzie
Donald Angus MacKenzie FBA FRSE FAcSS (born 5 May 1950)[1] is a Professor of Sociology at the University of Edinburgh, Scotland. His work constitutes a crucial contribution to the field of science and technology studies. He has also developed research in the field of social studies of finance. He has undertaken widely cited work on the history of statistics, eugenics, nuclear weapons, computing and finance, among other things. In August 2006, MacKenzie was awarded the Chancellor's Award from Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh
Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh
and Chancellor of the University of Edinburgh, for his contributions to the field of science and technology studies. He is also the winner of the 1993 Robert K. Merton Award of the American Sociological Association
American Sociological Association
among many others. Books[edit]MacKenzie, Donald (1981)
[...More...]

"Donald Angus Mackenzie" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Naval Institute Press
The United States Naval Institute
United States Naval Institute
(USNI), based in Annapolis, Maryland, is a private, non-profit (EIN:52-0643040), professional military association that seeks to offer independent, nonpartisan forums for debate of national defense and security issues. In addition to publishing magazines and books, the Naval Institute holds several annual conferences. Established in 1873, the Naval Institute currently has about 50,000 members, mostly active and retired personnel of the United States Navy, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard. The organization also has members in over 90 countries. The organization has no official or funding ties to the United States Naval Academy or the U.S
[...More...]

"Naval Institute Press" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

State University Of New York Press
The State University of New York
State University of New York
Press (or SUNY Press), is a university press and a Center for Scholarly Communication. The Press is part of the State University of New York
State University of New York
system and is located in Albany, New York. It was founded in 1966, and publishes scholarly works in various fields.[2] References[edit]^ " SUNY Press
SUNY Press
- Sales Representation"
[...More...]

"State University Of New York Press" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Hoyt Distribution
The Nakagami distribution
Nakagami distribution
or the Nakagami-m distribution is a probability distribution related to the gamma distribution
[...More...]

"Hoyt Distribution" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Clear And Present Danger (film)
Clear and Present Danger
Clear and Present Danger
is a 1994 American spy thriller film directed by Phillip Noyce[2] and based on Tom Clancy's novel of the same name. It was preceded by the 1990 film The Hunt for Red October
The Hunt for Red October
and the 1992 film Patriot Games, all three featuring Clancy's character Jack Ryan. It is the last film version of Clancy's novels to feature Harrison Ford as Ryan and James Earl Jones
James Earl Jones
as Vice Admiral James Greer, as well as the final installment directed by Noyce. As in the novel, Ryan is appointed CIA Acting Deputy Director, and discovers he is being kept in the dark by colleagues who are conducting a covert war against a drug cartel in Colombia, apparently with the approval of the President
[...More...]

"Clear And Present Danger (film)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Root Mean Square
In statistics and its applications, the root mean square (abbreviated RMS or rms) is defined as the square root of the mean square (the arithmetic mean of the squares of a set of numbers).[1] The RMS is also known as the quadratic mean and is a particular case of the generalized mean with exponent 2
[...More...]

"Root Mean Square" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Circle
A circle is a simple closed shape. It is the set of all points in a plane that are at a given distance from a given point, the centre; equivalently it is the curve traced out by a point that moves so that its distance from a given point is constant. The distance between any of the points and the centre is called the radius. This article is about circles in Euclidean geometry, and, in particular, the Euclidean plane, except where otherwise noted. A circle is a simple closed curve which divides the plane into two regions: an interior and an exterior
[...More...]

"Circle" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Radius
In classical geometry, a radius of a circle or sphere is any of the line segments from its center to its perimeter, and in more modern usage, it is also their length. The name comes from the Latin
Latin
radius, meaning ray but also the spoke of a chariot wheel.[1] The plural of radius can be either radii (from the Latin
Latin
plural) or the conventional English plural radiuses.[2] The typical abbreviation and mathematical variable name for radius is r. By extension, the diameter d is defined as twice the radius:[3] d ≐ 2 r ⇒ r = d 2 . displaystyle ddoteq 2rquad Rightarrow quad r= frac d 2 . If an object does not have a center, the term may refer to its circumradius, the radius of its circumscribed circle or circumscribed sphere
[...More...]

"Radius" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Variance
In probability theory and statistics, variance is the expectation of the squared deviation of a random variable from its mean. Informally, it measures how far a set of (random) numbers are spread out from their average value. Variance
Variance
has a central role in statistics, where some ideas that use it include descriptive statistics, statistical inference, hypothesis testing, goodness of fit, and Monte Carlo sampling. Variance
Variance
is an important tool in the sciences, where statistical analysis of data is common
[...More...]

"Variance" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Pendulum (mathematics)
The mathematics of pendulums are in general quite complicated. Simplifying assumptions can be made, which in the case of a simple pendulum allow the equations of motion to be solved analytically for small-angle oscillations.Contents1 Simple gravity pendulum 2 Small-angle approximation2.1 Rule of thumb for pendulum length3 Arbitrary-amplitude period3.1 Legendre polynomial
Legendre polynomial
solution for the elliptic integral 3.2 Power series solution for the elliptic integral 3.3 Arithmetic-geometric mean solution for elliptic integral4 Examples 5 Compound pendulum 6 Physica
[...More...]

"Pendulum (mathematics)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.