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Ci Fan Tuan
Cífàntuán is a kind of food in Chinese cuisine, originating from Shanghai.[1][2] It is made by tightly wrapping a piece of youtiao (fried dough) with glutinous rice. It is usually eaten as breakfast together with sweetened or savory soy milk in Eastern China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong
Hong Kong
(where it is known as chi faan). In recent years, there have been innovations on the traditional cifantuan, originating from Hong Kong
Hong Kong
and Taiwan, then reverse-introduced into Shanghai
Shanghai
and its vicinity. Today, cifantuan is commonly available in two varieties. The "savoury" variety includes ingredients such as zha cai (pickled vegetable), rousong (pork floss) and small pieces of youtiao being wrapped in the rice ball. The "sweet" variety adds sugar and sometimes sesame to the filling. See also[edit]List of rice dishes Youtiao ZhaliangReferences[edit]^ News365.com.cn
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Dim Sum
Dim sum
Dim sum
/ˈdimˈsʌm/ (Chinese: 點心; pinyin: diǎnxīn; Cantonese Yale: dímsām) is a style of Chinese cuisine
Chinese cuisine
(particularly Cantonese but also other varieties) prepared as small bite-sized portions of food served in small steamer baskets or on small plates. Dim sum dishes are usually served with tea and together form a full tea brunch. Dim sum
Dim sum
traditionally are served as fully cooked, ready-to-serve dishes. In Cantonese
Cantonese
teahouses, carts with dim sum will be served around the restaurant for diners to order from without leaving their seats
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Sou (pastry)
Sou is a type of dried flaky Chinese pastry
Chinese pastry
found in a variety of Chinese cuisines.Contents1 Dim sum 2 Shanghai cuisine 3 Gallery 4 See also 5 ReferencesDim sum[edit] In dim sum restaurants, char siu sou (叉燒酥) is the most common version available. Other varieties may include century egg and lotus seed paste. These are commonly found in Hong Kong
Hong Kong
or Singapore
Singapore
in Asia. They may occasionally be found in some overseas Chinatowns. Shanghai cuisine[edit] In Shanghai cuisine, a number of dried varieties are available, such as peanut sou (花生酥), green bean sou (綠豆酥) or walnut sou (核桃酥)
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Shanghai Hairy Crab
The Chinese mitten crab
Chinese mitten crab
( Eriocheir
Eriocheir
sinensis; Chinese: t 大閘蟹, s 大闸蟹, p dàzháxiè, lit. "big sluice crab"), also known as the Shanghai
Shanghai
hairy crab (上海毛蟹, p Shànghǎi máoxiè), is a medium-sized burrowing crab that is named for its furry claws, which resemble mittens. It is native to rivers, estuaries and other coastal habitats of eastern Asia from Korea
Korea
in the north to the Fujian
Fujian
province of China
China
in the south
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Hongshao Pork
Red braised pork belly
Red braised pork belly
or hong shao rou (simplified Chinese: 红烧肉; traditional Chinese: 紅燒肉; pinyin: hóngshāoròu) is a classic pork dish from mainland China, red cooked using pork belly and a combination of ginger, garlic, aromatic spices, chilli peppers, sugar, light and dark soy, and rice wine. The pork belly is cooked until the fat and skin are gelatinous and melt easily in the mouth, while the sauce is usually thick, sweet and fairly sticky
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Jiaozi
Jiaozi
Jiaozi
([tɕjàu.tsɨ] ( listen)) are a kind of Chinese dumpling, commonly eaten in China
China
and other parts of East Asia. They are one of the major foods eaten during the Chinese New Year
Chinese New Year
and year-round in the northern provinces. Though considered part of Chinese cuisine, jiaozi are popular in other parts of Asia and in Western countries. Jiaozi
Jiaozi
typically consist of a ground meat and/or vegetable filling wrapped into a thinly rolled piece of dough, which is then sealed by pressing the edges together
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Lion's Head (food)
Lion's Head (simplified Chinese: 狮子头; traditional Chinese: 獅子頭; pinyin: Shīzitóu) or stewed meatball is a dish from the Huaiyang cuisine
Huaiyang cuisine
of eastern China, consisting of large pork meatballs stewed with vegetables. There are two varieties: white (or plain), and red (红烧, cooked with soy sauce). The plain variety is usually stewed or steamed with napa cabbage. The red variety can be stewed with cabbage or cooked with bamboo shoots and tofu derivatives. The minced meat rich in fat is more likely to bring better texture, addition of chopped water chestnut also works. The name "lion's head", derives from the shape of the meatball which is supposed to resemble the head of the Chinese guardian lion, specifically. The dish originated in Yangzhou
Yangzhou
and Zhenjiang, to a lesser degree, Huai'an
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Qingtuan
Qīngtuán (青团) is a form of dumpling that is green, common throughout Chinese cuisine. It is made of glutinous rice mixed with Chinese mugwort or barley grass. This is then usually filled with sweet red or black bean paste. The exact technique for making qingtuan is quite complicated and the grass involved is only edible in the early spring, so it is typically only available around the time of the Qingming Festival
Qingming Festival
(April 4 or 5), with which the dumpling has become associated. Much of the qingtuan consumed in China is prepared and consumed as street food from local vendors.[1] See also[edit]Kusa mochi, the Japanese form of this dish, flavored with Jersey cudweed Caozai guo, the Taiwanese form of this dish, flavored with Jersey cudweedReferences[edit]^ Liu, Zat. "Shanghai food tour: Quest for the best qingtuan". CNN Travel, 31 Mar 2011
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Shanghai Cumian
Cumian
Cumian
[tsʰu˥mjɛn˥˩] (lit. "thick noodles") is a thick Chinese noodle made from wheat flour and water
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Shanghai Fried Noodles
Shanghai
Shanghai
fried noodles (Chinese: 上海粗炒; pinyin: Shànghǎi Cūchǎo) is a dish made from Shanghai-style noodles, which can be found in most Chinese food markets. The more commonly known Japanese udon can be used as a substitute. The noodles are stir-fried with beef cutlets, bok choy, and onion. The dish is a staple of Shanghai cuisine, which is usually served at dumpling houses
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Shengjian Mantou
Shengjian mantou
Shengjian mantou
(Wu Chinese: ssanji mhoedhou, also known as the shengjianbao outside the Wu-speaking region) is a type of small, pan-fried baozi (steamed buns) which is a specialty of Shanghai. It is usually filled with pork and gelatin that melts into soup/liquid when cooked. Shengjian mantou
Shengjian mantou
has been one of the most common breakfast items in Shanghai
Shanghai
since the early 1900s. As a ubiquitous breakfast item, it has a significant place in Shanghainese
Shanghainese
culture.Contents1 Naming 2 Ingredients 3 Serving 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksNaming[edit] In Modern Chinese, a filled bun is usually called baozi or bao, while an unfilled (plain) bun is usually called a mantou
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Song Gao
Sōng gāo (鬆糕, literally "loose cake"; Shanghainese: [soŋ ɡɔ]) is a Shanghai
Shanghai
snack composed of rice flour, sugar, and water, with azuki beans embedded throughout the cake. Giant pink-colored azuki beans with a diameter of about 1 inch (25 mm) are embedded on top of the cake; conventional sized azuki beans are embedded inside the cake. The cake also has a red bean (azuki) paste filling. This dessert is steamed[1][2] as a large round cake and is then partitioned into sections for eating. Madame Chiang Kai-shek, who loved to eat sōng gāo, had the Grand Hotel of Taipei to include her version of the cake on the hotel’s menu, which the hotel continues to offer to this day. See also[edit]List of cakesReferences[edit]^ McCawley, J.D. (2004). The Eater's Guide to Chinese Characters. University of Chicago Press. p. 189. ISBN 978-0-226-55592-8. Retrieved January 29, 2017.  ^ The Pleasures of Cooking. 1984
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Stinky Tofu
Stinky tofu
Stinky tofu
(Chinese: 臭豆腐; pinyin: chòudòufu) is a Chinese form of fermented tofu that has a strong odor
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China
China, officially the People's Republic
People's Republic
of China
China
(PRC), is a unitary sovereign state in East Asia
East Asia
and the world's most populous country, with a population of around 1.404 billion.[13] Covering approximately 9,600,000 square kilometers (3,700,000 sq mi), it is the third- or fourth-largest country by total area,[k][19] depending on the source consulted. China
China
also has the most neighbor countries in the world
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Tangbao
Tangbao
Tangbao
or soup buns are a large, soup-filled type of steamed buns (baozi) in Chinese cuisine.[1][2] They are also sometimes known as guantang bao or soup-filled buns. Various varieties are found, with some name variations in various parts of the country
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Tea Egg
Tea
Tea
egg is a typical Chinese savory food commonly sold as a snack, in which a boiled egg is cracked slightly and then boiled again in tea, sauce and/or spices. It is also known as marble egg because cracks in the egg shell create darkened lines with marble-like patterns. Commonly sold by street vendors or in night markets in most Chinese communities throughout the world,[1] it is also commonly served in Asian restaurants. Although it originated from China
China
and is traditionally associated with Chinese cuisine, other similar recipes and variations have been developed throughout Asia.Contents1 Preparation1.1 Regular/traditional method 1.2 Quick method2 Appearance and flavor 3 Regional3.1 Mainland China 3.2 Taiwan 3.3 Indonesia 3.4 Malaysia4 See also 5 ReferencesPreparation[edit] Regular/traditional method[edit] Fragrant and flavorful tea eggs are a traditional Chinese food
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