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Church Of St. Luke In The Fields, Greenwich Village
Coordinates: 40°43′57″N 74°00′25″W / 40.7324°N 74.007°W / 40.7324; -74.007The church in 2015The Church of St. Luke in the Fields
Church of St. Luke in the Fields
is an Episcopal church located at 487 Hudson Street between Christopher and Barrow Streets at the intersection of Grove Street in the West Village
West Village
neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. The church was constructed in 1821-22 and has been attributed to both John Heath, the building contractor, and James N. Wells.[1] The church is affiliated with the St. Luke's School, an elementary school located on the same block
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[note 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation.[1] To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.[2]Contents1 History 2 Geodetic datum 3 Horizontal coordinates3.1 Latitude
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Special
Special
Special
or the specials or variation, may refer to:.mw-parser-output .tocright float:right;clear:right;width:auto;background:none;padding:.5em 0 .8em 1.4em;margin-bottom:.5em .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-left clear:left .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-both clear:both .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-none clear:none Contents1 Policing 2 Literature 3 Film and television 4 Music4.1 Albums 4.2 Songs5 Computing 6 Other uses 7 See alsoPolicing[edit] Specials, Ulster
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Telemann
Georg Philipp Telemann
Georg Philipp Telemann
(24 March [O.S. 14 March] 1681 – 25 June 1767) (German pronunciation: [ˈteːləman]) was a German Baroque composer and multi-instrumentalist. Almost completely self-taught in music, he became a composer against his family's wishes. After studying in Magdeburg, Zellerfeld, and Hildesheim, Telemann entered the University of Leipzig
University of Leipzig
to study law, but eventually settled on a career in music. He held important positions in Leipzig, Sorau, Eisenach, and Frankfurt
Frankfurt
before settling in Hamburg
Hamburg
in 1721, where he became musical director of the five main churches
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St. Matthew Passion
The St Matthew Passion
St Matthew Passion
(German: Matthäus-Passion), BWV 244, is a Passion, a sacred oratorio written by Johann Sebastian Bach
Johann Sebastian Bach
in 1727 for solo voices, double choir and double orchestra, with libretto by Picander. It sets chapters 26 and 27 of the Gospel of Matthew
Gospel of Matthew
(in the Luther Bible) to music, with interspersed chorales and arias. It is widely regarded as one of the masterpieces of classical sacred music. The original Latin title Passio Domini nostri J.C. secundum Evangelistam Matthæum translates to "The Passion of our Lord J[esus] C[hrist] according to the Evangelist Matthew".[1]Contents1 History1.1 Versions and contemporary performances1.1.1 First version (BWV 244b) 1.1.2 Funeral cantata for Köthen
Köthen
(BWV 244a) 1.1.3 Passion performances in the St
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Richard Toensing
Richard Toensing (March 11, 1940 - July 2, 2014) was an American composer and music educator.[1] He studied composition at St. Olaf College and the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, where he earned the Doctor of Musical Arts
Doctor of Musical Arts
degree in 1967. His most notable teachers include Ross Lee Finney and Leslie Bassett. After an initial appointment at Upsala College
Upsala College
in East Orange, New Jersey in 1966, Toensing joined the faculty of the University of Colorado at Boulder College of Music in 1972
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Judson Memorial Church
The Judson Memorial Church
Judson Memorial Church
is located on Washington Square South between Thompson Street and Sullivan Street, opposite Washington Square Park, in the Greenwich Village
Greenwich Village
neighborhood of the New York City borough of Manhattan
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Orchestra Of St. Luke's
The Orchestra
Orchestra
of St. Luke's (OSL) is an American chamber orchestra based in New York City. The orchestra performs at several venues in New York City, including Carnegie Hall, the Morgan Library & Museum, and the Brooklyn Museum. Its administrative base is the DiMenna Center for Classical Music in the Baryshnikov Arts Center
Baryshnikov Arts Center
at 450 West 37th Street in Manhattan's Hell's Kitchen neighborhood.[1]Contents1 History 2 Music Directors and Principal Conductors 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] The core of the orchestra is the St. Luke's Chamber Ensemble, which was founded in 1974 as an ensemble of 21 to 22 musicians. It is named for the Church of St. Luke in the Fields, Greenwich Village, in Manhattan, where the ensemble first performed. Michael Feldman, a music teacher in Manhattan, was the first de facto conductor of the ensemble. The larger Orchestra
Orchestra
of St
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Doubt (2008 Film)
Doubt
Doubt
is a 2008 American period drama film written and directed by John Patrick Shanley
John Patrick Shanley
based on his Pulitzer Prize-winning stage play Doubt: A Parable. Produced by Scott Rudin, the film takes place in a St. Nicholas school led by Sister Aloysius (Meryl Streep). Sister James (Amy Adams) tells Aloysius that Father Flynn (Philip Seymour Hoffman) might have too much personal attention with the school's only black student Donald Miller (Joseph Foster), thus leading to Aloysius starting a crusade against Flynn. The film also features Viola Davis as Donald Miller's mother, Mrs. Miller. The film premiered October 30, 2008 at the AFI Fest
AFI Fest
before being distributed by Miramax Films
Miramax Films
in limited release on December 12 and in wide release on December 25
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David W. Dunlap
David W. Dunlap is an American journalist who works as a reporter for The New York Times. He currently writes a regular column, Building Blocks, that looks at the New York metropolitan area
New York metropolitan area
through its architecture, infrastructure, spaces, and places.[1] He has extensively documented the rebuilding of the World Trade Center after the September 11 attacks
September 11 attacks
in 2001. He began writing about landmarks in 1981, when he was evicted from the New York Biltmore Hotel
New York Biltmore Hotel
so that he would not be able to see its interior being demolished.[2] He began his career as a clerk to James Reston in 1975, became a graphics editor in 1976, and then reporter in 1981. Between 1994 and 1999, Dunlap covered gay, lesbian, and AIDS
AIDS
issues for The New York Times
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International Standard Book Number
The International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a numeric commercial book identifier which is intended to be unique.[a][b] Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each separate edition and variation (except reprintings) of a publication. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book will each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is ten digits long if assigned before 2007, and thirteen digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007. The method of assigning an ISBN is nation-specific and varies between countries, often depending on how large the publishing industry is within a country. The initial ISBN identification format was devised in 1967, based upon the 9-digit Standard Book
Book
Numbering (SBN) created in 1966
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New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission
Coordinates: 40°42′47″N 74°00′14″W / 40.71295°N 74.00377°W / 40.71295; -74.00377The demolition of Pennsylvania Station was a key moment in the preservationist movement, which led to the creation of the CommissionThe New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission
New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission
(LPC) is the New York City agency charged with administering the city's Landmarks Preservation Law. The Commission was created in April 1965 by Mayor Robert F. Wagner, Jr.[1] following the destruction of Pennsylvania Station the previous year to make way for the construction of the current Madison Square Garden. The Commission is responsible for protecting New York City's architecturally, historically, and culturally significant buildings and sites by granting them landmark or historic district status, and regulating them once they're designated
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Gay Pride March (New York City)
The annual New York City
New York City
LGBT Pride March, or New York City
New York City
Pride March, traverses southward down Fifth Avenue
Fifth Avenue
and ends at Greenwich Village in Lower Manhattan. The New York City
New York City
Pride March rivals the Sao Paulo Gay Pride Parade
Sao Paulo Gay Pride Parade
as the largest pride parade in the world, attracting tens of thousands of participants and millions of sidewalk spectators each June.[4] The March passes by the site of the Stonewall Inn on Christopher Street, location of the 1969 police raid that launched the modern Gay
Gay
Rights
Rights
Movement.[5] The March, The Rally, Teaze (formerly Rapture on the River), PrideFest (the festival) and the Dance on the Pier are the main events of Pride Week in New York City
New York City
LGBT Pride Week
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Andrew Dolkart
Andrew Scott Dolkart is a professor of Historic Preservation
Historic Preservation
at the Columbia University
Columbia University
Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation (GSAPP) and Director of the school's Historic Preservation Program. Professor Dolkart is an authority on the preservation of historically significant architecture and an expert in the architecture and development of New York City. He was recently described as someone who is "without peer among New York's architectural researchers" by architectural critic Francis Morrone[1] and he has written extensively on this topic. Before joining the faculty at Columbia he held a position at the New York City
New York City
Landmarks Preservation Commission and worked as a consultant
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John Wiley & Sons
John Wiley & Sons, Inc., also referred to as Wiley (NYSE: JW.A), is a global publishing company that specializes in academic publishing. The company produces books, journals, and encyclopedias, in print and electronically, as well as online products and services,[3] training materials, and educational materials for undergraduate, graduate, and continuing education students.[4] Founded in 1807, Wiley is also known for publishing For Dummies. As of 2015, the company had 4,900 employees and a revenue of $1.8 billion.[1]Contents1 History1.1 High-growth and emerging markets 1.2 Strategic acquisition and divestiture2 Governance and operations 3 Brands and partnerships 4 Worldwide partnership with Christian H. Cooper 5 Current initiatives5.1 Higher education 5.2 Medicine 5.3 Architecture and design6 Wiley Online Library 7 Corporate culture 8 Apple controversy 9 Kirtsaeng v
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Federal Writers' Project
The Federal Writers' Project
Federal Writers' Project
(FWP) was a United States federal government project created to provide jobs for out-of-work writers during the Great Depression. It was part of the Works Progress Administration (WPA), a New Deal
New Deal
program. It was one of a group of New Deal arts programs known collectively as Federal Project Number One.Contents1 Background 2 American Guide Series
American Guide Series
and other publications 3 Ancillary projects 4 Controversies 5 Film 6 Notable participants 7 References 8 Further reading 9 External links9.1 Overview 9.2 Specific projectsBackground[edit]Poster for the Illinois Writers Project radio series Moments with Genius, presented by the Museum of Science and Industry (c
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