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Christopher Columbus (whaleback)
The SS Christopher Columbus
Christopher Columbus
was an American excursion liner on the Great Lakes, in service between 1893 and 1933. She was the only whaleback ship ever built for passenger service. The ship was designed by Alexander McDougall, the developer and promoter of the whaleback design.[1] Columbus was built between 1892 and 1893 at Superior, Wisconsin, by the American Steel Barge
Barge
Company. Initially, she ferried passengers to and from the World's Columbian Exposition
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Great Lakes
The Great Lakes
Great Lakes
(French: les Grands-Lacs), also called the Laurentian Great Lakes[1] and the Great Lakes
Great Lakes
of North America, are a series of interconnected freshwater lakes located primarily in the upper mid-east region of North America, on the Canada–United States border, which connect to the Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
through the Saint Lawrence River
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Jackson Park (Chicago)
Jackson Park is a 500-acre (2 km²) park on Chicago's South Side, located at 6401 South Stony Island Avenue in the Woodlawn community area. It extends into the South Shore and Hyde Park community areas, bordering Lake Michigan
Lake Michigan
and several South Side neighborhoods. Named for President Andrew Jackson, it is one of two Chicago
Chicago
Park District parks with the name "Jackson", the other being Mahalia Jackson
Mahalia Jackson
Park in the community area of Auburn Gresham on the far southwest side of Chicago. The parkland was first developed as the host site of the Chicago World's Fair in 1893, memorialized today by the Statue of The Republic. The Museum of Science and Industry resides in the remaining "palace" in the park from that era, and a Japanese garden traces its history to the fair. The park includes woodland trails, playing fields, a beach, golf course, and a boat harbor
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Propeller
A propeller is a type of fan that transmits power by converting rotational motion into thrust. A pressure difference is produced between the forward and rear surfaces of the airfoil-shaped blade, and a fluid (such as air or water) is accelerated behind the blade. Propeller
Propeller
dynamics, like those of aircraft wings, can be modelled by either or both Bernoulli's principle
Bernoulli's principle
and Newton's third law. A marine propeller of this type is sometimes colloquially known as a screw propeller or screw, however there is a different class of propellers known as cycloidal propellers – they are characterized by the higher propulsive efficiency averaging 0.72 compared to the screw propeller's average of 0.6 and the ability to throw thrust in any direction at any time
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Samuel F. Hodge & Co.
The Samuel F. Hodge & Co. was a manufacturer of marine engines in Detroit. Originally established in 1863 under the name of Cowie, Hodge & Co. In 1865, the firm became Hodge & Christie. In 1870, Mr. Hodge bought the interest of Mr. Christie and continued the business individually. In 1876, during the worst of the depression following the crash of 1873, Samuel F. Hodge built one of the most convenient manufacturing establishments in Detroit, S.F. Hodge & Company, equipping it with a plant second to none. In 1883 it was incorporated as the Samuel F. Hodge & Company. Samuel F. Hodge retained the presidency until his death.[1] They turned out 125 engines between 1884 and 1899. They built the first triple expansion engine to be used on the Great Lakes. It was placed in the Roumania on October 2, 1886.[2] Here also was built the engine for Capt. Hoyt, the first of Capt. Alexander Mc Dougall's whaleback steamers built at West Superior
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Detroit
Detroit
Detroit
(/dɪˈtrɔɪt/)[6] is the most populous city in the U.S. state of Michigan, the largest city on the United States–Canada border, and the seat of Wayne County. The municipality of Detroit
Detroit
had a 2016 estimated population of 672,795, making it the 23rd-most populous city in the United States. The metropolitan area, known as Metro Detroit, is home to 4.3 million people, making it the second-largest in the Midwest
Midwest
after Chicago. Detroit
Detroit
is a major port on the Detroit
Detroit
River, one of the four major straits that connect the Great Lakes
Great Lakes
system to the Saint Lawrence Seaway. The Detroit Metropolitan Airport
Detroit Metropolitan Airport
is among the most important hubs in the United States
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Michigan
Michigan
Michigan
(/ˈmɪʃɪɡən/ ( listen)) is a state in the Great Lakes
Great Lakes
and Midwestern regions of the United States. The state's name, Michigan, originates from the ( Ojibwe
Ojibwe
word) mishigamaa, meaning "large water" or "large lake".[3][7] Michigan
Michigan
is the tenth most populous of the 50 United States, with the 11th most extensive total area, and the largest state by total area east of the Mississippi
Mississippi
River.[b] Michigan's capital is Lansing, and its largest city is Detroit. Michigan
Michigan
is the only state to consist of two peninsulas. The Lower Peninsula, to which the name Michigan
Michigan
was originally applied, is often noted to be shaped like a mitten
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Scotch Boiler
A "Scotch" marine boiler (or simply Scotch boiler) is a design of steam boiler best known for its use on ships.Sectional diagram of a "wet back" boilerThe general layout is that of a squat horizontal cylinder. One or more large cylindrical furnaces are in the lower part of the boiler shell. Above this is a large number of small-diameter fire-tubes. Gases and smoke from the furnace pass to the back of the boiler, then return through the small tubes and up and out of the chimney. The ends of these multiple tubes are capped by a smokebox, outside the boiler shell.[1] The Scotch boiler is a fire-tube boiler, in that hot flue gases pass through tubes set within a tank of water. As such, it is a descendant of the earlier Lancashire boiler, and like the Lancashire it uses multiple separate furnaces to give greater heating area for a given furnace capacity
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Cleveland Shipbuilding Company
The American Ship Building Company was the dominant shipbuilder on the Great Lakes before the Second World War. It started as Cleveland Shipbuilding in Cleveland, Ohio[1] in 1888 and opened the yard in Lorain, Ohio in 1898. It changed its name to the American Ship Building Company in 1900, when it acquired Superior Shipbuilding, in Superior, Wisconsin; Toledo Shipbuilding, in Toledo, Ohio; and West Bay Shipbuilding, in West Bay City, Michigan. With the coming of World War I, the company also acquired Buffalo Dry Dock, in Buffalo, New York; Chicago Shipbuilding, in Chicago, Illinois; and Detroit Shipbuilding, in Wyandotte, Michigan
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Superstructure
A superstructure is an upward extension of an existing structure above a baseline. This term is applied to various kinds of physical structures such as buildings, bridges, or ships having the degree of freedom zero (in the terms of theory of machines). The word "superstructure" is a combination of the Latin
Latin
prefix, super (meaning above, in addition) with the Latin
Latin
stem word, structure (meaning to build or to heap up). In order to improve the response during earthquakes of buildings and bridges, the superstructure might be separated from its foundation by various civil engineering mechanisms or machinery
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Promenade Deck
The promenade deck is a deck found on several types of passenger ships and riverboats. It usually extends from bow to stern, on both sides, and includes areas open to the outside, resulting in a continuous outside walkway suitable for promenading, (i.e., walking) thus the name. On older passenger ships, the promenade deck was simply the top outside deck below the superstructure, and was enclosed by a railing. Lifeboats are typically kept on davits accessible from the promenade. On a Mississippi
Mississippi
riverboat, the promenade deck is the second deck, or floor, up from the waterline, above the main deck, and below the Texas deck. On modern cruise ships with superstructures as high and broad as the hull, the promenade deck is often largely enclosed, with railing-lined "cutouts" and wooden decking to recall the old days
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Rush Street Bridge
Chicago Avenue (800 North) Ohio St./Ontario St. (east/westbound) from/to Kennedy Expressway I-90 I-94South end 401 North at Kinzie/Water Streets (65 East)Rush Street is a one-way street in the Near North Side community area of Chicago in Cook County, Illinois, United States. The street, which starts at the Chicago River between Wabash and North Michigan Avenues, runs directly north until it slants on a diagonal as it crosses Chicago Avenue then it continues to Cedar and State Streets, making it slightly less than a mile long.[1] One lane also runs southbound from Ohio Street (600N) to Kinzie Street (400N) as part of a two-way street segment
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Chicago River
The Chicago
Chicago
River is a system of rivers and canals with a combined length of 156 miles (251 km)[1] that runs through the city of Chicago, including its center (the Chicago
Chicago
Loop).[2] Though not especially long, the river is notable for being a reason why Chicago became an important location, with the related Chicago
Chicago
Portage
Portage
being a link between the Great Lakes
Great Lakes
and the Mississippi Valley
Mississippi Valley
waterways and eventually the Gulf of Mexico. The River is also noteworthy for its natural and man-made history
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Duluth, Minnesota
Duluth /dəˈluːθ/ ( listen) is a major port city in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Minnesota
Minnesota
and the county seat of Saint Louis County. Duluth has a population of 86,293[5] and is the second-largest city on Lake Superior's shores; after Thunder Bay, Ontario, in Canada, it has the largest metropolitan area on the lake. The Duluth MSA had a population of 279,771 in 2010, the second-largest in Minnesota. Situated on the north shore of Lake Superior
Lake Superior
at the westernmost point of the Great Lakes, Duluth is accessible to oceangoing vessels from the Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
2,300 miles (3,700 km) away via the Great Lakes Waterway and the Saint Lawrence Seaway.[6] Duluth forms a metropolitan area with neighboring Superior, Wisconsin, called the Twin Ports
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US$
 United States  East Timor[2][Note 1]  Ecuador[3][Note 2]  El Salvador[4]  Federated States of Micronesia  Marshall Islands  Palau  Panama[Note 3]  Zimbabwe[Note 4]3 non-U.S
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Ship Commissioning
Ship commissioning
Ship commissioning
is the act or ceremony of placing a ship in active service, and may be regarded as a particular application of the general concepts and practices of project commissioning. The term is most commonly applied to the placing of a warship in active duty with its country's military forces. The ceremonies involved are often rooted in centuries old naval tradition. Ship naming and launching
Ship naming and launching
endow a ship hull with her identity, but many milestones remain before she is completed and considered ready to be designated a commissioned ship. The engineering plant, weapon and electronic systems, galley, and multitudinous other equipment required to transform the new hull into an operating and habitable warship are installed and tested
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