HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Christoph Mrongovius
Krzysztof Celestyn Mrongovius
Krzysztof Celestyn Mrongovius
(German: Christoph Cölestin Mrongovius; Polish: Krzysztof Celestyn Mrongowiusz) (July 19, 1764 – June 3, 1855) was a Protestant pastor, writer, philosopher, distinguished linguist, and translator. Mrongovius was a noted defender of the Polish language
Polish language
in Warmia
Warmia
and Mazury.Contents1 Biography 2 Works2.1 Detailed Polish–German dictionaries3 Bibliography 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] Mrongovius, son of Bartholomeus, was born in Hohenstein, Kingdom of Prussia (now Olsztynek
Olsztynek
in Poland). Mrongovius attended a school in Saalfeld, now (Zalewo)]], and then studied at the cathedral school in Königsberg. He matriculated on 21 March 1782 at Königsberg University
[...More...]

"Christoph Mrongovius" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Wayback Machine
The Wayback Machine
Wayback Machine
is a digital archive of the World Wide Web
World Wide Web
and other information on the Internet
Internet
created by the Internet
Internet
Archive, a nonprofit organization, based in San Francisco, California, United States.Contents1 History 2 Technical details2.1 Storage capabilities 2.2 Growth 2.3 Website exclusion policy2.3.1 Oakland Archive
Archive
Policy3 Uses3.1 In legal evidence3.1.1 Civil litigation3.1.1.1 Netbula LLC v. Chordiant Software Inc. 3.1.1.2 Telewizja Polska3.1.2 Patent law 3.1.3 Limitations of utility4 Legal status 5 Archived content legal issues5.1 Scientology 5.2 Healthcare Advocates, Inc. 5.3 Suzanne Shell 5.4 Daniel Davydiuk6 Censorship and other threats 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksHistory[edit]This section needs additional citations for verification
[...More...]

"Wayback Machine" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Szczecin
Szczecin
Szczecin
(/ˈʃtʃɛtʃɪn/; Polish: [ˈʂt͡ʂɛt͡ɕin] ( listen); German and Swedish: Stettin,[1] known also by other alternative names) is the capital and largest city of the West Pomeranian Voivodeship
West Pomeranian Voivodeship
in Poland. Located near the Baltic Sea
Baltic Sea
and the German border, it is a major seaport and Poland's seventh-largest city. As of June 2011, the population was 407,811.[2] Szczecin
Szczecin
is located on the Oder, south of the Szczecin Lagoon
Szczecin Lagoon
and the Bay of Pomerania. The city is situated along the southwestern shore of Dąbie Lake, on both sides of the Oder
Oder
and on several large islands between the western and eastern branches of the river
[...More...]

"Szczecin" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

East Prussia
East Prussia
Prussia
(German: Ostpreußen, pronounced [ˈɔstˌpʁɔʏsən] ( listen); Polish: Prusy Wschodnie; Lithuanian: Rytų Prūsija; Latin: Borussia orientalis; Russian: Восточная Пруссия) was a province of the Kingdom of Prussia
Prussia
from 1773 to 1829 and again from 1878 (with the Kingdom itself being part of the German Empire
German Empire
from 1871); following World War I
World War I
it formed part of the Weimar Republic's Free State of Prussia, until 1945. Its capital city was Königsberg
Königsberg
(present-day Kaliningrad). East Prussia
Prussia
was the main part of the region of Prussia
Prussia
along the southeastern Baltic Coast.[1] East Prussia
Prussia
enclosed the bulk of the ancestral lands of the Baltic Old Prussians
[...More...]

"East Prussia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Polish Culture
The culture of Poland
Poland
is closely connected with its intricate thousand-year history.[1] Its unique character developed as a result of its geography at the confluence of various European regions. With origins in the culture of the West Slavs, over time Polish culture has been profoundly influenced by its interweaving ties with the Germanic, Hungarian, Latinate
Latinate
and to a lesser extent; Byzantine and Ottoman worlds as well as in continual dialog with the many other ethnic groups and minorities living in Poland.[2] The people of Poland
Poland
have traditionally been seen as hospitable to artists from abroad and eager to follow cultural and artistic trends popular in other countries. In the 19th and 20th centuries the Polish focus on cultural advancement often took precedence over political and economic activity
[...More...]

"Polish Culture" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Partitions Of Poland
The Partitions of Poland[nb 1] were three partitions of the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth
Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth
that took place towards the end of the 18th century and ended the existence of the state, resulting in the elimination of sovereign Poland
Poland
and Lithuania
Lithuania
for 123 years. The partitions were conducted by Habsburg Austria, the Kingdom of Prussia, and the Russian Empire, which divided up the Commonwealth lands among themselves progressively in the process of territorial seizures and annexations.[1][2][3][4] The First Partition of Poland
Poland
was decided on August 5, 1772. Two decades later, Russian and Prussian troops entered the Commonwealth again and the Second Partition was signed on January 23, 1793. Austria did not participate in the Second Partition
[...More...]

"Partitions Of Poland" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth
The Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth, formally the Crown of the Kingdom of Poland
Poland
and the Grand Duchy of Lithuania, after 1791 the Commonwealth of Poland, was a dualistic state, a bi-confederation of Poland
Poland
and Lithuania
Lithuania
ruled by a common monarch, who was both the King of Poland
Poland
and the Grand Duke
Duke
of Lithuania. It was one of the largest[2][3] and most populous countries of 16th- and 17th-century Europe
[...More...]

"Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Slavic Peoples
Slavs
Slavs
are an Indo-European ethno-linguistic group who speak the various Slavic languages
Slavic languages
of the larger Balto-Slavic linguistic group. They are native to Eurasia, stretching from Central, Eastern, and Southeastern Europe
Europe
all the way north and westwards to Northeast Europe
Europe
, Northern Asia (Siberia), the Caucasus, and Central Asia (especially Kazakhstan
Kazakhstan
and Turkmenistan) as well as historically in Western Europe
Europe
(particularly in East Germany) and Western Asia (including Anatolia)
[...More...]

"Slavic Peoples" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Masuria
Masuria
Masuria
(Polish:  Mazury (help·info), German: Masuren, Masurian: Mazurÿ) is a region in northern Poland
Poland
famous for its 2,000 lakes. Before the end of World War II, it was mostly inhabited by Polish-speaking (Masurian dialect) Lutheran
Lutheran
Masurians
Masurians
and constituted a part of East Prussia. Masuria
Masuria
occupies much of the Masurian Lake District. Administratively, it belongs to Warmian-Masurian Voivodeship
[...More...]

"Masuria" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Anabasis (Xenophon)
Anabasis (/əˈnæbəsɪs/; Greek: Ἀνάβασις, Greek pronunciation: [anábasis] (literally an "expedition up from"))[1] is the most famous work, published in seven books, of the Greek professional soldier and writer Xenophon. The text was composed around the year 370 BC, and in translations, Anabasis is rendered The March of the Ten Thousand or The March Up Country
[...More...]

"Anabasis (Xenophon)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Society Of Friends Of Science In Warsaw
The Warsaw Society of Friends of Science (Polish: Towarzystwo Przyjaciół Nauk, TPN) was one of the earliest Polish scientific societies, active in Warsaw from 1800 to 1832.Contents1 Name 2 History 3 Influence 4 Notables 5 See also 6 Notes 7 References 8 External linksName[edit] The Society was also known as Warszawskie Królewskie Towarzystwo Przyjaciół Nauk (Warsaw Royal Society of Friends of Learning). Sometimes the word "Royal" was omitted. History[edit]Thorvaldsen's statue of Copernicus, erected in 1830 in front of the Staszic Palace (now headquarters of the Polish Academy of Sciences)Though the Society was founded in 1800, its traditions harked back to the Thursday dinners that had been held in the final decades of the 18th century by Poland's last king, Stanisław August Poniatowski.[1][2] From 1824 the Society was headquartered in the Staszic Palace (after its renovation in 1820–23), purchased for the Society by one of its most prominent
[...More...]

"Society Of Friends Of Science In Warsaw" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Warsaw
From top, left to right: Warsaw
Warsaw
Skyline Royal Baths Park Royal Route Staszic Palace
Staszic Palace
and Copernicus Monument
[...More...]

"Warsaw" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Paris
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Paris
Paris
(French pronunciation: ​[paʁi] ( listen)) is the capital and most populous city in France, with an administrative-limits area of 105 square kilometres (41 square miles) and an official population of 2,206,488 (2015).[5] The city is a commune and department, and the heart of the 12,012-square-kilometre (4
[...More...]

"Paris" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Giennadij Jerszow
Giennadij Jerszow (Gennadij Jerszow, Геннадій Олексійович Єршов) is a Polish–Ukrainian sculptor and feldsher. Jerszow was born on July 12, 1967 in Chernihiv, in Northern Ukraine in a mixed Polish–Ukrainian family.[1] As a repatriate he acquired Polish citizenship and his family moved in 2001 to Poland, where he currently resides in the city of Gdańsk.[1]Contents1 Awards 2 Gallery 3 References 4 External linksAwards[edit]Medal of Honor of primate Józef Cardinal Glemp – "PRO ARTE OPERA POLITISSIMA PERFECTO". Badge of Honor "Golden Jewel of the Mazepa family."Gallery[edit]Sculpture of Vaslav and Bronislava Nijinska by Giennadij Jerszow in the Grand Theatre in WarsawBust of Stanisław Moniuszko in the Stanisław Moniuszko Academy of Music in GdańskBust of Fryderyk Chopin in the Polish Baltic Philharmonic in GdańskStations of the Cross in St
[...More...]

"Giennadij Jerszow" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Order Of The Red Eagle
The Order of the Red Eagle
Order of the Red Eagle
(German: Roter Adlerorden) was an order of chivalry of the Kingdom of Prussia. It was awarded to both military personnel and civilians, to recognize valor in combat, excellence in military leadership, long and faithful service to the kingdom, or other achievements
[...More...]

"Order Of The Red Eagle" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Adam Kazimierz Czartoryski
Prince Adam Kazimierz Czartoryski
Czartoryski
(1 December 1734 – 19 March 1823) was an influential Polish[1] aristocrat, writer, literary and theater critic, linguist, traveller and statesman. He was a great patron of arts and a candidate for the Polish crown. He was educated in England and after his return to Poland
Poland
in 1758, he became a member of the Sejm (parliament), Crown General of Podolia
Podolia
and Marshal of General Confederation of Kingdom of Poland. The son of August Aleksander Czartoryski, governor of Ruthenia, who gathered a great estate and founded prosperous workshops, Adam Kazimierz was educated in England
England
and prepared to take over the Polish throne
[...More...]

"Adam Kazimierz Czartoryski" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.