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Christianity By Country
As of the year 2018, Christianity
Christianity
has more than 2.4 billion adherents, out of about 7.5 billion people.[1][2][3][4][a] The faith represents one-third of the world's population and is the largest religion in the world, with the three largest groups of Christians
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Christianity In Africa
Christianity
Christianity
in Africa
Africa
began in Egypt
Egypt
in the middle of the 1st century. By the end of the 2nd century it had reached the region around Carthage. Important Africans who influenced the early development of Christianity
Christianity
include Tertullian, Perpetua, Felicity, Clement of Alexandria, Origen
Origen
of Alexandria, Cyprian, Athanasius
Athanasius
and Augustine of Hippo. The spread of Islam
Islam
into North Africa
Africa
reduced the size of Christian congregations as well as their number, so that of the original churches, only the Coptic Church in Egypt, the Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo Church and the Eritrean Orthodox Tewahedo Church in the Horn of Africa
Africa
remain
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Christianity In Cambodia
Religion in Cambodia
Cambodia
(2010)[1]   Buddhism (97%)    Islam
Islam
(2.0%)   Folk religion (0.5%)   Christianity (0.4%)   Non religious (0.2%)Buddha at a temple in Ream, CambodiaBuddhism is the official religion of Cambodia
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Religion In Swaziland
Christianity
Christianity
is the dominant religion in Swaziland.[2] The relative prevalence percentage vary by source. According to Pew Research, over 88% of the total 1.2 million population of Swaziland
Swaziland
express Christianity
Christianity
to be their faith, over 10% express no affiliation.[1] According to the US State Department religious freedom report of 2012, local religious leaders estimate that 90% of Swaziland's population is Christian, 2% Muslim, while under 10% belong to other religious groups.[3] According to the CIA world fact book, the distribution is 40% Zionist, 20% Roman Catholic, Muslim 10%, other (includes Anglican, Baha'i, Methodist, Mormon, Jewish) 30%
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Christianity In Tanzania
The CIA World Factbook states that 30% of the population is Christian with Muslims being 35% and 35% practicing indigenous beliefs, though it is uncertain how up-to-date these figures are.[1] A 2010 Pew survey found 61.4 percent of respondents to be Christian, 35.2 percent to be Muslim, 1.8 percent to follow traditional African religions, 1.4 percent to be unaffiliated, and 0.1 percent to be Hindu.[2] A 2008-09 Pew survey found that 51 percent of Tanzanian Christians described themselves as Roman Catholic, and 44 percent described themselves as Protestant.[3]:page 22 Among Protestants, Lutherans (13 percent of Tanzanian Christians), Pentecostals (10 percent), Anglicans (10 percent), and adherents of African initiated churches (5 percent) dominate.[3]:page 23 The Orthodox Church
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Religion In Zambia
There is no scholarly consensus over what precisely constitutes a religion.[1][2] It may be defined as a cultural system of designated behaviors and practices, world views, texts, sanctified places, prophesies, ethics, or organizations, that relate humanity to the supernatural, transcendental, or spiritual. Different religions may or may not contain various elements ranging from the divine,[3] sacred things,[4] faith,[5] a supernatural being or supernatural beings[6] or "some sort of ultimacy and transcendence that will provide norms and power for the rest of life".[7] Religious practices may include rituals, sermons, commemoration or veneration (of deities), sacrifices, festivals, feasts, trances, initiations, funerary services, matrimonial services, meditation, prayer, music, art, dance, public service, or other aspects of human culture. Religions have sacred histories and narratives, which may be preserved in sacred scriptures, and symbols and holy places, that aim mostly to give a
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Christianity In Zimbabwe
Christianity is one of the major religions practiced in Zimbabwe. The arrival of Christianity dates back to the 14th century by missionaries such as Robert Moffat of the London Missionary Society
London Missionary Society
(LMS). Christianity is embraced by the majority of the population
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Christianity In Asia
Christianity
Christianity
in Asia
Asia
has its roots in the very inception of Christianity, which originated from the life and teachings of Jesus
Jesus
in 1st century Roman Palestine. Christianity
Christianity
then spread through the missionary work of his apostles, first in the Levant
Levant
and taking roots in the major cities such as Jerusalem
Jerusalem
and Antioch. According to tradition, further eastward expansion occurred via the preaching of Thomas the Apostle, who established Christianity
Christianity
in the Parthian Empire (Iran) and India. The very First Ecumenical Council
First Ecumenical Council
was held in the city of Nicaea
Nicaea
in Asia
Asia
Minor (325)
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Christianity In Afghanistan
The Islamic Republic of Afghanistan
Afghanistan
does not recognize any Afghan citizens as being Christians, nor are Afghan citizens legally permitted to convert to Christianity. Although there are no explicit laws that forbid proselytizing by non-Muslims, many authorities and most of society view its toleration as contrary to the practice of Islam.[1] There is only one legally recognized church building in Afghanistan, the Catholic chapel at the Italian Embassy, which is not open to Afghan nationals.[1] Muslims who change their faith to Christianity, are subject to societal and official pressure, which may lead to death, imprisonment or confiscation of property[2]
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Christianity In Bangladesh
The earliest recorded Christians in the territory of modern-day Bangladesh
Bangladesh
arrived during the Bengal Sultanate. Portuguese missionaries and traders in Porto Grande, Chittagong
Chittagong
built the region's first churches during the 16th century. The Jesuits opened their first mission in 1600. Mughal and colonial Dhaka
Dhaka
were home to Armenians, Greeks, Catholics and Anglicans.[citation needed] Islam is the majority religion in Bangladesh
Bangladesh
(89.1%), followed by Hinduism (10%)
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Christianity In Bhutan
The French Internet site "Aide à l'Eglise en détresse" (Aid to the Church in Need) puts the figure of Christians in Bhutan
Bhutan
at 12,255, with 1,000 Roman Catholics, making it a total of 0.9% of the population. The population also consists of 84% Buddhists, 11.4% Hindus, 3.4% Animists and 0.3% uncategorized.[1]Contents1 Origins 2 The 2008 Constitution 3 Christian communities3.1 Roman Catholics 3.2 Protestants4 Vajrayana
Vajrayana
Buddhism as state religion 5 Restrictions on the Christian faith5.1 Before 2008 5.2 After 20086 Proselytizing 7 Christian media 8 References 9 See alsoOrigins[edit] In 1627 two Pourtugese Jesuits, Fr. Estêvão Cacella
Estêvão Cacella
and Fr. João Cabral, traveling from Kochi
Kochi
and attempting to make a new route to the Jesuit mission in Shigatse, Tibet,[2] visited Bhutan
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Christianity In Brunei
Christianity in Brunei
Brunei
is the third largest religion practiced by about 10% of the population.[1]Contents1 Restrictions on religious freedom 2 Protestantism 3 Roman Catholic Church 4 ReferencesRestrictions on religious freedom[edit] Contact with Christians in other countries, the import of Bibles and public celebration of Christmas
Christmas
are banned by decree.[2] Christians in Brunei
Brunei
are not allowed to proselytise.[3] Schools are not allowed to teach Christianity.[3] If religious organisations fail to register, its members can be imprisoned.[3] Teaching of non-Muslim religions in schools is prohibited.[3] Marriages between Christians and Muslims are prohibited.[3] Brunei
Brunei
is the latest Muslim country to enact a law that makes apostasy a crime punishable with death. In 2013, it enacted Syariah (Sharia’a) Penal Code
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Christianity In Burma
Christianity in Burma
Christianity in Burma
has a history dating to the early 18th century. According to the 2014 census, Christianity is the country's second largest religion, practicing by 6.2% of the population,[1] primarily among the Kachin, Chin and Kayin, and Eurasians because of missionary work in their respective areas. About four-fifths of the country’s Christians are Protestants, in particular Baptists
Baptists
of the Myanmar Baptist
Baptist
Convention; Roman Catholics make up the remainder. Christians have faced some hostility or even persecution since the 1920s. Christians have not moved to the higher echelons of power. A small number of foreign organisations have been permitted to enter the country to conduct humanitarian works, such as World Vision
World Vision
following Cyclone Nargis
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Christianity In China
Christianity
Christianity
in China
China
appeared in the 7th century, during the Tang dynasty, but did not take root until it was reintroduced in the 16th century by Jesuit missionaries.[2] Today, it comprises Catholics, Protestants, Evangelicals and a small number of Orthodox Christians. Although its lineage in China
China
is not as ancient as Taoism, Mahayana Buddhism
Buddhism
or Confucianism, Christianity, through various ways, has been present in China
China
since at least the 7th century and has gained significant influence during the last 200 years.[3] The number of Chinese Christians has increased significantly since the easing of restrictions on religious activity during economic reforms in the late 1970s; Christians were four million before 1949 (three million Catholics and one million Protestants).[4] Accurate data on Chinese Christians is hard to access
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Christianity In South Africa
Christianity is the dominant religion in South Africa, with almost 80% of the population in 2001 professing to be Christian. No single denomination predominates, with mainstream Protestant
Protestant
churches, Pentecostal
Pentecostal
churches, African initiated churches, and the Catholic Church all having significant numbers of adherents
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Christianity In Hong Kong
Christianity has been in Hong Kong
Hong Kong
since 1841.[1] As of 2014, there were about 870,000 Christians in Hong Kong
Hong Kong
(11.8% of the total population), most of them are
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