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Christian Music
Christian music
Christian music
is music that has been written to express either personal or a communal belief regarding Christian life and faith. Common themes of Christian music
Christian music
include praise, worship, penitence, and lament, and its forms vary widely across the world. Like other forms of music the creation, performance, significance, and even the definition of Christian music
Christian music
varies according to culture and social context
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Spiritual Autobiography
Spiritual autobiography
Spiritual autobiography
is a genre of non-fiction prose that dominated Protestant
Protestant
writing during the seventeenth century, particularly in England, particularly that of dissenters. The narrative follows the believer from a state of damnation to a state of grace; the most famous example is perhaps John Bunyan's Grace Abounding
Grace Abounding
(1666). Because so many autobiographies were written, they began to fall into a predictable pattern. The "formula" began with a sinful youth, "followed by a gradual awakening of spiritual feelings and a sense of anxiety about the prospects for one's soul."[1] The person would repent, fall again into sin, repent, and sin again; such cycles could last for years. The Bible
Bible
was often a source of comfort or fear during this time
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Christian Novel
A Christian
Christian
novel is any novel that expounds and illustrates a Christian
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Ministry Of Jesus
In the Christian gospels, the ministry of Jesus
Jesus
begins with his baptism in the countryside of Roman Judea
Roman Judea
and Transjordan, near the river Jordan, and ends in Jerusalem, following the
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Christmas Music
Christmas
Christmas
music comprises a variety of genres of music normally performed or heard around the Christmas
Christmas
season. Music
Music
associated with Christmas
Christmas
may be purely instrumental, or in the case of many carols or songs may employ lyrics whose subject matter ranges from the nativity of Jesus
Jesus
Christ, to gift-giving and merrymaking, to cultural figures such as Santa Claus, among other topics
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History Of The Eastern Orthodox Church
The history of the Eastern Orthodox Church
Eastern Orthodox Church
is traced back to Jesus Christ and the Apostles. The Apostles
Apostles
appointed successors, known as bishops, and they in turn appointed other bishops in a process known as Apostolic succession. Over time, five Patriarchates
Patriarchates
were established to organize the Christian
Christian
world, and four of these ancient Patriarchates
Patriarchates
remain Orthodox today
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Christian Science Fiction
Christian
Christian
science fiction is a subgenre of both Christian
Christian
literature and science fiction, in which there are strong Christian
Christian
themes, or which are written from a Christian
Christian
point of view.[1] These themes may be subtle, expressed by way of analogy, or more explicit.[2] Major influences include early science fiction authors such as C. S. Lewis, while more recent figures include Stephen Lawhead
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List Of Roman Catholic Cleric-scientists
This is a list of Catholic
Catholic
churchmen[1] throughout history who have made contributions to science. These churchmen-scientists include Nicolaus Copernicus, Gregor Mendel, Georges Lemaître, Albertus Magnus, Roger Bacon, Pierre Gassendi, Roger Joseph Boscovich, Marin Mersenne, Bernard Bolzano, Francesco Maria Grimaldi, Nicole Oresme, Jean Buridan, Robert Grosseteste, Christopher Clavius, Nicolas Steno, Athanasius Kircher, Giovanni Battista Riccioli, William of Ockham, and others listed below. The Catholic
Catholic
Church has also produced many lay scientists and mathematicians. The Jesuits
Jesuits
in particular have made numerous significant contributions to the development of science
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Early Christian Art
Early Christian
Christian
art and architecture or Paleochristian art is the art produced by Christians or under Christian
Christian
patronage from the earliest period of Christianity
Christianity
to, depending on the definition used, sometime between 260 and 525. In practice, identifiably Christian
Christian
art only survives from the 2nd century onwards.[1] After 550 at the latest, Christian
Christian
art is classified as Byzantine, or of some other regional type.[2] It is hard to know when distinctly Christian
Christian
art began. Prior to 100, Christians may have been constrained by their position as a persecuted group from producing durable works of art
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Christian Icons
An icon (from Greek εἰκών eikōn "image") is a religious work of art, most commonly a painting, from the Eastern Orthodox Church, Oriental Orthodoxy, and certain Eastern Catholic
Eastern Catholic
churches. The most common subjects include Christ, Mary, saints and/or angels. Though especially associated with "portrait" style images concentrating on one or two main figures, the term also covers most religious images in a variety of artistic media produced by Eastern Christianity, including narrative scenes. Icons may also be cast in metal, carved in stone, embroidered on cloth, painted on wood, done in mosaic or fresco work, printed on paper or metal, etc
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Christian Architecture
Church architecture
Church architecture
refers to the architecture of buildings of Christian churches. It has evolved over the two thousand years of the Christian religion, partly by innovation and partly by imitating other architectural styles as well as responding to changing beliefs, practices and local traditions. From the birth of Christianity
Christianity
to the present, the most significant objects of transformation for Christian architecture and design were the great churches of Byzantium, the Romanesque abbey churches, Gothic cathedrals and Renaissance basilicas with its emphasis on harmony. These large, often ornate and architecturally prestigious buildings were dominant features of the towns and countryside in which they stood. However, far more numerous were the parish churches in Christendom, the focus of Christian devotion in every town and village
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Byzantine Culture
The Byzantine
Byzantine
Empire, also referred to as the Eastern Roman Empire, was the continuation of the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
in the East during Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages, when its capital city was Constantinople
Constantinople
(modern-day Istanbul, which had been founded as Byzantium). It survived the fragmentation and fall of the Western Roman Empire
Roman Empire
in the 5th century AD and continued to exist for an additional thousand years until it fell to the Ottoman Turks in 1453.[2] During most of its existence, the empire was the most powerful economic, cultural, and military force in Europe
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American Catholic Literature
American Catholic literature emerged in the early 1900s as its own genre.[1] Catholic literature is not exclusively literature written by Catholic authors or about Catholic things, but rather Catholic literature is “defined… by a particular Catholic perspective applied to its subject matter.”[2] Beginning of Catholic publications[edit] In the years after the American Civil War, there was a young priest by the name of Fr. Isaac Hecker. A convert to the Catholic faith, he went around giving lectures with the aim of evangelizing the Catholic faith to both Catholics and non-Catholics alike. In 1865, Fr
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Bible Fiction
The term Bible
Bible
fiction refers to works of fiction which use characters, settings and events taken from the Bible. The degree of fictionalization in these works varies and, although they are often written by Christians or Jews, this is not always the case. Originally, these novels were consistent with true belief in the historicity of the Bible's narrative, replete with miracles, and God's explicit presence. Some of these works have been important and influential, and eventually there have appeared heterodox Bible
Bible
novels that reflect modern, postmodern or realist influences and themes. An early Bible
Bible
novel that may still be the most influential is Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ by Lew Wallace, and published by Harper & Brothers on November 12, 1880
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List Of Christian Thinkers In Science
A Christian
Christian
(/ˈkrɪstʃən, -tiən/ ( listen)) is a person who follows or adheres to Christianity, an Abrahamic, monotheistic religion based on the life and teachings of Jesus
Jesus
Christ
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Jesus In Christianity
In Christianity, Jesus
Jesus
is believed to be the Messiah
Messiah
(Christ) and through his crucifixion and resurrection, humans can be reconciled to God and thereby are offered salvation and the promise of eternal life.[2] These teachings emphasize that as the willing Lamb of God, Jesus
Jesus
chose to suffer on the cross at Calvary
Calvary
as a sign of his full obedience to the will of God the Father, as an "agent and servant of God".[3][4] The choice Jesus
Jesus
made thus counter-positions him as a new man of morality and obedience, in contrast to Adam's disobedience.[5] Christians believe that Jesus
Jesus
was both human and divine—the Son of God
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