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Christian Denominations
A Christian denomination
Christian denomination
is a distinct religious body within Christianity, identified by traits such as a name, organisation, leadership and doctrine. Individual bodies, however, may use alternative terms to describe themselves, such as church or sometimes fellowship. Divisions between one group and another are defined by authority and doctrine; issues such as the nature of Jesus, the authority of apostolic succession, eschatology, and papal primacy may separate one denomination from another. Groups of denominations—often sharing broadly similar beliefs, practices, and historical ties—are sometimes known as "branches of Christianity". Individual Christian groups vary widely in the degree to which they recognize one another. Several groups claim to be the direct and sole authentic successor of the church founded by Jesus
Jesus
Christ in the 1st century AD
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Liturgical Year
The liturgical year, also known as the church year or Christian year, as well as the kalendar,[1] consists of the cycle of liturgical seasons in Christian churches that determines when feast days, including celebrations of saints, are to be observed, and which portions of Scripture
Scripture
are to be read either in an annual cycle or in a cycle of several years. Distinct liturgical colours may appear in connection with different seasons of the liturgical year
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Martin Luther
Martin Luther, O.S.A. (/ˈluːθər/;[1] German: [ˈmaɐ̯tiːn ˈlʊtɐ] ( listen); 10 November 1483[2] – 18 February 1546) was a German professor of theology, composer, priest, monk,[3] and a seminal figure in the Protestant Reformation. Luther came to reject several teachings and practices of the Roman Catholic Church. He strongly disputed the Catholic view on indulgences. Luther proposed an academic discussion of the practice and efficacy of indulgences in his Ninety-five Theses
Ninety-five Theses
of 1517
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East–West Schism
The East–West Schism, also called the Great Schism
Schism
and the Schism
Schism
of 1054, was the break of communion between what are now the Roman
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Crusades
After 1291Smyrniote 1343–1351 Alexandrian 1365 Savoyard 1366 Barbary 1390 Nicopolis 1396 Varna
Varna
1443 Portuguese 1481 Northern Crusades
Northern Crusades
(1147–1410)Wendish 1147 Swedish1150 1249 1293Livonian 1198–1290 Prussian 1217–1274 Lithuan
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Ministry Of Jesus
In the Christian gospels, the ministry of Jesus
Jesus
begins with his baptism in the countryside of Roman Judea
Roman Judea
and Transjordan, near the river Jordan, and ends in Jerusalem, following the
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Christian Art
Christian art
Christian art
is sacred art which uses themes and imagery from Christianity. Most Christian groups use or have used art to some extent, although some have had strong objections to some forms of religious image, and there have been major periods of iconoclasm within Christianity. Images of Jesus
Jesus
and narrative scenes from the Life of Christ are the most common subjects, and scenes from the Old Testament
Old Testament
play a part in the art of most denominations. Images of the Virgin Mary and saints are much rarer in Protestant art than that of Roman Catholicism and Eastern Orthodoxy. Christianity
Christianity
makes far wider use of images than related religions, in which figurative representations are forbidden, such as Islam and Judaism
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Radical Reformation
The Radical Reformation
Reformation
was the response to what was believed to be the corruption in both the Roman Catholic Church
Catholic Church
and the expanding Magisterial Protestant movement led by Martin Luther
Martin Luther
and many others. Beginning in Germany and Switzerland in the 16th century, the Radical Reformation
Reformation
gave birth to many radical Protestant groups throughout Europe
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Constantine The Great
Constantine the Great
Constantine the Great
(Latin: Flavius Valerius Aurelius Constantinus Augustus;[2] Greek: Κωνσταντῖνος ὁ Μέγας; 27 February c. 272 AD[1] – 22 May 337 AD), also known as Constantine I or Saint Constantine, in the Orthodox Church
Orthodox Church
as Saint Constantine the Great, Equal-to-the-Apostles,[3] was a Roman Emperor of Illyrian and Greek origin from 306 to 337 AD. He was the son of Flavius Valerius Constantius, a Roman Army
Roman Army
officer, and his consort Helena. His father became Caesar, the deputy emperor in the west, in 293 AD. Constantine was sent east, where he rose through the ranks to become a military tribune under Emperors Diocletian
Diocletian
and Galerius
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Pneumatology (Christianity)
Pneumatology in Christianity
Christianity
refers to a particular discipline within Christian theology
Christian theology
that focuses on the study of the Holy Spirit. The term is essentially derived from the Greek word Pneuma (πνεῦμα), which designates "breath" or "spirit" and metaphorically describes a non-material being or influence. The English term pneumatology comes from two Greek words: πνευμα (pneuma, spirit) and λογος (logos, teaching about)
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History Of Christianity
The history of Christianity
Christianity
concerns the Christian religion, Christendom, and the Church with its various denominations, from the 1st century to the present. Roman Catholic
Roman Catholic
and Eastern Orthodox Christianity
Christianity
spread to all of Europe in the Middle Ages. Christianity
Christianity
expanded throughout the world and became the world's largest religion due to European colonialism.[1] Today there are more than two billion Christians worldwide.[2]Contents1 Early Christianity
Christianity
(c
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Christian Tradition
Christian tradition is a collection of traditions consisting of practices or beliefs associated with Christianity. These ecclesiastical traditions have more or less authority based on the nature of the practices or beliefs and on the group in question. Many churches have traditional practices, such as particular patterns of worship or rites, that developed over time. Deviations from such patterns are sometimes considered unacceptable or heretical. Similarly, traditions can be stories or history that are or were widely accepted without being part of Christian doctrine, e.g., the crucifixion of Saint Peter
Saint Peter
or the evangelistic activity of Thomas the Apostle in India, which are widely believed to have happened but are not recorded in scripture
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Apostles
In Christian theology
Christian theology
and ecclesiology, the apostles (Greek: ἀπόστολος, translit. apóstolos, lit. 'one who is sent away'), particularly the Twelve Apostles
Twelve Apostles
(also known as the Twelve Disciples or simply the Twelve), were the primary disciples of Jesus, the central figure in Christianity. During the life and ministry of Jesus
Jesus
in the 1st century AD, the apostles were his closest followers and became the primary teachers of the gospel message of Jesus. The word disciple is sometimes used interchangeably with apostle; for instance, the Gospel of John
Gospel of John
makes no distinction between the two terms[citation needed]. In modern usage, prominent missionaries are often called apostles, a practice which stems from the Latin
Latin
equivalent of apostle, i.e. missio, the source of the English word missionary
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Christian Apologetics
Christian apologetics
Christian apologetics
(Greek: ἀπολογία, "verbal defence, speech in defence")[1] is a branch of Christian theology
Christian theology
that aims to present historical, reasoned, and evidential bases for Christianity, defending it against objections.[2] Christian apologetics
Christian apologetics
have taken many forms over the centuries, starting with Paul the Apostle
Paul the Apostle
in the early church and Patristic writers such as Origen, Augustine of Hippo, Justin Martyr
Justin Martyr
and Tertullian, then continuing with writers such as Thomas Aquinas
Thomas Aquinas
and Anselm of Canterbury
Anselm of Canterbury
during Scholasticism
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Mary, Mother Of Jesus
Mary (Greek: Μαρία, translit. María; Aramaic: ܡܪܝܡ‎, translit. Mariam; Hebrew: מִרְיָם‎, translit. Miriam; Coptic: Ⲙⲁⲣⲓⲁ; Arabic: مريم‎, translit. Maryam), also known by various titles, styles and honorifics, was a 1st-century BC Galilean Jewish[2] woman of Nazareth, and the mother of Jesus, according to the New Testament[3][4][5][6] and the Quran.[7][8] The gospels of Matthew and Luke in the New Testament
New Testament
and the Quran describe Mary as a virgin (Greek: παρθένος, translit. parthénos)[9] and many[which?] Christians believe that she conceived her son while a virgin by the Holy Spirit
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God The Son
God the Son
God the Son
(Greek: Θεός ὁ υἱός) is the second person, of the Trinity
Trinity
in Christian theology. The doctrine of the Trinity identifies Jesus
Jesus
as the metaphysical embodiment of God the Son, united in essence (consubstantial) but distinct in person with regard to God the Father and God the Holy Spirit (the first and third persons of the Trinity). In these teachings, God the Son
God the Son
pre-existed before incarnation, is co-eternal with God the Father
God the Father
(and the Holy Spirit), both before Creation and after the End (see Eschatology)
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