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Christ Pantocrator
In Christian iconography, Christ Pantocrator
Christ Pantocrator
is a specific depiction of Christ. Pantocrator or Pantokrator (Greek: Χριστὸς Παντοκράτωρ)[1] is, used in this context, a translation of one of many names of God
God
in Judaism. When the Hebrew Bible
Hebrew Bible
was translated into Greek as the Septuagint, Pantokrator was used both for YHWH Sabaoth "Lord of Hosts"[2] and for El Shaddai " God
God
Almighty".[3] In the New Testament, Pantokrator is used once by Paul (2 Cor 6:18) and nine times in the Book of Revelation: 1:8, 4:8, 11:17, 15:3, 16:7, 16:14, 19:6, 19:15, and 21:22
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Chi (letter)
Chi (uppercase Χ, lowercase χ; Greek: χῖ) is the 22nd letter of the Greek alphabet, pronounced /kaɪ/ or /kiː/ in English.Contents1 Greek1.1 Pronunciation1.1.1 Ancient Greek 1.1.2 Koine Greek 1.1.3 Modern Greek1.2 Transliteration 1.3 Greek numeral 1.4 Xi2 Cyrillic 3 International Phonetic Alphabet 4 Chiasmus 5 Symbolism 6 Character encodings6.1 Greek chi 6.2 Coptic khi 6.3 Latin
Latin
chi 6.4 Mathematical chi7 Math and science 8 See also 9 ReferencesGreekThe
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Iconoclasm
Iconoclasm[Note 1] is the social belief in the importance of the destruction of icons and other images or monuments, most frequently for religious or political reasons. Over time, the word, usually in the adjectival form, has also come to refer to aggressive statements or actions against any well-established status quo. It is a frequent component of major political or religious changes
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Apse
In architecture, an apse (plural apses; from Latin
Latin
absis: "arch, vault" from Greek ἀψίς apsis "arch"; sometimes written apsis, plural apsides) is a semicircular recess covered with a hemispherical vault or semi-dome, also known as an Exedra. In Byzantine, Romanesque, and Gothic Christian church (including cathedral and abbey) architecture, the term is applied to a semi-circular or polygonal termination of the main building at the liturgical east end (where the altar is), regardless of the shape of the roof, which may be flat, sloping, domed, or hemispherical
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Nave
The nave /neɪv/ is the central aisle of a basilica church, or the main body of a church (whether aisled or not) between its rear wall and the far end of its intersection with the transept at the chancel. It is the zone of a church accessible by the laity.[1]Contents1 Description 2 Etymology 3 History 4 Record-holders 5 See also 6 ReferencesDescription[edit] The nave extends from the entry—which may have a separate vestibule (the narthex)—to the chancel and may be flanked by lower side-aisles[2] separated from the nave by an arcade. If the aisles are high and of a width comparable to the central nave, the structure is sometimes said to have three naves. It provides the central approach to the high altar. Etymology[edit] The term nave is from navis, the Latin
Latin
word for ship, an early Christian symbol.[3][4] The term may also have been suggested by the keel shape of the vaulting of a church
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Statue Of Zeus At Olympia
Coordinates: 37°38′16.3″N 21°37′48″E / 37.637861°N 21.63000°E / 37.637861; 21.63000Olympian Zeus
Zeus
in the sculptured antique art of Quatremère de Quincy (1815).A fanciful reconstruction of Phidias' statue of Zeus, in an engraving made by Philippe Galle
Philippe Galle
in 1572, from a drawing by Maarten van HeemskerckThe Statue
Statue
of Zeus
Zeus
at Olympia was a giant seated figure, about 13 m (43 ft) tall,[1] made by the Greek sculptor Phidias around 435 BC at the sanctuary of Olympia, Greece, and erected in the Temple of Zeus
Zeus
there. A sculpture of ivory plates and gold panels over a wooden framework, it represented the god Zeus
Zeus
sitting on an elaborate cedar wood throne ornamented with ebony, ivory, gold and precious stones
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Blessing
In religion, a blessing (also used to refer to bestowing of such) is the infusion of something with holiness, spiritual redemption, or divine will.Contents1 Etymology and Germanic paganism 2 Abrahamic religions2.1 Judaism 2.2 Christianity 2.3 Islam3 Hinduism 4 Other uses 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksEtymology and Germanic paganism[edit] The modern English language term bless likely derives from the 1225 term blessen, which developed from the Old English
Old English
blǣdsian (preserved in the Northumbrian dialect around 950 AD).[1] The term also appears in other forms, such as blēdsian (before
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Middle Ages
In the history of Europe, the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
(or Medieval Period) lasted from the 5th to the 15th century. It began with the fall of the Western Roman Empire
Roman Empire
and merged into the Renaissance
Renaissance
and the Age of Discovery. The Middle Ages
Middle Ages
is the middle period of the three traditional divisions of Western history: classical antiquity, the medieval period, and the modern period. The medieval period is itself subdivided into the Early, High, and Late Middle Ages. Population decline, counterurbanisation, invasion, and movement of peoples, which had begun in Late Antiquity, continued in the Early Middle Ages. The large-scale movements of the Migration Period, including various Germanic peoples, formed new kingdoms in what remained of the Western Roman Empire
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Mandorla
A mandorla is an aureola, or frame, usually in the shape of a vesica piscis, which surrounds the figures of Christ and the Virgin Mary in traditional Christian art.[1] It is distinguished from a halo in that it encircles the entire body, and not just the head. It is commonly used to frame the figure of Christ in Majesty
Christ in Majesty
in early medieval and Romanesque art, as well as Byzantine art
Byzantine art
of the same periods. Depictions[edit] The term mandorla, from the Italian language
Italian language
name for the "almond" nut, refers to the usual shape. Sometimes however, especially in earlier depictions, the mandorla takes circular or elliptical forms. Sometimes, also usually in earlier forms, the mandorla is shown as the intersection of two circles
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Four Evangelists
In Christian tradition, the Four Evangelists
Four Evangelists
are Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John, the authors attributed with the creation of the four Gospel accounts in the New Testament
New Testament
that bear the following titles: Gospel according to Matthew; Gospel
Gospel
according to Mark; Gospel
Gospel
according to Luke and Gospel
Gospel
according to John.Contents1 Gospels 2 Symbols 3 Naming 4 Depictions 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksGospels[edit]The four winged creatures that symbolise the Four Evangelists
Four Evangelists
surround Christ in Majesty
Christ in Majesty
on the Romanesque tympanum of the Church of St. Trophime in Arles.The lion symbol of St. Mark
St

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Sinai Peninsula
The Sinai Peninsula or simply Sinai (/ˈsaɪnaɪ/;[1][2] Arabic: سِينَاء‎ Sīnāʼ ; Egyptian Arabic: سينا‎ Sīna, IPA: [ˈsiːnæ]; Classical Syriac: ܣܝܢܝ‎, Hebrew: סִינַי‬ Sinai) is a peninsula in Egypt, the only part of the country located in Asia. It is situated between the Mediterranean Sea to the north and the Red Sea to the south, and is a land bridge between Asia and Africa. Sinai has a land area of about 60,000 km2 (23,000 sq mi) and a population of approximately 1,400,000 people. Administratively, the Sinai Peninsula is divided into two governorates: the South Sinai Governorate and the North Sinai Governorate. Three other governorates span the Suez Canal, crossing into African Egypt: Suez Governorate on the southern end of the Suez Canal, Ismailia Governorate in the center, and Port Said Governorate in the north. The Sinai Peninsula has been a part of Egypt from the First Dynasty of ancient Egypt (c. 3100 BC)
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Genitive
In grammar, genitive (abbreviated gen;[1] also called the second case) is the grammatical case that marks a noun as modifying another noun. It often marks a noun as being the possessor of another noun.[2] However, it can also indicate various relationships other than possession: certain verbs may take arguments in the genitive case, and it may have adverbial uses (see Adverbial genitive). Placing the modifying noun in the genitive case is one way to indicate that two nouns are related in a genitive construction. Modern English typically does not morphologically mark nouns for a genitive case in order to indicate a genitive construction; instead, it uses either the 's clitic or a preposition (usually of). However, the personal pronouns do have distinct possessive forms. There are various other ways to indicate a genitive construction, as well
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Constantinople
Κωνσταντινούπολις (in Greek) Constantinopolis (in Latin)Map of ConstantinopleShown within Asia
Asia
MinorAlternate name Byzantion (earlier Greek name), Miklagard/Miklagarth (Old Norse), Tsarigrad (Slavic), Basileuousa ("Queen of Cities"), Megalopolis ("the Great City")Location Istanbul, Istanbul
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Semi-dome
A semi-dome, also called a "half-dome", is the term in architecture for half a dome ("cut" vertically), used to cover a semi-circular area.[1] Similar structures occur in nature.Contents1 Architecture 2 Gallery 3 Notes 4 ReferencesArchitecture[edit] Semi-domes are a common feature of apses in Ancient Roman and traditional church architecture, and mosques and iwans in Islamic architecture. A semi-dome, or the whole apse, may also be called a conch after the scallop shell often carved as decoration of the semi-dome (all shells were conches in Ancient Greek), though this is usually used for subsidiary semi-domes, rather than the one over the main apse.[2] Small semi-domes have been often decorated in a shell shape from ancient times,[3] as in Piero della Francesca's Throned Madonna with saints and Federigo da Montefeltro,[4] and the example in the gallery below
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Cross
A cross is a geometrical figure consisting of two intersecting lines or bars, usually perpendicular to each other. The lines usually run vertically and horizontally. A cross of oblique lines, in the shape of the Latin letter X, is also termed a saltire in heraldic terminology.Contents1 Name 2 History2.1 Pre-Christian 2.2 Christian cross3 Cross-like marks and graphemes 4 Cross-like emblems 5 Notable formations known as "cross" 6 Physical gestures 7 See also 8 References8.1 Notes 8.2 Sources9 External linksName[edit] The word cross is recorded in 10th-century Old English
Old English
as cros, exclusively for the instrument of Christ's crucifixion, replacing the native Old English
Old English
word rood. The word's history is complicated; it appears to have entered English from Old Irish, possibly via Old Norse, ultimately from the Latin crux (or its accusative crucem and its genitive crucis), "stake, cross"
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Gospel
Gospel
Gospel
is the Old English translation of Greek εὐαγγέλιον, evangelion, meaning "good news".[1] It originally meant the Christian message itself, but in the 2nd century it came to be used for the books in which the message was set out.[2][Notes 1] The four gospels of the New Testament
New Testamen

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