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Chow Mein
Chow mein
Chow mein
(/ˈtʃaʊ ˈmeɪn/) and (/ˈtʃaʊ ˈmiːn/)[1] are stir-fried noodles, the name being the romanization of the Taishanese chāu-mèing.[2][better source needed] The dish is popular throughout the Chinese diaspora
Chinese diaspora
and appears on the menus of most Chinese restaurants.[3] It is particularly popular in India[4], Nepal[5], the UK[6] and the US[7].Contents1 Etymology 2 Regional cuisine2.1 American Chinese cuisine 2.2 Australian Chinese cuisine 2.3 Brazilian Japanese cuisine 2.4 Canadian Chinese cuisine 2.5 Caribbean
Caribbean
Chinese cuisine 2.6 Indian Chinese cuisine 2.7 Nepalese Chinese cuisine 2.8 Peruvian Chinese cuisine3 See also 4 ReferencesEtymology[edit] The words chow mein mean 'stir-fried noodles', chow meaning 'stir-fried' and mein meaning 'noodles'
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China
China, officially the People's Republic
People's Republic
of China
China
(PRC), is a unitary sovereign state in East Asia
East Asia
and the world's most populous country, with a population of around 1.404 billion.[13] Covering approximately 9,600,000 square kilometers (3,700,000 sq mi), it is the third- or fourth-largest country by total area,[k][19] depending on the source consulted. China
China
also has the most neighbor countries in the world
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Fall River, Massachusetts
Fall River is a city in Bristol County, Massachusetts, United States. Fall River's population was 87,103 at the 2010 census,[6] making it the tenth-largest city in the state. Located along the eastern shore of Mount Hope Bay
Mount Hope Bay
at the mouth of the Taunton River, the city became famous during the 19th century as the leading textile manufacturing center in the United States. While the textile industry has long since moved on, its impact on the city's culture and landscape remains to this day. Fall River's official motto is "We'll Try," dating back to the aftermath of the Great Fire of 1843. It is also nicknamed "the Scholarship City" because Dr. Irving Fradkin founded Dollars for Scholars here in 1958
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Onion
The onion ( Allium
Allium
cepa L., from Latin cepa "onion"), also known as the bulb onion or common onion, is a vegetable that is the most widely cultivated species of the genus Allium. Its close relatives include the garlic, shallot, leek, chive,[2] and Chinese onion.[3] This genus also contains several other species variously referred to as onions and cultivated for food, such as the Japanese bunching onion ( Allium
Allium
fistulosum), the tree onion (A. ×proliferum), and the Canada onion ( Allium
Allium
canadense). The name "wild onion" is applied to a number of Allium
Allium
species, but A. cepa is exclusively known from cultivation
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Celery
Celery
Celery
( Apium
Apium
graveolens) is a marshland plant in the family Apiaceae that has been cultivated as a vegetable since antiquity. Celery
Celery
has a long fibrous stalk tapering into leaves. Depending on location and cultivar, either its stalks, leaves, or hypocotyl are eaten and used in cooking
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Restaurant
A restaurant (/ˈrɛstərənt/ or /ˈrɛstərɒnt/; French: [ʀɛs.to.ʁɑ̃] ( listen)), or an eatery, is a business which prepares and serves food and drinks to customers in exchange for money. Meals are generally served and eaten on the premises, but many restaurants also offer take-out and food delivery services, and some offer only take-out and delivery. Restaurants vary greatly in appearance and offerings, including a wide variety of cuisines and service models ranging from inexpensive fast food restaurants and cafeterias to mid-priced family restaurants, to high-priced luxury establishments. In Western countries, most mid- to high-range restaurants serve alcoholic beverages such as beer and wine
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Carrot
The carrot ( Daucus
Daucus
carota subsp. sativus) is a root vegetable, usually orange in colour, though purple, black, red, white, and yellow cultivars exist.[1] Carrots are a domesticated form of the wild carrot, Daucus
Daucus
carota, native to Europe and southwestern Asia. The plant probably originated in Persia and was originally cultivated for its leaves and seeds. The most commonly eaten part of the plant is the taproot, although the greens are sometimes eaten as well. The domestic carrot has been selectively bred for its greatly enlarged, more palatable, less woody-textured taproot. The carrot is a biennial plant in the umbellifer family Apiaceae. At first, it grows a rosette of leaves while building up the enlarged taproot. Fast-growing cultivars mature within three months (90 days) of sowing the seed, while slower-maturing cultivars are harvested four months later (120 days)
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Cabbage
Cabbage
Cabbage
or headed cabbage (comprising several cultivars of Brassica oleracea) is a leafy green, red (purple), or white (pale green) biennial plant grown as an annual vegetable crop for its dense-leaved heads. It is descended from the wild cabbage, B. oleracea var. oleracea, and belongs to the "cole crops", meaning it is closely related to broccoli and cauliflower (var. botrytis); Brussels sprouts (var. gemmifera); and savoy cabbage (var. sabauda). Brassica rapa
Brassica rapa
is commonly named Chinese, celery or napa cabbage and has many of the same uses. Cabbage
Cabbage
heads generally range from 0.5 to 4 kilograms (1 to 9 lb), and can be green, purple or white. Smooth-leafed, firm-headed green cabbages are the most common. Smooth-leafed purple cabbages and crinkle-leafed savoy cabbages of both colors are more rare. It is a multi-layered vegetable
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Star Tribune
The Star Tribune
Star Tribune
is the largest newspaper in Minnesota. It originated as the Minneapolis
Minneapolis
Tribune in 1867 and the competing Minneapolis
Minneapolis
Daily Star in 1920. During the 1930s and 1940s Minneapolis's competing newspapers were consolidated, with the Tribune published in the morning and the Star in the evening. They merged in 1982, creating the Star Tribune. After a tumultuous period in which the newspaper was sold and re-sold and filed for bankruptcy protection in 2009, it was purchased by local businessman Glen Taylor
Glen Taylor
in 2014. The Star Tribune
Star Tribune
serves Minneapolis
Minneapolis
and is distributed throughout the Minneapolis–Saint Paul
Minneapolis–Saint Paul
metropolitan area, the state of Minnesota
Minnesota
and the Upper Midwest
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Bay Area
The San Francisco
San Francisco
Bay Area (referred to locally as the Bay Area) is a populous region surrounding the San Francisco, San Pablo and Suisun estuaries in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of California. Although the exact boundaries of the region vary depending on the source, the Bay Area is generally accepted to include the nine counties that border the aforementioned estuaries: Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, Napa, San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Solano, and Sonoma. Other sources may exclude parts of or even entire counties, or include neighboring counties such as San Benito, San Joaquin, and Santa Cruz. Home to approximately 7.68 million people, Northern California’s nine-county Bay Area contains many cities, towns, airports, and associated regional, state, and national parks, connected by a complex multimodal transportation network
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Cream Of Mushroom Soup
Cream
Cream
of mushroom soup is a simple type of soup where a basic roux is thinned with cream or milk and then mushrooms and/or mushroom broth are added. It is well known in North America as a common type of condensed canned soup. Cream
Cream
of mushroom soup is often used as a base ingredient in casseroles and comfort foods. This use is similar to that of a mushroom-flavored gravy.Contents1 History 2 Regional usage 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] Soups made with cream and mushrooms are much older than the canned variety. Ancient Italian (Salsa colla) and French (Béchamel) cream sauces, and soups based on them have been made for many hundreds of years
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Main Street (novel)
Main Street
Main Street
is a satirical novel written by Sinclair Lewis, and published in 1920.Contents1 Plot summary 2 Literary significance and criticism 3 Allusions/references to history, geography and culture 4 Awards and nominations 5 See also 6 Notes 7 External linksPlot summary[edit] Carol Milford, the daughter of a judge, grew up in Mankato, Minnesota and became an orphan in her teens. In college, she reads a book on village improvement in a sociology class and begins to dream of redesigning villages and towns. After college, she attends a library school in Chicago and is exposed to radical ideas and lifestyles. She becomes a librarian in Saint Paul, Minnesota, the state capital, but finds the work unrewarding. She marries Will Kennicott, a doctor, who is a small-town boy at heart. When they marry, Will convinces her to live in his home-town of Gopher Prairie, Minnesota, a town modeled on Sauk Centre, Minnesota, the author's birthplace
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Subgum
Subgum
Subgum
or sub gum (traditional: 什錦; simplified: 什锦; Cantonese: sap6 gam2; pinyin: shí jǐn; literally "numerous and varied") is a type of American Chinese dish in which one or more meats or seafood are mixed with vegetables, and sometimes also noodles, rice, or soup. It originates from Cantonese
Cantonese
cuisine and is a commonly encountered dish on the menus of Chinese restaurants in North America. The earliest known mention of "subgum" is in 1902 in a list of Chinese dishes in the Chicago Daily Tribune.[1] An early indirect mention of sub-gum is in 1906;[2] in 1909, there is a more explicit reference to sub gum deang at a Chicago restaurant[3] and in 1913, to sub gum gai suey at a New York restaurant.[4]Contents1 See also 2 Notes 3 External links 4 See alsoSee also[edit]Chop suey ChamponNotes[edit]^ "A Line-O'-Type Or Two","Chicago Daily Tribune", January 25, 1902, p. 12 ^ J.H
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Sinclair Lewis
Harry Sinclair Lewis
Sinclair Lewis
(February 7, 1885 – January 10, 1951) was an American novelist, short-story writer, and playwright. In 1930, he became the first writer from the United States
United States
to receive the Nobel Prize in Literature, which was awarded "for his vigorous and graphic art of description and his ability to create, with wit and humor, new types of characters." His works are known for their insightful and critical views of American capitalism and materialism between the wars.[1] He is also respected for his strong characterizations of modern working women. H. L. Mencken
H. L. Mencken
wrote of him, "[If] there was ever a novelist among us with an authentic call to the trade ... it is this red-haired tornado from the Minnesota wilds."[2] He has been honored by the U.S
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Chun King
Chun King was an American line of canned Chinese food products founded in the 1940s by Jeno Paulucci, who also developed Jeno's Pizza Rolls and frozen pizza, and the Michelina's brand of frozen food products, among many others.[1] By 1962, Chun King was bringing in $30 million in annual revenue and accounted for half of all U.S. sales of prepared Chinese food. Chun King was sold to the R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company, in 1966 for $63 million.[1] R. J. Reynolds merged with Nabisco Brands in 1985 and the new company changed its name to RJR Nabisco in the following year. In 1989, Chun King was sold by RJR Nabisco to Yeo Hiap Seng of Singapore to help pay for Kohlberg Kravis Roberts's leverage buyout of RJR Nabisco.[2] RJR Nabisco had previously sold the Chun King line of frozen foods to ConAgra Foods in 1986
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Jeno Paulucci
Luigino "Jeno" Francesco Paulucci (July 5th, 1918 – November 24, 2011)[1] was an American businessman, investor, and philanthropist. Paulucci started over 70 companies; among the most well-known ventures included his frozen food company, Bellisio Foods, and food products such as Pizza Rolls and the Chun King line of Chinese food. He was also involved in charity work, publishing and public speaking.Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Charity and philanthropy 4 Controversy 5 Notes 6 External linksEarly life[edit] A self-described "peddler from the Iron Range", Paulucci was born in the mining town Hibbing, Minnesota. Paulucci's parents, Ettore and Michelina, had recently moved from Bellisio Solfare, hamlet of Pergola (Marche) Italy and his father was a miner in one of the region's iron mines. He began his long career in the grocery industry while working for his family's small grocery store during the Great Depression. On February 8, 1947, Paulucci married Lois Mae Trepanier
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